Boy scout joining requirements 2016

Boy scout joining requirements 2016 DEFAULT

Boy Scout Joining Requirements
(Scout Badge)

Scout BadgeScout Badge

Scout
Rank Requirements


Requirements were REVISED effective January 1, 2016.

New text is in bold GREEN underlined Serif text like this sentence.
Deleted portions are struck through RED italic text like this sentence.

To see the requirements, without the changes highlighted,Click here.

For the previous requirements, Click here.


Transition rules for the Scout rank:

  • For 2016:
    • Boys joining on or after Jan. 1, 2016, MUST use the new requirements.
    • Boys who joined prior to Jan. 1, 2016, MAY continue to work using the previous requirements, but MUST convert to the new requirements upon attaining First Class.
  • After 2016:
    • All Scouts MUST use the new requirements for all ranks.

The "Boy Scout Application" mentioned in item 2 is the "BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA YOUTH APPLICATION" (524-406A). The instructions on that form reference a "personal health history, No. 521-006", which used to appear on the back of the last page of the application form, and has apparently been discontinued. As a substitute, use parts A & B of the Annual Health and Medical Record (680-001) for the health history. Copies of these forms can be downloaded from BSA using the links below.

All requirements for Scout rank must be completed as a member of a troop. If you already completed these requirements as part of the Webelos Scouting Adventure, simply demonstrate your knowledge or skills to your Scoutmaster or other designated leader after joining the troop.


  1. Meet age requirements: Be a boy who is 11 years old, or one who has completed the fifth grade or earned the Arrow of Light Award and is at least 10 years old, but is not yet 18 years old.
    1. Repeat from memory the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. In your own words, explain their meaning.
    2. Explain what Scout spirit is. Describe some ways you have shown Scout spirit by practicing the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan.
    3. Demonstrate the Boy Scout sign, salute, and handshake. Explain when they should be used.
    4. Describe the First Class Scout badge and tell what each part stands for. Explain the significance of the First Class Scout badge.
    5. Repeat from memory the Outdoor Code. In your own words, explain what the Outdoor Code means to you.
    6. Repeat from memory the Pledge of Allegiance. In your own words, explain its meaning.
  2. Complete a Boy Scout application and health history signed by your parent or guardian.
    After attending at least one Boy Scout troop meeting, do the following:
    1. Describe how the Scouts in the troop provide its leadership.
    2. Describe the four steps of Boy Scout advancement.
    3. Describe what the Boy Scout ranks are and how they are earned.
    4. Describe what merit badges are and how they are earned.
  3. Find a Scout troop near your home. (To find a troop, contact your local Boy Scout Council. The Council name, address and phone number can be found on BSA's Council Locator Page.)
    1. Explain the patrol method. Describe the types of patrols that are used in your troop.
    2. Become familiar with your patrol name, emblem, flag, and yell. Explain how these items create patrol spirit.
  4. Repeat the Pledge of Allegiance.
    1. Show how to tie a square knot, two half-hitches, and a taut-line hitch. Explain how each knot is used.
    2. Show the proper care of a rope by learning how to whip and fuse the ends of different kinds of rope.
  5. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handshake.
    Demonstrate your knowledge of pocketknife safety.
  6. Demonstrate tying the square knot (a joining knot).
    7. Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath or Promise, Scout Law, motto, and slogan, and the Outdoor Code.
    8. Describe the Scout badge.
    9. Complete the Pamphlet Exercises.
    With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet "How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent's Guide" and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade.1
  7. 10. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. Turn in your Boy Scout application and health history form signed by your parent or guardian, thenSince joining the troop and while working on the Scout rank, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

Notes:

For Varsity Scouts working on Boy Scout requirements, replace "troop" with "team", and "Scoutmaster" with "Varsity Scout Coach."

The requirements for the Scout, Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks may be worked on simultaneously; however, these ranks must be earned in sequence.

1 If your family does not have internet access at home AND you do not have ready internet access at school or another public place or via a mobile device, the Cyber Chip portion of the requirement may be waived by your Scoutmaster in consultation with your parent or guardian.  


