Playstation vr with ps4 pro

Playstation vr with ps4 pro DEFAULT

Buy PlayStation®VR

Find a PS VR bundle from an online retailer.

Marvel's Iron Man VR bundle

Suit up as the Armored Avenger in Marvel’s Iron Man VR and face off against one of Iron Man’s greatest foes in high stakes, action-packed battles.  

Bundle includes PlayStation VR headset, PlayStation Camera, PlayStation Move controllers, Marvel’s Iron Man VR Blu-Ray Disc, and Demo Disc 3.0

Download free PS VR game demos

Visit PlayStation Store and download two collections of playable PS VR demos – at no extra cost for you to try with your PS4 and PS VR headset.

Demo collection two

  • Battlezone
  • EVE: Valkyrie
  • Moss
  • Star Child
  • The Persistence
  • Thumper
  • Tiny Trax
  • Dino Frontier*
  • Fantastic Contraption*
  • Job Simulator*
  • Raw Data*
  • Rez Infinite

*PS Move required

Demo collection three

  • Astro Bot Rescue Mission
  • SUPERHOT VR
  • Headmaster
  • Resident Evil 7 biohazard teaser demo: The Kitchen
  • Job Simulator*
  • Moss
  • The Persistence
  • Thumper
  • Battlezone

*PS Move required

The Playroom VR

As a special bonus, every PS VR owner can download The Playroom VR from PlayStation Store, for no extra cost – as well as lots of other PS VR experiences that are free to download.

Featuring six fun packed games and a cast of hilarious, loveable VR bots, The Playroom VR is the perfect introduction to the world of PS VR for you and up to four friends.

© 2020 MARVEL

© 2020 Sony Interactive Entertainment LLC

Images reformatted for non-virtual reality display.
Please review and follow all safety guidelines for use of PlayStation®VR. PlayStation®VR is not for use by children under age 12. PlayStation®4 or PlayStation®5 system, PlayStation®VR, and PlayStation®Camera are required to experience VR functionality. "PlayStation", the "PS" family logo, "PS5" and "PS4" are trademarks of Sony Interactive Entertainment, Inc.

Sours: https://www.playstation.com/en-us/ps-vr/bundles/

If you’ve bought a PlayStation VR (PSVR), you don’t want to waste your time working out how to connect it to your PlayStation 4 (PS4); you just want to play some of the best VR games available. Thankfully, Sony has made it easy to connect a PSVR set to both the PlayStation 4 and PlayStation 4 Pro with minimal hassle.

How to Set Up PlayStation VR: Get Started with PSVR on PS4

To confuse matters somewhat, there are actually two types of PlayStation VR headsets, including CUH-ZVR1 and CUH-ZVR2. Initial set-up stages for the two are identical, but they vary towards the end of the process. The CUH-ZVR1 has a sliding cover on the processor unit and the power button is on the headset connection cable. The CUH-ZVR2 doesn’t have a sliding cover on the processor unit and its power button is on the headset directly. ZVR2 is also capable of HDR passthrough, making it a better model to use with the PS4 Pro and your shiny 4K TV. Make sure you know which model you have.

You’ll also need a PS Camera to get PlayStation VR to work. These don’t come as standard with the PSVR set, but you can buy a Starter Kit bundle that includes one.

How to Connect PlayStation VR

Before you set up the PlayStation VR, make sure your PS4 and TV are turned off. If you bought the PS4 with the PlayStation VR, you’ll have to set up the console first.

  1. Connect the PSVR processor unit to your TV. It’s best to use the longer HDMI cable that came with the PS4 for this.

    Source: playstation.com
  2. Connect the PS Camera to the PS4. Sony recommends placing the camera at least 1.4 meters (approximately 4 foot 7 inches) off the ground.

    Source: playstation.com
  3. Connect the PSVR unit to the back of your PS4 console using the supplied HDMI cable (labeled #1) and to the front of the console using the USB cable (labeled #2).

    Source: playstation.com
  4. Use the AC power cord (labeled #3) to attach the processor unit to a power socket. Remember, you’ll need to keep the PS4 plugged into an outlet.

    Source: playstation.com

For more details, see Sony’s PSVR Installation guide.

