Fire in baker city oregon

Fire in baker city oregon DEFAULT

Fire Department

Our Mission: To provide dependable and efficient emergency services.
Our Vision: To promote and encourage high quality training, education and development to better serve our community.
Our Values: These attributes make up our core values: Integrity, Compassion, and Pride.


 

The Baker City Fire Department (BCFD) responded to about 1,700 calls for emergency service in 2019 providing both fire and emergency medical services to our citizens. BCFD personnel also provided emergency medical services to the citizens outside the Baker City limits, along with mutual aid fire protection to our neighboring departments. The Baker City Fire Department is responsible for approximately 8 square miles and 10,000 citizens for fire protection and approximately 1600 square miles and 14,500 citizens for paramedic services.

BCFD has one centrally located fire station that is staffed 24 hours/day. There are 15 professional career firefighters and 7 paid-part time firefighters.  All professional career employees are Oregon certified EMT-Intermediates or EMT-Paramedics. All of our personnel have met high levels of training in fire suppression operations. BCFD operates two front-line Type 1 fire engines, one 75 ft Aerial (Quint) ladder truck, four ALS ambulances, one rescue/command vehicle, one Type 6 Brush Patrol and one Command vehicle.

The Baker City Fire Department is the only professional fire department in Baker County. BCFD provides paramedic ambulance service and fire suppression service county wide. BCFD is focused on the community and takes pride in working efficiently, effectively and safely while producing positive outcomes for those who need our service. If you have any questions or comments, or would like to access the non-emergency services we provide, feel free to call us at 541-523-3711.

Sours: https://www.bakercity.com/2156/Fire-Department

Wildfire Incident Information

Long Branch
FIRE

800.0
acres

41.2 mi
E of Baker City, OR

2 weeksago
supressed

This fire is no longer active

Last Updated:

2 years, 11 months ago

Incident #:

2018-ORWWF-001056

Fire Start:

Thursday, September 20, 2018 1:26 PM PDT

Fuels:

Grass,timber & Brush

Dispatch Notes:

Human caused, resource responded 9/20, fire started on unprotected land | Out: 10/11/18 1030

Primary Fire Agency

US Forest Service — Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

Current Weather

Fire Growth Potential

Fire Weather Forecast

Dispatch Contact

Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center | La Grande, OR
541-963-7171
http://bmidc.org

Sours: https://www.fireweatheravalanche.org/wildfire/incident/61030/oregon/long-branch-fire
  1. 2017 single cab silverado dropped
  2. Quickbooks self employed down
  3. 5 8 thick bamboo flooring
  4. Custom halo xbox one controller

Wildfire Incident Information

Tamarack
FIRE

0.1
acres

21.4 mi
NE of Baker City, OR

1 weekago
supressed

This fire is no longer active

Last Updated:

2 years, 2 months ago

Incident #:

2019-ORWWF-000478

Fire Start:

Monday, July 15, 2019 12:37 PM PDT

Dispatch Notes:

Lightning caused. Fs stat. Resources responded 7/15. | Contain: 07/15/19 1518 | Control: 07/16/19 1455 | Out: 07/24/19 1312

Primary Fire Agency

US Forest Service — Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

Current Weather

Fire Growth Potential

Fire Weather Forecast

Dispatch Contact

Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center | La Grande, OR
541-963-7171
http://bmidc.org

Sours: https://www.fireweatheravalanche.org/wildfire/incident/83011/oregon/tamarack-fire
House Fire on the Corner of 7th and Carter in Baker City, Oregon

Lightning sparks 2 Large Fires in Baker County

Release Date: Aug 12, 2015

Contact(s): Katy Gray


Official Fire Information

Jamie Knight, ODF – (541)786-2039

Katy Gray, Wallowa-Whitman National Forest – (541)519-4623

 

Lightning sparks 2 Large Fires in Baker County

Baker City, OR – As a result of recent lightning activity, 2 large incidents have ignited across Baker County, with smoke and fire fighting aircraft visible from Baker City.

The larger of the two fires is the Cornet Fire, which is currently burning on private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry, Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and Vale BLM District approximately 7 miles east of Hereford, Oregon. The fire is currently 5,000 acres and with just over 100 personnel on scene. Additional resources are on order. Oregon Interagency Incident Management Team 4 (ORIMT4), with Incident Commander Brian Goff, will assume command of the fire on Wednesday evening, Aug 12th. ORIMT4 brings a wealth knowledge and skill to the table, with many of the team members coming from local, Northeast Oregon Interagency organizations.

The second incident is a small complex of 3 fires, the Eagle Complex, burning 10 miles east of Medical Springs, Oregon. The 3 fires are currently 120 acres, 40 acres and 10 acres in size and are burning on the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry. Resources on scene include 4 engines and two, 10 person hand crews as well as several aviation resources. Additional resources are on order. An Interagency Type 3 Management team will assume command of the fire on Wednesday, August 12th.

A level 1 notice has been sent to residents in the Stices Gulch and Black Mountain area associated with the Cornet Fire, and along Forest Service Road 77 near Tamarack Camp Ground, the Bennett Peak and Main Eagle areas associated with the Eagle Complex. A Level I notice means residents should be READY  to evacuate and continue to closely monitor local media and incident information. Questions regarding evacuation notices and the evacuation process can be direction to the Baker County Emergency Management at 541-523-8200.

