Potassium chloride medication side effects

Potassium chloride medication side effects DEFAULT

potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride

What is the most important information I should know about potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride?

You should not use this medication if you have kidney failure, Addison's disease, severe burns or other tissue injury, if you are dehydrated, if you take certain diuretics (water pills), or if you have high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia).

Do not chew the effervescent tablet or swallow it whole. It must be dissolved in water or fruit juice before you take it.

Avoid lying down for at least 30 minutes after you take this medication.

Take this medication with food or just after a meal.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Your heart rate may also be checked using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG), which measures electrical activity of the heart. This will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with potassium. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Serious side effects of potassium include uneven heartbeat, muscle weakness or limp feeling, severe stomach pain, and numbness or tingling in your hands, feet, or mouth.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking potassium suddenly, your condition may become worse.

What is potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride?

Potassium is a mineral that is found in many foods and is needed for several functions of your body, especially the beating of your heart.

Potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride is used to prevent or to treat low blood levels of potassium (hypokalemia). Potassium levels can be low as a result of a disease or from taking certain medicines, or after a prolonged illness with diarrhea or vomiting.

Potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride may also be used for other purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride?

You should not use this medication if you are allergic to it, or if you have certain conditions. Be sure your doctor knows if you have:

  • high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia);
  • kidney failure;
  • Addison's disease (an adrenal gland disorder);
  • a large tissue injury such as a severe burn;
  • if you are severely dehydrated; or
  • if you are taking a "potassium-sparing" diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride (Midamor, Moduretic), spironolactone (Aldactone, Aldactazide), triamterene (Dyrenium, Dyazide, Maxzide).

Before using potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride, tell your doctor if you are allergic to any drugs, or if you have:

  • kidney disease;
  • heart disease or high blood pressure;
  • a blockage in your stomach or intestines; or
  • chronic diarrhea (such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease).

If you have any of these conditions, you may need a dose adjustment or special tests to safely take potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride.

FDA pregnancy category C. This medication may be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

It is not known whether potassium passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medication without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride?

Take this medication exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not take it in larger amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Do not chew the effervescent tablet or swallow it whole.

Drop the tablet into a glass and add at least 4 ounces (one-half cup) of cold water or fruit juice. When the tablet has completely dissolved, begin drinking the mixture slowly, over 5 to 10 minutes in all.

To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

The powder form of this medication should be mixed with at least 4 ounces (one-half cup) of cold water or fruit juice before taking. Drink the mixture slowly, over 5 to 10 minutes in all. To make sure you get the entire dose, add a little more water to the same glass, swirl gently and drink right away.

Take this medication with food or just after a meal.

Your treatment may include a special diet. It is very important to follow the diet plan created for you by your doctor or nutrition counselor. You should become very familiar with the list of foods you should eat or avoid to help control your condition.

Potassium-rich foods include: squash, baked potatoes (skin on), spinach, lentils, broccoli, brussels sprouts, zucchini, kidney or navy beans, raisins, watermelon, orange juice, bananas, cantaloupe, and low-fat milk or yogurt. Consume only the daily amounts recommended by your doctor or nutrition counselor.

To be sure this medication is helping your condition, your blood may need to be tested often. Your heart rate may also be checked using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG) to measure electrical activity of the heart. This test will help your doctor determine how long to treat you with potassium. Do not miss any scheduled appointments.

Do not stop taking this medication without first talking to your doctor. If you stop taking potassium suddenly, your condition may become worse.

Store potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride at room temperature away from moisture and heat. Keep the medication in a closed container.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. If it is almost time for your next dose, wait until then to take the medicine and skip the missed dose. Do not take extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention if you think you have used too much of this medicine.

Overdose symptoms may include heavy feeling in your arms or legs, confusion, weak or shallow breathing, slow or uneven heartbeat, seizure (convulsions), or feeling like you might pass out.

What should I avoid while taking potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride?

Avoid lying down for at least 30 minutes after you take this medication.