From here, the process for setting up the PlayStation VR differs slightly between models.

READ NEXT: The best PlayStation VR games of 2018

How to connect PlayStation VR: CUH-ZVR1

  1. The CUH-ZVR1 VR headset cable includes an inline remote, which has the power button on it. Find the headphones jack on the remote and connect your headphones.
  2. Attach the two PSVR HDMI connection cables (labeled #4). To do this, you’ll need to slide the VR HDMI port cover (the entire right-side portion of the VR processor unit) back to expose the sockets. Match up the four PS symbols to their counterparts on the cables, and then slide the port cover back into place.
  3. Connect the other end of the PSVR HDMI connection cable to the headset cable (labeled #5), matching up the symbols appropriately.
  4. Turn on the TV first, then your PS4. Once these devices are powered up, fire up the PSVR with the power button on the inline remote. The blue lights on the top of the headband light up when it’s ready to use.
  5. You’ll be prompted to update or download the PlayStation VR Device Software. You’ll need an internet connection for this, but it won’t take long.
  6. Read and follow the on-screen instructions to properly configure and optimize your VR headset.

How to connect PlayStation VR: CUH-ZVR2

  1. The CUH-ZVR2 VR headset cable does not include an inline remote with a headphones jack like the CUH-ZVR1 but features the jack on the headband instead. Find the headphones jack and connect your headphones.
  2. Insert the two PSVR headset cables (labeled #4) into the processor unit. CUH-ZVR2 does not have a sliding port cover like the CUH-ZVR1 model. Match up the four PS symbols on each plug to the same ones found on the processor unit.
  3. Turn on the Tv, then the PS4. Once the devices power up, turn on the PSVR using the power button on the headset. When the device is ready, the blue lights on the top of the headband will display.
  4. Follow the on-screen instructions to properly configure and optimize the VR headset.
Sours: https://www.alphr.com/sony/1009937/how-to-set-up-playstation-vr-get-started-with-psvr-on-ps4/
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PS VR: Quick start guide

Learn how to get started with PlayStation VR on PlayStation®5 and PlayStation®4 consoles.

What you need to get started

If you have purchased a new PlayStation®5 or PlayStation®4 console alongside PlayStation VR (PS VR), set up your console first by following the on-screen instructions and then shut down the system before setting up PS VR.

Find out your PS VR model 

You can find instructions to help you get started with your PS VR in the following sections. Use the information below to identify which model of PS VR you have.

CUH-ZVR1

 CUH-ZVR2

  • Sliding cover on Processor Unit.

  • Serial number on rear of Processor Unit starting with P01/P02.

  • Power button on in-line remote.

  • Solid Processor Unit.

  • Serial number on rear of Processor Unit starting with P03.

  • Power button on underside of headset scope.

2. How to connect everything
  1. Connect the processor unit to your TV with the HDMI supplied with your console. If your console is connected to your TV unplug the HDMI from your console and plug it into the processor unit.
  1. Connect the PlayStation Camera to your PS4 (PS5 console requires a PS Camera adaptor). The ideal height to place it is 1.4m (4’7”) from the floor. 
  1. Plug the HDMI (1) into the back of the console and the processor unit. If you are using another HDMI, check its packaging to make sure it’s at least HDMI 1.4.
  1. Plug the USB cable (2) into the back of the processor unit and the front of your console.
  1. Connect the AC power cord into the adaptor cable (3) and plug into the electricity supply.
  1. Slide the processor unit  connection cover back and plug in the VR connection cable (4).
  1. Connect the VR headset (5) to the VR connection cable (4).
  1. Switch on your TV and power up your console via the DUALSHOCK 4 or DualSense wireless controller.
  2. Press the power button on the inline remote on the headset connection cable (5).

  3. You may be prompted to update PlayStation VR Device Software at this stage.

  4. You’re now ready to begin configuration. Follow the on-screen instructions.

3. Configuring your camera

We know you’re excited to get playing, but it’s really important to take your time with configuration to get the best possible gaming experience.