Source: 2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements (524-012)


Note that until January 1, 2016, the Scout badge iswas NOT considered a "Rank" by BSA,
and the color of the fleur-de-lis on the Scout badge changed from Brown to Gold as of January 1, 2016.


Page updated on: February 03, 2019


Sours: http://usscouts.org/usscouts/advance/boyscout/changes/bsrank1-16.asp

Boy Scout Advancement

Tenderfoot

CAMPING AND OUTDOOR ETHICS

  1. Present yourself to your leader prepared for an overnight camping trip. Show the personal and camping gear you will use. Show the right way to pack and carry it.
  2. Spend at least one night on a patrol or troop campout. Sleep in a tent you have helped pitch.
  3. Tell how you practiced the Outdoor Code on a campout or outing.

COOKING

  1. On the campout, assist in preparing one of the meals. Tell why it is important for each patrol member to share in meal preparation and cleanup.
  2. While on a campout, demonstrate the appropriate method of safely cleaning items used to prepare, serve, and eat a meal.
  3. Explain the importance of eating together as a patrol.

TOOLS

  1. Demonstrate a practical use of the square knot.
  2. Demonstrate a practical use of two half-hitches.
  3. Demonstrate a practical use of the taut line hitch.
  4. Demonstrate proper care, sharpening, and use of the knife, saw, and ax. Describe when each should be used.

FIRST AID AND NATURE

  1. Show first aid for the following:
    • Simple cuts and scrapes
    • Blisters on the hand and foot
    • Minor (thermal/heat) burns or scalds (superficial, or first degree)
    • Bites or stings of insects or ticks
    • Venomous snakebite
    • Nosebleed
    • Frostbite and sunburn
    • Choking
  2. Describe common poisonous or hazardous plants, identify any that grow in your local area or campsite location. Tell how to treat for exposure to them.
  3. Tell what you can do on a campout or other outdoor activity to prevent or reduce the occurrence of injuries or exposure listed in Tenderfoot requirements 4a and 4b.
  4. Assemble a personal first-aid kit to carry with you on future campouts and hikes. Tell how each item in the kit would be used.

HIKING

  1. Explain the importance of the buddy system as it relates to your personal safety on outings and in your neighborhood. Use the buddy system while on a troop or patrol outing.
  2. Explain what to do if you become lost on a hike or campout.
  3. Explain the rules of safe hiking, both on the highway and cross-country, during the day and at night.

FITNESS

  1. Record your best in the following tests:
    1. Pushups : Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds
    2. Situps or curl-ups: Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds
    3. Back-saver sit-and-reach: Record the distance stretched
    4. 1 mile walk/run: (Record the time)
  2. Develop and describe a plan for improvement in each of the activities listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a. Keep track of your activity for at least 30 days.
  3. Show improvement (of any degree) in each activity listed in Tenderfoot requirement 6a after practicing for 30 days.
    1. Pushups:  Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds)
    2. Situps or curl-ups: Record the number done correctly in 60 seconds
    3. Back-saver sit-and-reach: Record the distance stretched
    4. 1 mile walk/run: (Record the time)

CITIZENSHIP

  1. Demonstrate how to display, raise, lower, and fold the U.S. flag.
  2. Participate in a total of one hour of service in one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout slogan and Scout motto.

LEADERSHIP

  1. Describe the steps in Scouting’s Teaching EDGE method. Use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another person how to tie the square knot.

SCOUT SPIRIT

  1. Demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law in your everyday life.
  2. While working toward Tenderfoot rank, and after completing Scout rank requirement 7, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  3. Successfully complete your board of review for the Tenderfoot rank.