Avoid taking potassium supplements or using other products that contain potassium without first asking your doctor. Salt substitutes or low-salt dietary products often contain potassium. If you take certain products together you may accidentally get too much potassium. Read the label of any other medicine you are using to see if it contains potassium.

What other drugs will affect potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride?

The following drugs can interact with potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride. Tell your doctor if you are using any of these:

  • eplerenone (Inspra);
  • digoxin (digitalis, Lanoxin);
  • quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex, Quin-Release);
  • a bronchodilator such as ipratroprium (Atrovent) or tiotropium (Spiriva);
  • an ACE inhibitor such as benazepril (Lotensin), captopril (Capoten), fosinopril (Monopril), enalapril (Vasotec), lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril), moexipril (Univasc), perindopril (Aceon), quinapril (Accupril), ramipril (Altace), or trandolapril (Mavik); or
  • any type of diuretic (water pill) such as bumetanide (Bumex), chlorothiazide (Diuril), chlorthalidone (Hygroton, Thalitone), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ, HydroDiuril, Hyzaar, Lopressor, Vasoretic, Zestoretic), indapamide (Lozol), metolazone (Mykrox, Zarxolyn), or torsemide (Demadex).

This list is not complete and there may be other drugs that can interact with potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride. Tell your doctor about all your prescription and over-the-counter medications, vitamins, minerals, herbal products, and drugs prescribed by other doctors. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about potassium bicarbonate and potassium chloride.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 4.03. Revision date: 12/15/2010.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Sours: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d03960a1

potassium chloride (oral/injection)

What is the most important information I should know about potassium chloride?

You should not use this medicine if you have high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia), or if you also take a "potassium-sparing" diuretic.

What is potassium chloride?

Potassium is a mineral that is needed for several functions of your body, especially the beating of your heart.

Potassium chloride is used to prevent or to treat low blood levels of potassium (hypokalemia). Potassium levels can be low as a result of a disease or from taking certain medicines, or after a prolonged illness with diarrhea or vomiting.

Potassium chloride may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking potassium chloride?

You should not use potassium chloride if you are allergic to it, or if:

  • you have high levels of potassium in your blood (hyperkalemia); or
  • you take a "potassium-sparing" diuretic (water pill) such as amiloride, spironolactone, or triamterene.

Tell your doctor if you have ever had:

  • heart problems;
  • high blood pressure;
  • liver or kidney disease;
  • a large tissue injury such as a severe burn;
  • an electrolyte imbalance (such as low levels of calcium or magnesium in your blood);
  • trouble swallowing;
  • slow digestion;
  • stomach bleeding, an ulcer, or a blockage in your stomach or intestines;
  • an adrenal gland disorder;
  • diabetes; or
  • severe dehydration.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or breastfeeding.

How should I take potassium chloride?

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Potassium chloride oral is taken by mouth. Potassium chloride injection is given as a slow infusion into a vein.

A healthcare provider will give you this medicine by injection if you have severely low potassium levels. Tell your caregivers if you feel any burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when potassium chloride is injected.

Take oral potassium chloride with food if the medicine upsets your stomach.

Always follow directions on the medicine label about giving this medicine to a child.

Take the tablet or capsule with a full glass of water.

Do not crush, chew, or suck on a potassium tablet or capsule. Sucking on the pill could irritate your mouth or throat.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon). Mix the oral solution with least 4 ounces of water before taking it.

You may need to follow a special diet while using potassium chloride. Follow all instructions of your doctor or dietitian. Learn about the foods to eat or avoid to help control your condition.

Call your doctor if you have trouble swallowing a potassium chloride capsule or tablet. You may be able to dissolve the tablet in water, or mix the medicine from a capsule with soft food. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions.

You may need frequent medical tests. Your heart function may need to be checked using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG). Even if you have no symptoms, tests can help your doctor determine if this medicine is effective.