Camera configuration 

  1. Place the PS Camera about 1.4m (4’7”) high and about 2m (6’) away from where you will be sitting or standing.
  2. Your TV will show an image of what the PS Camera can see. Angle it to make sure it’s not picking up the surface it’s on.
  3. Position yourself where you will be playing VR, in the center of the screen while you’re holding your DualShock 4 controller, PlayStation Aim, or PS Move controllers. This is important to make sure the PS Camera can place controllers in the right spot in the VR environment.
  4. If you and the controllers were not in the center of the screen when you hit ‘Continue’ or if more than one person was in the Play Area, you may need to repeat step 3.
  5. If you’re still having problems adjusting the camera this could be because the room lighting is too bright. Find out how to set up your room for the best experience and try again.

 To reconfigure the PS Camera:

PS5

  • Go to Settings Accessories PlayStation VR Adjust PS Camera.

PS4

  • Go to Settings Devices PlayStation VR Adjust PS Camera.
4. Configuring your headset

Almost there! Next, make sure that the headset is as comfortable as possible. 

  1. Switch the headset on (I).
  2. If you are using earbuds put them on (making sure that left and right go in the correct ears!) and plug them into the stereo headphone jack (H). Be careful with the game volume to make sure it’s not too loud (K & L). Please note that Bluetooth earbuds and headphones are not compatible with PS VR - you must use wired earbuds or headphones.
  3. Remove the plastic lens protectors before putting the headset on for the first time.
  4. Hold the headset by the headband (A), not the scope (the bit with the blue lights), press the headband release button (E) and pull the front section forward.
  5. Place the headset on your head and release the headband release button.
  6. Tighten the headband using the adjustment dial (D) just enough to stop movement, but not so far that it feels too tight.
  7. Adjust the scope position by carefully holding it around the edges and wiggling it until it’s comfortable and the image is as clear as possible.
  8. If you are using over-ear headphones with a headband, put them on (making sure that left and right go on the correct ears!) and plug them into the stereo headphone jack (H). Be careful with the volume to make sure it’s not too loud (K & L). Please note that Bluetooth earbuds and headphones are not compatible with PS VR - you must use wired earbuds or headphones.
  9. To remove the headset, press the headband release button (E) and re-extend the head band (A).
  10. Lift the headset by the head band.

You can also find these instructions on your console:

PS5

  • Go to Settings > Accessories > PlayStation VR > Check How to Put On VR Headset

PS4

2. How to connect everything
  1. Connect an existing HDMI cable between your TV and the HDMI (TV) port of your Processor Unit.
  1. Connect the PlayStation Camera to your PS4 (PS5 console requires a PS Camera adaptor). The ideal height to place it is 1.4m (4’7”) from the floor.
  1. Connect the HDMI cable (1) between your console and the HDMI port on the Processor Unit.
  1. Connect the USB cable (2) between the front of your console and the rear of the Processor Unit.
  1. Connect the AC power cord into the AC adaptor, and plug the adaptor cable (3) into the rear of the Processor Unit. Now safely plug the power cord into an electricity supply.
  1. Connect the PlayStation VR headset cable (4) into the Processor Unit matching the symbols displayed.
  1. You can now connect your stereo headphones into the PlayStation VR headset.
  1. Switch on your TV and power up your console by holding down the PS button on the DUALSHOCK 4 controller.

  2. Press the power button (A) located on the underside of the PlayStation VR headset scope. When the headset is turned on, the tracking lights on the rear will glow blue (B).

  1. You’re now ready to begin the headset configuration. Follow the on-screen instructions for the best results, but you can also follow the steps below.

3. Configuring your camera
  1. Place the PS Camera about 1.4m (4’7”) high and about 2m (6’) away from where you will be sitting or standing.
  2. Your TV will show an image of what the PS Camera can see. Angle it to make sure it’s not picking up the surface it’s on.
  3. Position yourself where you will be playing VR, in the center of the screen while you’re holding your DUALSHOCK 4 or DualSense wireless controller, PlayStation Aim, or PS Move controllers. This is important to make sure the PS Camera can place controllers in the right spot in the VR environment.
  4. If you and the controllers were not in the center of the screen when you hit ‘Continue’ or if more than one person was in the Play Area, you may need to repeat step 3.
  5. If you’re still having problems adjusting the camera this could be because the room lighting is too bright. To reconfigure the PS Camera:

PS5

  • Go to Settings > Accessories > PlayStation VR Adjust PS Camera.