Second Class

CAMPING AND OUTDOOR ETHICS

    1. Since joining, participate in five separate troop/patrol activities, three of which include overnight camping. These five activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least two of the three campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.)
    2. Explain the principles of Leave No Trace, and tell how you practiced them while on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c.
    3. On one of these campouts, select a location for your patrol site and recommend it to your patrol leader, senior patrol leader, or troop guide. Explain what factors you should consider when choosing a patrol site and where to pitch a tent.
  • COOKING and TOOLS
      1. Explain when it is appropriate to use a fire for cooking or other purposes and when it would not be appropriate to do so.
      2. Use the tools listed in Tenderfoot requirement 3d to prepare tinder, kindling, and fuel wood for a cooking fire.
      3. At an approved outdoor location and time, use the tinder, kindling, and fuel wood from Second Class requirement 2b to demonstrate how to build a fire. Unless prohibited by local fire restrictions, light the fire. After allowing the flames to burn safely for at least two minutes, safely extinguish the flames with minimal impact to the fire site.
      4. Explain when it is appropriate to use a lightweight stove and when it is appropriate to use a propane stove. Set up a lightweight stove or propane stove. Light the stove, unless prohibited by local fire restrictions. Describe the safety procedures for using these types of stoves.
      5. On one campout, plan and cook one hot breakfast or lunch, selecting foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model. Explain the importance of good nutrition. Demonstrate how to transport, store, and prepare the foods you selected.
      6. Demonstrate how to tie the sheet bend knot. Describe a situation in which you would use this knot.
      7. Demonstrate how to tie the bowline knot. Describe a situation in which you would use this knot.
  • NAVIGATION
      1. Demonstrate how a compass works and how to orient a map. Use a map to point out and tell the meaning of five map symbols.
      2. Using a compass and a map together, take a five-mile hike (or 10 miles by bike) approved by your adult leader and your parent or guardian.2
      3. Describe some hazards or injuries that you might encounter on your hike and what you can do to help prevent them.2
      4. Demonstrate how to find directions during the day and at night without using a compass or an electronic device.
  • NATURE
    1. Identify or show evidence of at least ten kinds of wild animals (such as birds, mammals, reptiles, fish, mollusks) found in your local area or camping location. You may show evidence by tracks, signs, or photographs you have taken.
  • AQUATICS
      1. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe swim.
      2. Demonstrate your ability to pass the BSA beginner test.  Jump feetfirst into water over your head in depth, level off and swim 25 feet on the surface, stop, turn sharply, resume swimming, then return to your starting place.
      3. Demonstrate water rescue methods by reaching with your arm or leg, by reaching with a suitable object, and by throwing lines and objects.
      4. Explain why swimming rescues should not be attempted when a reaching or throwing rescue is possible. Explain why and how a rescue swimmer should avoid contact with the victim.
  • FIRST AID
      1. Demonstrate first aid for the following:
        • Object in the eye
        • Bite of a warm blooded animal
        • Puncture wounds from a splinter, nail, and fishhook
        • Serious burns (partial thickness, or second degree)
        • Heat exhaustion
        • Shock
        • Heatstroke, dehydration, hypothermia, and hyperventilation
      2. Show what to do for “hurry” cases of stopped breathing, stroke, severe bleeding, and ingested poisoning.
      3. Tell what you can do while on a campout or hike to prevent or reduce the occurrence of the injuries listed in Second Class requirements 6a and 6b.
      4. Explain what to do in case of accidents that require emergency response in the home and the backcountry. Explain what constitutes an emergency and what information you will need to provide to a responder.
      5. Tell how you should respond if you come upon the scene of a vehicular accident.
  • FITNESS
      1. After competing Tenderfoot requirement 6c, be physically active at least 30 minutes a day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.
      2. Share your challenges and successes in completing Second Class requirement 7a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life and develop a plan for doing so.
      3. Participate in a school, community, or troop program on the dangers of using drugs, alcohol, and tobacco, and other practices that could be harmful to your health. Discuss your participation in the program with your family, and explain the dangers of substance addictions. Report to your Scoutmaster or other adult leader in your troop about which parts of the Scout Oath and Law relate to what you learned.
  • CITIZENSHIP
      1. Participate in a flag ceremony for your school, religious institution, chartered organization, community, or Scouting activity.
      2. Explain what respect is due the flag of the United States.
      3. With your parents or guardian, decide on an amount of money that you would like to earn, based on the cost of a specific item you would like to purchase. Develop a plan written plan to earn the amount agreed upon and follow that plan; it is acceptable to make changes to your plan along the way. Discuss any changes made to your original plan and whether you met your goal.
      4. At a minimum of three locations, compare the cost of the item for which you are saving to determine the best place to purchase it. After completing Second Class requirement 8c, decide if you will use the amount that you earned as originally intended, save all or part of it, or use it for another purpose.
      5. Participate in two hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. Tell how your service to others relates to the Scout Oath.
  • LEADERSHIP
      1. Explain the three R’s of personal safety and protection.
      2. Describe bullying; tell what the appropriate response is to one who might be bullying you or bullying another person.
  • SCOUT SPIRIT
    1. Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (not to include those used for Tenderfoot requirement 9) in your everyday life.
    2. While working toward Second Class rank, and after completing Tenderfoot requirement 10, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
    3. Successfully complete your board of review for the Second Class rank.