Fire officials want to remind everyone that the current fire danger rating remains at EXTREME and Public Use Restrictions involving campfires and chainsaw use are in effect. Regulated closures are in effect on State and private lands protected by Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) in northeast and central Oregon.  On the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest lands Public Use Restrictions are in effect, including campfire restrictions and use of chainsaws.

Vale BLM Unit is also managing several large fires in the Burnt River area; additional information can be found at:  http://www.blm.gov/or/districts/vale/fire/report-fire.php.

 

Additional information on the Cornet Fire and Eagle Complex can be found on the following sites:

Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch Center – www.bmidc.org

Blue Mountain Fire Information Blog – www.bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com

Cornet Fire on InciWeb - http://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/4478/

Wallowa Whitman National Forest –

-          Website: www.fs.usda.gov/wallowa-whitman

-          Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/WallowaWhitmanNF

-          Twitter: @WallowaWhitman 



Sours: https://www.fs.usda.gov/detail/wallowa-whitman/news-events/?cid=STELPRD3849567

City oregon in baker fire

Joe Hessel remembers when the Dooley Mountain fire, which burned 20,000 acres south of Baker City over several days, was a “giant” blaze.

Today he’s coordinating the effort to stem a fire that burned more land than that every day.

For almost two weeks straight.

This yawning difference between what was typical early in Hessel’s career, and what is commonplace today, illustrates his longevity in a way perhaps more compelling than a couple of numbers can.

Certainly Hessel, who lives in Baker City and is in his 38th summer amidst the smoke and the flames, can attest to the changes time has wrought when it comes to fighting wildland fires in Oregon and across the West.

The Dooley Mountain fire, sparked by lightning in late July 1989, was at the time the biggest blaze in Baker County in several decades.

It was also an abnormally large fire by Oregon standards.

But today, the acreage charred that distant summer would occupy a scarcely noticeable corner of the fire that has kept Hessel away from his Baker City home, and his La Grande office, for almost two weeks.

Hessel, 54, who is the Northeast District forester for the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF), is one of three incident commanders for the Bootleg fire, a lightning fire burning in Klamath and Lake counties in south-central Oregon.

At 400,000 acres as of Thursday, July 22, it’s the nation’s biggest blaze, the one responsible for much of the smoke that has clogged Baker Valley at times this month.

The one that has spawned smoke plumes which look, from the vantage point of space satellites, similar to a cataclysmic volcanic eruption.

Hessel said his experience on the Bootleg fire has led him to ponder, as he sometimes has over the past 32 years, the days when he worked on the Dooley Mountain fire as a firefighter with the ODF.

“That was one of the first big fires I was involved in, and it left an impact on my mind,” Hessel said in a phone interview on Wednesday, July 21 from the Bootleg fire camp.

The Dooley Mountain fire affected Hessel in a couple of ways.

He remembers vividly the photograph that S. John Collins, retired Baker City Herald photojournalist, took from Main Street in downtown Baker City on July 30, 1989. The photo shows the fire’s smoke cloud looming above the city’s historic buildings, the angle of the lens making the blaze seem much closer than it was (the fire never got within about eight miles of town).

Hessel calls the photo an “iconic image.”

But that acreage figure — 20,000 — was memorable, too.

In 1989, its size made the Dooley Mountain fire an outlier.

It was a time when firefighters considered even a 500-acre fire a significant blaze.

But then Hessel, who started his firefighting career with ODF at age 16, compares Dooley Mountain to Bootleg.

“This fire grew an average of 30,000 acres for 13 days straight,” he said.

The Bootleg fire is the sort of blaze that requires a group of specialists — what’s known as an “overhead team” or “incident management team” — to coordinate the efforts of hundreds or even thousands of people, as well as bulldozers and other equipment on the ground, and air tankers and helicopters above.

Almost 2,400 people were assigned to the Bootleg fire.

Hessel, who heads one of the ODF’s three overhead teams, said they have been called out more often, and for longer periods, over the past several years.

He said it has become increasingly difficult for agencies to find employees willing to potentially give up much of their summer, to forego family vacations in favor of traveling hundreds of miles to work on a big blaze.

“We used to go out maybe only once in a summer,” Hessel said. “One of our teams was out five times last year.”

The Bootleg fire is his team’s second assignment this summer. The first, also in Klamath County, was the Cutoff fire in June.

Hessel, whose dad was a Forest Service smokejumper and manager of the firefighting air center in La Grande while he was growing up, said incident management teams typically are assigned to a fire for 14 days, with the potential to extend the stay to 21 days.

Team members then return home for a couple days.

Hessel, who was sent to the Bootleg fire on July 10, said he doubts he’ll return home before July 27.

And after his time off, he said his team will be “back on the board” — meaning they’re available to be assigned to another fire.

And with most of Oregon enduring extreme fire danger, Hessel doesn’t expect to wait long for his next job.

“It’s become a recurring theme every summer,” he said.

Sours: https://www.oregonlive.com/wildfires/2021/07/baker-city-man-leading-effort-to-stop-nations-biggest-wildfire.html
House Fire on the Corner of 7th and Carter in Baker City, Oregon

Irina Vasilievna grunted and returned to the agreement. Swallow sperm. - She looked at the man intently. He raised his hand: This is not oral sex.

Now discussing:

The same Petka was taking Zoya to Vladivostok, constantly holding her right palm on her knee. They stopped halfway and entered a small diner by the road. After eating and drinking, they drove away from the diner for a couple of kilometers and. Petka asked: Does Comrade Major want nothing more. Wants.



10241 10242 10243 10244 10245