PS4

  • Go to Settings > Devices > PlayStation VR > Adjust PS Camera.

4. Configuring your headset
  1.  Switch the headset on using the power button (J) on the underside of the headset scope.
  2. If you are using the stereo in-ear headphones, plug them into the stereo headphone jack (H) and connect the headphone attachment to the headphone attachment hole (I).
  3. Remove the plastic lens protectors before putting the headset on for the first time.
  4. Hold the headset by the top of the headband (A), press the headband release button (E) and pull the front section forward.
  5. Place the headset on your head and release the headband release button.
  6. Tighten the headband using the adjustment dial (D) just enough to stop movement, but not so far that it feels too tight.
  7. Adjust the scope position by carefully holding it around the edges and wiggling it until it’s comfortable and the image is as clear as possible.
  8. If you are using over-ear headphones with a headband, put them on (making sure that left and right go on the correct ears) and plug them into the stereo headphone jack (H). You can adjust the volume using the buttons (N & P) on the underside of the headset scope. Please note that Bluetooth earbuds and headphones are not compatible with PS VR - you must use wired earbuds or headphones.
  9. To remove the headset, press the headband release button (E) and re-extend the head band (A).
  10. Lift the headset by the head band.

You can also find these instructions on your console:

PS5

  • Go to Settings Accessories PlayStation VR Check How to Put On VR Headset.

PS4

  • Go to Settings Devices PlayStationVR > Check How to Put On VR Headset.

Wearing glasses with PS VR

Wearing glasses with PS VR

You can wear the VR headset over your glasses but take care when adjusting the scope.  Having your glasses touch the lens could result in damage to your glasses, VR headset lens or both. Do not push in or pull out the scope excessively.

If you notice that PS VR environments are unclear or fuzzy while you’re wearing your glasses, try taking them off and readjust the scope position before you start play. Try playing with and without your glasses to find out what works best for you.

Sours: https://www.playstation.com/en-us/support/hardware/psvr-quick-start-guide/
Top 10 Best PSVR Games

Live the game

Immerse yourself in incredible virtual reality games and experiences.

Immerse yourself in incredible virtual reality games and experiences.

Put yourself at the center of an extraordinary gaming universe with PS VR exclusive games, all powered by your PlayStation® console.

Play supported PS VR games on your new PS5™

Connect your PlayStation®VR to your PS5 console to enjoy supported PS VR games. 

  • Backwards compatibility
    Play a back catalog of supported PS VR games on your PS5 console
  • Game boost
    Enjoy faster and smoother frame rates in select PS VR games.

Connect your PlayStation®VR to your PS5 console to enjoy supported PS VR games. To set up your PS VR with your PS5 console you’ll need your PlayStation®Camera for PS4™ (Model CUH-ZEY1 or CUH-ZEY2) and a PlayStation®Camera adaptor (no purchase necessary. Visit playstation.com/camera-adaptor for details)

For the best PS VR experience on PS5 we recommend using a DUALSHOCK®4 wireless controller. Selected games may require PlayStation®Move motion controllers or be compatible with the PlayStation®VR aim controller. The new HD camera for PS5 is not compatible with PS VR. The PS VR headset, PS Camera, DUALSHOCK 4 wireless controller, PS Move controllers and PS VR aim controller are all sold separately from PS5.

Full immersion

360-degree vision
Watch as a living, breathing game world comes alive all around you, with a seamless field of view wherever you turn.

Stunning visuals
Experience new realities with a custom OLED screen and smooth 120fps visuals to create complete immersion in your games.

Incredible audio

3D audio
Discover a new dimension in sound as 3D audio technology lets you pinpoint the direction and distance of sounds coming from all around you.

Built in mic
Chat to your online friends, discuss in-game tactics and strengthen your immersion in the virtual world with the headset’s integrated microphone. 

Thrilling PS VR games and experiences

Exclusive PS VR games

Play incredible games like Astro Bot Rescue Mission, Blood and Truth and Dreams VR.