First Class

CAMPING AND OUTDOOR ETHICS

    1. Since joining, participate in 10 separate troop/patrol activities, six of which include overnight camping. These 10 activities do not include troop or patrol meetings. On at least five of the six campouts, spend the night in a tent that you pitch or other structure that you help erect. (such as a lean-to, snow cave, or tepee.)
    2. Explain each of the principles of Tread Lightly! and tell how you practiced them while on a campout or outing. This outing must be different from the one used for Tenderfoot requirement 1c and Second Class requirement 1b.

COOKING

    1. Help plan a menu for one of the above campouts that includes at least one breakfast, one lunch, and one dinner and that requires cooking at least two of the meals. Tell how the menu includes the foods from MyPlate or the current USDA nutrition model and how it meets nutritional needs for the planned activity or campout.
    2. Using the menu planned in First Class requirement 2a, make a list showing a budget and food amounts needed to feed three or more boys. Secure the ingredients.
    3. Show which pans, utensils, and other gear will be needed to cook and serve these meals.
    4. Demonstrate the procedures to follow in the safe handling and storage of fresh meats, dairy products, eggs, vegetables, and other perishable food products. Show how to properly dispose of camp garbage, cans, plastic containers, and other rubbish.
    5. On one campout, serve as cook. Supervise your assistant(s) in using a stove or building a cooking fire. Prepare the breakfast, lunch, and dinner planned in First Class requirement 2a. Supervise the cleanup.

TOOLS

    1. Discuss when you should and should not use lashings.
    2. Demonstrate tying the timber hitch and clove hitch.
    3. Demonstrate tying the square, shear, and diagonal lashings by joining two or more poles or staves together.
    4. Use lashings to make a useful camp gadget or structure.
  • NAVIGATION
      1. Using a map and compass, complete an orienteering course that covers at least one mile and requires measuring the height and/or width of designated items (tree, tower, canyon, ditch, etc.)
      2. Demonstrate how to use a handheld GPS unit, GPS app on a smartphone or other electronic navigation system. Use a GPS to find your current location, a destination of your choice, and the route you will take to get there. Follow that route to arrive at your destination.
  • NATURE
      1. Identify or show evidence of at least 10 kinds of native plants found in your local area or campsite location. You may show evidence by fallen leaves or fallen fruit that you find in the field, or as part of a collection you have made, or by photographs you have taken.
      2. Identify two ways to obtain a weather forecast for an upcoming activity. Explain why weather forecasts are important when planning for an event.
      3. Describe at least three natural indicators of impending hazardous weather, the potential dangerous events that might result from such weather conditions, and the appropriate actions to take.
      4. Describe extreme weather conditions you might encounter in the outdoors in your local geographic area. Discuss how you would determine ahead of time the potential risk of these types of weather dangers, alternative planning considerations to avoid such risks, and how you would prepare for and respond to those weather conditions.
  • AQUATICS
      1. Successfully complete the BSA swimmer test.3
      2. Tell what precautions must be taken for a safe trip afloat.
      3. Identify the basic parts of a canoe, kayak, or other boat. Identify the parts of a paddle or an oar.
      4. Describe proper body positioning in a watercraft, depending on the type and size of the vessel. Explain the importance of proper position.
      5. With a helper and a practice victim, show a line rescue both as tender and rescuer. (The practice victim should be approximately 30 feet from shore in deep water.)
  • FIRST AID AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS
      1. Demonstrate bandages for a sprained ankle and for injuries on the head, the upper arm, and the collarbone.
      2. By yourself and with a partner, show how to:
        • Transport a person from a smoke-filled room
        • Transport for at least 25 yards a person with a sprained ankle.
      3. Tell the five most common signals of a heart attack. Explain the steps (procedures) in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR).
      4. Tell what utility services exist in your home or meeting place. Describe potential hazards associated with these utilities, and tell how to respond in emergency situations.
      5. Develop an emergency action plan for your home that includes what to do in case of fire, storm, power outage, or water outage.
      6. Explain how to obtain potable water in an emergency.
  • FITNESS
      1. After completing Second Class requirement 7a, be physically active at least 30 minutes every day for five days a week for four weeks. Keep track of your activities.
      2. Share your challenges and successes in completing First Class requirement 8a. Set a goal for continuing to include physical activity as part of your daily life.
  • CITIZENSHIP
      1. Visit and discuss with a selected individual approved by your leader (for example, an elected official, judge, attorney, civil servant, principal, or teacher) the constitutional rights and obligations of a U.S. citizen.
      2. Investigate an environmental issue affecting your community. Share what you learned about that issue with your patrol or troop. Tell what, if anything, could be done by you or your community to address the concern.
      3. On a Scouting or family outing, take note of the trash and garbage you produce. Before your next similar outing, decide how you can reduce, recycle, or repurpose what you take on that outing, and then put those plans into action. Compare your results.
      4. Participate in three hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. The project(s) must not be the same service project(s) used for Tenderfoot requirement 7b and Second Class requirement 8e. Explain how your service to others relates to the Scout Law.
  • LEADERSHIP
    1. Tell someone who is eligible to join Boy Scouts, or an inactive Boy Scout, about your Scouting activities. Invite him to an outing, activity, service project or meeting. Tell him how to join, or encourage the inactive Boy Scout to become active. Share your efforts with your Scoutmaster or other adult leader.
  • SCOUT SPIRIT
    1. Demonstrate scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived four different points of the Scout Law (different from those points used for previous ranks) in your everyday life.
    2. While working toward First Class rank, and after completing Second Class requirement 11, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
    3. Successfully complete your board of review for the First Class rank.