Some tablets are made with a shell that is not absorbed or melted in the body. Part of this shell may appear in your stool. This is normal and will not make the medicine less effective.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the medication in a closed container.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include stomach pain, vomiting, irregular heartbeats, chest pain, muscle weakness, loss of movement, numbness or tingling, or feeling light-headed.

What should I avoid while taking potassium chloride?

Do not use potassium supplements or other products that contain potassium, unless your doctor has told you to. Salt substitutes or low-salt foods often contain potassium. Read the label of any food or medicine to see if it contains potassium.

What other drugs will affect potassium chloride?

Tell your doctor about all your other medicines, especially:

  • medicine to prevent organ transplant rejection;
  • a diuretic or "water pill"; or
  • heart or blood pressure medication.

This list is not complete. Other drugs may affect potassium chloride, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Not all possible drug interactions are listed here.

Where can I get more information?

Your pharmacist can provide more information about potassium chloride.

Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided by Cerner Multum, Inc. ('Multum') is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. Drug information contained herein may be time sensitive. Multum information has been compiled for use by healthcare practitioners and consumers in the United States and therefore Multum does not warrant that uses outside of the United States are appropriate, unless specifically indicated otherwise. Multum's drug information does not endorse drugs, diagnose patients or recommend therapy. Multum's drug information is an informational resource designed to assist licensed healthcare practitioners in caring for their patients and/or to serve consumers viewing this service as a supplement to, and not a substitute for, the expertise, skill, knowledge and judgment of healthcare practitioners. The absence of a warning for a given drug or drug combination in no way should be construed to indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective or appropriate for any given patient. Multum does not assume any responsibility for any aspect of healthcare administered with the aid of information Multum provides. The information contained herein is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. If you have questions about the drugs you are taking, check with your doctor, nurse or pharmacist.

Copyright 1996-2021 Cerner Multum, Inc. Version: 14.01. Revision date: 5/28/2020.

Your use of the content provided in this service indicates that you have read, understood and agree to the End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by End-User License Agreement, which can be accessed by clicking on this link.

Sours: https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/d00345a1
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Potassium

pronounced as (poe tass' i um)

Potassium is essential for the proper functioning of the heart, kidneys, muscles, nerves, and digestive system. Usually the food you eat supplies all of the potassium you need. However, certain diseases (e.g., kidney disease and gastrointestinal disease with vomiting and diarrhea) and drugs, especially diuretics ('water pills'), remove potassium from the body. Potassium supplements are taken to replace potassium losses and prevent potassium deficiency.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Potassium comes in oral liquid, powder, granules, effervescent tablets, regular tablets, extended-release (long-acting) tablets, and extended-release capsules. It usually is taken two to four times a day, with or immediately after meals. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take potassium exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Take all forms of potassium with a full glass of water or fruit juice.

Add the liquid to water. Dissolve the powder, granules, or effervescent tablets in cold water or fruit juice according to the manufacturer's directions or the directions on your prescription label; mix the drug well just before you take it. Cold liquids help mask the unpleasant taste.

Swallow extended-release tablets and capsules whole. Do not chew them or dissolve them in your mouth.

Before taking potassium,

  • tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to potassium or any other drugs.
  • tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors such as captopril (Capoten), enalapril (Vasotec),and lisinopril (Prinivil, Zestril); diuretics ('water pills'); and vitamins. Do not take potassium if you are taking amiloride (Midamor), spironolactone (Aldactone), or triamterene (Dyrenium).
  • tell your doctor if you have or have ever had heart, kidney, or Addison's (adrenal gland) disease.
  • tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking potassium, call your doctor.
  • if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking potassium.

If you are using a salt substitute, tell your doctor. Many salt substitutes contain potassium. Your doctor will consider this source in determining your dose of potassium supplement. Your doctor may advise you to use a potassium-containing salt substitute and to eat potassium-rich foods (e.g., bananas, prunes, raisins, and milk).

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it and take any remaining doses for that day at evenly spaced intervals. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom).