VR Experiences

Sit back and immerse yourself with a range of stunning virtual reality experiences, from scaling Mount Everest to exploring the ocean floor.

Blockbuster adventures

Enjoy full-scale PlayStation gaming in virtual reality, with PS VR support for games like Star Wars: Squadron, Minecraft and Marvel's Iron Man VR.

PlayStation Camera

With dual lenses and 3D depth sensors, the PlayStation Camera tracks the position of the headset, PlayStation Move controller and DUALSHOCK 4 wireless controller from every angle.

Precision tracking

Nine LEDs positioned on the front, back and sides of the PS VR headset are tracked by the PlayStation Camera – ensuring pinpoint accuracy within the game world, wherever you are in the room.

DUALSHOCK 4 wireless controller

The PS4 precision control you love takes on a new dimension with PS VR; every game is compatible with the DUALSHOCK 4 wireless controller, while the light bar is constantly tracked to further enhance in-game movement.

PlayStation Move motion controller

Bring your hands into the game world and take full control of your VR experiences, giving an even deeper sense of presence and further enhancing your immersion.

Play together

Project your PS VR experiences directly to your TV screen with Mirror mode, letting friends and family see what you’re seeing and giving them a window into your virtual world.

Share your adventures with friends and let them join the game as player two, using a second controller to play along on the TV screen.

Marvel's Iron Man VR bundle

Suit up as the Armored Avenger in Marvel’s Iron Man VR and face off against one of Iron Man’s greatest foes in high stakes, action-packed battles.  

Bundle includes PlayStation VR headset, PlayStation Camera, PlayStation Move controllers, Marvel’s Iron Man VR Blu-Ray Disc, and Demo Disc 3.0

Help and support

Find out everything you need to know to get started with PlayStation VR – from setting up and connecting your headset and PlayStation Camera, to how to arrange your room to get the best experience possible.

© 2020 MARVEL

© 2020 Sony Interactive Entertainment LLC

Images reformatted for non-virtual reality display.
Please review and follow all safety guidelines for use of PlayStation®VR. PlayStation®VR is not for use by children under age 12. PlayStation®4 or PlayStation®5 system, PlayStation®VR, and PlayStation®Camera are required to experience VR functionality. "PlayStation", the "PS" family logo, "PS5" and "PS4" are trademarks of Sony Interactive Entertainment, Inc.

Sours: https://www.playstation.com/en-us/ps-vr/

Ps4 pro playstation vr with

Does PlayStation 4 Pro really improve virtual reality performance?

With the arrival of the current generation of virtual reality, much of the battle for hardware supremacy has focused on one seemingly esoteric factor: the trade-off between image resolution and frame-rate.

It may seem like a curiously technical point on which to define a consumer product war, but with VR, how a game is displayed isn’t just a matter of aesthetics; it can severely impact user comfort, and even function. In designing their respective headsets, the teams behind Oculus’ Rift and HTC’s Vive opted to offer high display resolution. Each headset sports a 2160 x 1200 overall output, comfortably trumping PlayStation VR’s 1920 x 1080 fidelity.

So why did Sony choose to make sacrifices in image quality? One factor, it appears, is that PSVR has forgone peak resolution so as prioritise running at an impressive 120 frames-per-second (FPS), capably beating the 90FPS offered by HTC and Oculus. Technically, some content for Sony’s headset is bumped from 60FPS to the full 120FPS via an approach named reprojection, but the point stands. PSVR sacrifices resolution in favour of more comfortable movement.

That potential for fluidity means a less jarring experience as you spin your head when inside a virtual realm, which in turn serves VR’s ultimate offering: presence. This is the most striking element of a quality virtual reality experience; the sense that you really occupy the world you are visiting. But as potent as that sensation can be, with a stutter of the screen image the illusion can come crashing down.

The PlayStation 4 Pro – which already offers several advantages away from VR – hopes to bolster Sony’s position on this arcane frontline. With a faster CPU and more powerful graphics processing than the standard PS4, it promises to augment the capabilities of the PlayStation VR hardware. We set out to see just how noticeable this is.

4K VR?