Star

  1. Be active in your troop for at least four months as a First Class Scout.
  2. As a First Class Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn six merit badges, including any four from the required list for Eagle. You may choose any of the 17 merit badges on the required list for Eagle to fulfill this requirement. See Eagle rank requirement 3 for this list.Name of Merit Badge
    Date Earned

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

_________________________
_________________________

_________________________
_________________________

  • While a First Class Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster.
  • While a First Class Scout, serve actively in your troop for four months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a Scoutmaster assigned leadership project to help the troop):
    Boy Scout troop.
  • Patrol leader,
  • assistant senior patrol leader,
  • senior patrol leader,
  • troop guide,
  • Order of the Arrow troop representative,
  • den chief,
  • scribe,
  • librarian,
  • historian,
  • quartermaster,
  • bugler,
  • junior assistant Scoutmaster,
  • chaplain aide,
  • instructor,
  • webmaster, or
  • outdoor ethics guide 4

Varsity Scout team.

  • Captain,
  • co-captain,
  • program manager,
  • squad leader,
  • team secretary,
  • Order of the Arrow team representative,
  • librarian,
  • historian,
  • quartermaster,
  • chaplain aide,
  • instructor,
  • den chief,
  • webmaster, or
  • outdoor ethics guide

Venturing crew / Sea Scout ship.

  • President,
  • vice president,
  • secretary,
  • treasurer,
  • den chief,
  • quartermaster,
  • historian,
  • guide,
  • boatswain,
  • boatswain’s mate,
  • yeoman,
  • purser,
  • storekeeper, or
  • webmaster,

Lone Scout.

Leadership responsibility in your school, religious organization, club, or elsewhere in your community.

  • With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parents Guide” and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade.
  • While a First Class Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference
  • Successfully complete your board of review for the Star rank.