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website (http://goo.gl/c4Rm4p) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

It is important to keep all medication out of sight and reach of children as many containers (such as weekly pill minders and those for eye drops, creams, patches, and inhalers) are not child-resistant and young children can open them easily. To protect young children from poisoning, always lock safety caps and immediately place the medication in a safe location – one that is up and away and out of their sight and reach. http://www.upandaway.org

In case of overdose, call the poison control helpline at 1-800-222-1222. Information is also available online at https://www.poisonhelp.org/help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, immediately call emergency services at 911.

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to potassium. You may have electrocardiograms (EKGs) and blood tests to see if your dose needs to be changed.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

  • Glu-K®
  • K+ 10®
  • K+ 8®
  • K+ Care®
  • K+ Care® Effervescent Tablets
  • Kaochlor® 10%
  • Kaon® Elixir
  • Kaon-Cl® 20% Elixir
  • Kaon-Cl-10®
  • Kay Ciel®
  • K-Dur® 10
  • K-Dur® 20
  • K-Lor®
  • Klor-Con® 10
  • Klor-Con® 8
  • Klor-Con® Powder
  • Klor-Con®/25 Powder
  • Klor-Con®/EF
  • Klotrix®
  • K-Lyte/CL® 50 Effervescent Tablets
  • K-Lyte/CL® Effervescent Tablets
  • K-Lyte® DS Effervescent Tablets
  • K-Lyte® Effervescent Tablets
  • K-Tab® Filmtab®
  • Micro-K®
  • Quic-K®
  • Rum-K®
  • Slow-K®
  • Tri-K®
  • Twin-K®
Last Revised - 11/15/2015

Browse Drugs and Medicines

Sours: https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a601099.html
Hyperkalemia: Causes, Effects on the Heart, Pathophysiology, Treatment, Animation.

Potassium Chloride (Kato)

Follow all directions on your prescription label and read all medication guides or instruction sheets. Your doctor may occasionally change your dose. Use the medicine exactly as directed.

Potassium chloride oral is taken by mouth. Potassium chloride injection is given as a slow infusion into a vein.

A healthcare provider will give you this medicine by injection if you have severely low potassium levels. Tell your caregivers if you feel any burning, pain, or swelling around the IV needle when potassium chloride is injected.

Take oral potassium chloride with food if the medicine upsets your stomach.

Always follow directions on the medicine label about giving this medicine to a child.

Take the tablet or capsule with a full glass of water.

Do not crush, chew, or suck on a potassium tablet or capsule. Sucking on the pill could irritate your mouth or throat.

Measure liquid medicine carefully. Use the dosing syringe provided, or use a medicine dose-measuring device (not a kitchen spoon). Mix the oral solution with least 4 ounces of water before taking it.

You may need to follow a special diet while using potassium chloride. Follow all instructions of your doctor or dietitian. Learn about the foods to eat or avoid to help control your condition.

Call your doctor if you have trouble swallowing a potassium chloride capsule or tablet. You may be able to dissolve the tablet in water, or mix the medicine from a capsule with soft food. Carefully follow your doctor's instructions.

You may need frequent medical tests. Your heart function may need to be checked using an electrocardiograph or ECG (sometimes called an EKG). Even if you have no symptoms, tests can help your doctor determine if this medicine is effective.

Some tablets are made with a shell that is not absorbed or melted in the body. Part of this shell may appear in your stool. This is normal and will not make the medicine less effective.

Store at room temperature away from moisture, heat, and light. Keep the medication in a closed container.

What should I do if I missed a dose of Potassium Chloride (Kato)?

Take the medicine as soon as you can, but skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next dose. Do not take two doses at one time.

Sours: https://www.everydayhealth.com/drugs/potassium-chloride

Effects side chloride potassium medication

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Slightly less than half was able to take in the tormented ass.

Hyperkalemia: Causes, Effects on the Heart, Pathophysiology, Treatment, Animation.

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Lyudka stayed at home to talk about breakfast near the stove. I left the house, climbed the hill and was about to go down from it, when suddenly something either knocked, or rattled, or. Clanked in my head - look around. I took it and looked around.



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