The boost the PS4 Pro provides to PSVR slightly adjusts the frame-rate/resolution trade-off, potentially bettering both image and movement quality.
Any improvement, however, is strictly limited by the existing PSVR hardware, which is locked at the aforementioned 1920 x 1080 resolution. In other words, whatever technical powerhouse you plug into Sony’s headset, the screen is the size it is. It is not 4K and does not support HDR; two front-of-the-box features on which the PS4 Pro is being sold to traditional flat display users.

However, the upgraded PlayStation does promise to improve frame-rate smoothness and consistency for VR, which should further remove judder and blur from any virtual reality game optimised for the Pro. That is an important note. Many future PSVR releases will come ‘Pro-ready’, while numerous existing titles have already been prepared for the machine via an update.

The key question, then, is what real difference does this all make to those games?
Without considering motion, a given Pro-optimised PSVR game typically looks only delicately improved by the more powerful PS4. Across the spread of smaller experiences in Sony’s own VR Worlds, there appears to be a little more graphical finesse via a Pro, while in the more complex Until Dawn: Rush of Blood or Driveclub VR, there is more discernible improvement in detail and texturing. The tangle of neon-slash wireframes within Res Infinite’s VR mode, meanwhile, do look as if they are a touch more vibrant and present.

And then there’s Robinson, Crytek’s tale of being stranded alone on a dinosaur-riddled island. ‘Pro from day-one’, Robinson is perhaps the best-looking PSVR game yet, regardless of the console version powering it. But bolstered by Pro, detail at distance is notably improved, in tandem with support for the enhanced SSDO/SSAO lighting effects exposing that visual quality. Add in higher quality texture filtering and more seamless level of detail (LOD) generation, and while the difference is neither striking nor game-changing, Robinson is definitely a prettier game when played through a Pro.

However, all Pro-ready titles tested still carry a resolution somewhat lower than scene of a typical HD flat display, thanks to PSVR’s ‘per eye’ resolution of 960 x 1080, so visually, the upgraded console remains fundamentally comparable to that enjoyed on a vanilla PS4.

But there’s something else to consider.

Motionally charged?

Start to move around a little more and a few more benefits materialise. Most importantly, there is less motion blurring. A sharp flick of the head from left to right reveals that even rapid movements are greeted with slightly crisper, steadier images, all of which makes things more convincing, and more immersive. The improvement is subtle, but the impact is more significant – it can make all the difference between a comfortable experience and a nausea-inducing nightmare.

Even in low-movement titles, like the understated block stacking puzzler Tumble, that improvement can be felt, and for more energetic experiences like online shooter RIGS: Mechanized Combat League or VR Worlds’ Scavengers Odyssey, things do feel a touch more fluid. Again, the improvement isn’t wild or outstanding, but something feels different.

Res Infinite is very comfortable with the intensity setting pushed to its upper limit via a PS4 Pro, and back in the front seat of Driveclub VR the experience does feel just a shade more comfortable and less demanding of the senses. But then Driveclub VR was always a comfortable game.

Robinson, meanwhile, has a few too many moments that trigger motion sickness on a standard PlayStation 4 – and alas, over on the Pro, it’s the same story, despite all the improvements to level of detail generation and texture filtering. That alone highlights an oft forgotten point when considering the quality and usability of a VR experience: arguably the onus is on the content, not the platform.

There’s more good news, though. Broadly, loading times have been cut a good deal, which also limits how much texture pop-in blights games – another factor that can significantly impact a sense of presence. And while it is a small detail, the extra USB port on the Pro’s rear does make the PSVR’s abundant wiring a tidier business, leaving an extra port free at the front for controller charging; an important consideration when juggling the power levels of Move controllers as well as DualShock 4s.

The VR verdict

Ultimately, The PlayStation 4 Pro does make a difference to PSVR games, but for now, it is subtle, and the true potential may only emerge with time as more and more titles hip with Pro-native features. If you are particularly prone to simulation or motion sickness, getting a Pro now may just make a positive difference to your VR experience.

For those beguiled by even the most delicate improvements to graphically fidelity, meanwhile, there should be some appeal. And if you are already set to gain from the non-VR perks the Pro offers, then the fact that you’ll also have access to the best version of one of the most comfortable, accessible high-end VR experiences could make it very worth your while.

Sours: https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2016/nov/14/does-playstation-4-pro-really-improve-virtual-reality-performance
Oculus Quest 2 vs Playstation VR - Which is BETTER?

Sony has been awfully busy so far in 2016. Less than a month since the PlayStation VR headset released into the wild, the gaming giant is already releasing a brand new iterative upgrade on its flagship gaming console. This week, the PlayStation 4 Pro will release, offering 4K resolutions, HDR content, and improved performance and stability. It’s far from what a theoretical PS5 might look like, but the PS4 Pro is still an improvement over the standard PS4.

If you’re curious about how well the PS4 Pro performs for standard 2D gaming, then this isn’t the review for you. I played Shadows of Mordor and The Last of Us Remastered a bit on the new PS4 Pro that Sony sent me for review because I’m as excited about 4K gaming as the next guy, but that’s not what the bulk of my assessment was focused on. For us here at UploadVR, what we care most about is the immersive medium of virtual reality.

So I decided to instead ask: Does the PS4 Pro really and truly improve the PS VR experience? Let’s dive right in. If you want to get an up-close look at the device, the new controller, and how it looks sitting alongside the VR headset, then take a look a look at our early PS4 Pro unboxing photos from last week.

ps4-pro-front-view

PS4 Pro Design and Specs

Stylistically, the PS4 Pro looks awfully similar to the standard PS4. Generally, it has the same parallelogram-meets-sandwich-style design, although it is a bit sleeker. Instead of half the top being glossy and the other half matte, the entire outer casing now has a matte finish. The center PS logo on the top is reflective, which is a nice touch. On the bottom, the cross, square, circle, and triangle icons are used as the little rubber feet that keep the console from sliding around. It looks and works great both laying flat and standing upright. Surprisingly, it’s much quieter than the original PS4 in my experience, even after being left on for a while, and it never overheated for me.

In terms of specs, the PS4 Pro is definitely an upgrade where it counts most. For starters, it features an HDMI 2.0 out port, which is what enables the full 4K resolution and HDR for TVs that support it. Worth noting is that even if your TV is a 4K device, it may not be an HDR device, which adds additional vibrancy and depth to the visuals, so take note if that’s important to you.

Under the hood, the AMD CPU with eight jaguar cores is clocked at 2.1 GHz, compared to the standard PS4’s 1.4 GHz. And since the GPU is powered by AMD’s ‘Polaris’ architecture, it’s actually increased to 4.2 teraflops, from the standard model’s 1.84 — which is a big improvement. Thankfully, the 1TB of default storage is double the size of the standard model, but it still doesn’t support external storage drives, although you can upgrade it internally if you want.

For actually playing games, you’ll be treated to a nearly identical, but slightly improved, DualShock 4 controller as well. It feels better, more precise, and sturdier in your hands without sacrificing the original design. I was especially fond of the new material on the control sticks and the improved hand grip textures.

All this adds up to a machine that can display at much higher resolutions, more stable frame rates, crisper visuals, and increased horsepower. Load times feel shorter in games as well, although that is an entirely anecdotal observation. This console still pales in comparison to a top-of-the-line custom-built PC, but it offers an admirable improvement over Sony’s base model.

ps4-pro-box-contents-2

Console Setup

In terms of setup, if you do not currently own a PS4 at all, then it couldn’t be easier. Plug the power cord into the wall, plug the HDMI cord into the best socket your TV’s got (with the highest refresh rate, resolution, and HDR support of course,) and ideally jam the ethernet cord in as well to enjoy the sweet taste of hard-wired internet access. That’s really all you have to do as a bare minimum.

If you’ve got a PS4 already, things get a little more time consuming. You can actually transfer all of your installed games, save files, media captures, settings, and essentially everything else quite simply. Just make sure both consoles are logged onto the same PSN account and the same WiFi signal, then link them up with an ethernet cord, and follow the on-screen prompts. While it’s relatively easy to do, it’s still cumbersome. Roughly 300GB of data from my old PS4 took a little over an hour to fully transfer.

If you are setting up your PS VR with your new PS4 Pro as well, then it is worth noting that the Processor Unit that was required for your headset is not only still required, but it also disables HDR content. So that means if you want to view any HDR content, the HDMI cord must go directly from the PS4 Pro to your TV, without passing through the Processor Unit at all. It’s a bit of an annoyance, but it’s easily solved in most cases.

ps4-pro-with-psvr

The PlayStation VR Experience on PS4 Pro

This is the big question for a lot of people: Does the PS4 Pro really improve the PS VR experience? According to Greg Koreman, co-foudner of Impulse Gear, the company that’s developing Farpoint, back when the PS4 Pro was first unveiled he told UploadVR in an interview that, “Across the board, it’s more crisp. That’s because we are rendering roughly twice as many pixels. So absolutely everything will look clearer.” But since the lenses themselves inside the headset aren’t displaying at 4K resolution, why does any of this matter?

Well, it’s a complex answer. Objectively speaking, yes, PS VR games do look better when running on a PS4 Pro. After setting them both up, side-by-side, on the same television using the same headset, I can confirm that games are noticeably sharper and crisper, especially if they have received an official patch incorporating support for PS4 Pro. Games like Battlezone and PS VR Worlds were patched ahead of time for testing, but even games like Driveclub VR, which didn’t have official Pro patches yet, looked crisper and smoother inside the headset.

Since adding Pro support is entirely up to the developers, it’s a bit of a mixed bag still. EVE: Valkyrie could arguable benefit from it the most, as the jagged edges and intense action could use the extra boost that the Pro affords, but I didn’t notice much of a difference in that one yet.

Ultimately though, most of the PS VR games are nearly identical, even if they have been patched with Pro support. No matter what spec sheet you look at, marketing material you read, or trailer you watch, at the end of the day they are all still PS4 games running on a PS4 inside of a PS VR. It won’t ever approach the same level of detail possible on a high-end gaming PC powering an HTC Vive or Oculus Rift. The PS VR is still a less powerful, but awfully capable headset — even when propped up by the additional strength of the PS4 Pro.

Does it offer marginal enhancements? Yes. Are those enhancements enough to persuade you to go out and buy a new console? That depends on a lot of factors. Here is a full list of expected launch support for PS VR games on the PS4 Pro.

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What About 4K Gaming and Video?

Even though I was mostly evaluating the PS VR enhancements, I did test out the non-VR 4K features and came away impressed. There is a noticeable difference for games that receive upgraded patches enabling native 4K displays. However, since all developers are still required to support the standard model PS4 as well, that means that it’s going to be supported only on a case-by-case basis.

Some games will just be upscaled to 4K, some will run natively. Some games will run in 4K but only at 30FPS, while other games will run in 1080p but at 60FPS. Some games will see enhanced visuals, load times, and draw distances on a PS4 Pro even on a non-4K TV, while other games will run and play noticeably better on a premium 4K television.

It’s a bit all over the place and you should do research about which games receive which kind of support before diving in.

As for video, the PS4 Pro does support 4K streaming, but not 4K Blu-ray playback. It’s a baffling decision, especially considering the Xbox One S supports native 4K Blu-ray playback. If you’re enjoying videos on Netflix, YouTube, or another streaming service that happen to be in 4k though, then you’re fine.

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Final Verdict: Should You Buy A PS4 Pro?

As is the case most often with these sorts of situations, you likely already know if the PS4 Pro is a device for you. If you’re the type of person that already has an HDR-capable 4K television, then upgrading to a marginally better PS4 Pro is probably a no-brainer decision. However, if you don’t have a 4K TV, aren’t overly concerned with the intricacies of your game’s visual fidelity, or already enjoy the quality of your PS VR experiences, then the PS4 Pro frankly doesn’t offer you a whole lot of advantages.

But if you’ve already got a stellar TV, don’t have a PS4 yet, or want to enjoy the highest-quality VR experience possible on a console, then you might want to look at getting a PS4 Pro. Even then though, wait for a bundle or a sale that catches your eye — there’s no rush. The Standard, Slim, and Pro PS4 models all play the exact same content either way.


For any additional questions about the PS4 Pro, I highly recommend checking out Sony’s official FAQ. You can also read our full review of the PS VR headset itself right here.

Sours: https://uploadvr.com/ps4-pro-psvr-review/

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