Life

  1. Be active in your troop for at least six months as a Star Scout.
  2. As a Star Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Earn five more merit badges (so that you have 11 in all), including any three additional badges from the required list for Eagle. You may choose any of the 17 merit badges on the required list for Eagle to fulfill this requirement. See Eagle rank requirement #3 for this list.Name of Merit Badge
    Date Earned

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

(Eagle required)
_________________________
_________________________

_________________________
_________________________

_________________________
_________________________

  • While a Star Scout, participate in six hours of service through one or more service projects approved by your Scoutmaster. At least 3 hours of this service must be conservation related.
  • While a Star Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility (or carry out a unit leader-assigned leadership project to help the troop):
    Boy Scout troop.
  • Patrol leader,
  • assistant senior patrol leader,
  • senior patrol leader,
  • troop guide,
  • Order of the Arrow troop representative,
  • den chief,
  • scribe,
  • librarian,
  • historian,
  • quartermaster,
  • bugler,
  • junior assistant Scoutmaster,
  • chaplain aide,
  • instructor,
  • webmaster, or
  • outdoor ethics guide

Varsity Scout team.

  • Captain,
  • co-captain,
  • program manager,
  • squad leader,
  • team secretary,
  • Order of the Arrow team representative,
  • librarian,
  • historian,
  • quartermaster,
  • chaplain aide,
  • instructor,
  • den chief,
  • webmaster, or
  • outdoor ethics guide

Venturing crew / Sea Scout ship.

  • President,
  • vice president,
  • secretary,
  • treasurer,
  • den chief,
  • quartermaster,
  • historian,
  • guide,
  • boatswain,
  • boatswain’s mate,
  • yeoman,
  • purser,
  • storekeeper, or
  • webmaster,

Lone Scout.

Leadership responsibility in your school, religious organization, club, or elsewhere in your community.

  • While a Star Scout, use the Teaching EDGE method to teach another Scout (preferably younger than you) the skills from ONE of the following choices, so that he is prepared to pass those requirements to his Scoutmaster’s satisfaction.
    1. Tenderfoot – 4a and 4b (first aid)
    2. Second Class – 2b, 2c, and 2d (cooking/camping)
    3. Second Class – 3a and 3d(navigation)
    4. First Class – 3a, 3b, 3c, and 3d (tools)
    5. First Class – 4a and 4b (navigation)
    6. Second Class – 6a and 6b (first aid)
    7. First Class – 7a and 7b (first aid)
    8. Three requirements from one of the required Eagle merit badges, as approved by your Scoutmaster.
  • While a Star Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference
  • Successfully complete your board of review for the Life rank.

Eagle

  1. Be active in your troop for a period of at least six months as a Life Scout.
  2. As a Life Scout, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God, how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life, and how your understanding of the Scout Oath and Scout Law will guide your life in the future. List on your Eagle Scout Rank Application the names of individuals who know you personally and would be willing to provide a recommendation on your behalf, including parents/guardians, religious (if not affiliated with an organized religion, then the parent or guardian provides this reference), educational, employer (if employed), and two other references.
  3. Earn a total of 21 merit badges (10 more than required for the Life rank), including these 13 merit badges:
    1. First Aid
    2. Citizenship in the Community
    3. Citizenship in the Nation
    4. Citizenship in the World
    5. Communication
    6. Cooking
    7. Personal Fitness
    8. Emergency Preparedness OR Lifesaving
    9. Environmental Science OR Sustainability
    10. Personal Management
    11. Swimming OR Hiking OR Cycling
    12. Camping, and
    13. Family Life

    You must choose only one of the merit badges listed in categories h, i, and k. Any additional merit badge(s) earned in those categories may be counted as one of your eight optional merit badges used to make your total of 21.

    Name of Merit Badge:
    Date Earned:

    1.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    2.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    3.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    4.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    5.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    6.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    7.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    8.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    9.
    _________________________
    _________________________

    10.
    _________________________
    _________________________

  4. While a Life Scout, serve actively in your troop for six months in one or more of the following positions of responsibility:9

    Boy Scout troop.

    • Patrol leader,
    • assistant senior patrol leader,
    • senior patrol leader,
    • troop guide,
    • Order of the Arrow troop representative,
    • den chief,
    • scribe,
    • librarian,
    • historian,
    • quartermaster,
    • junior assistant Scoutmaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide.

    Varsity Scout team.

    • Captain,
    • co-captain,
    • program manager,
    • squad leader,
    • team secretary,
    • Order of the Arrow team representative,
    • librarian,
    • historian
    • quartermaster,
    • chaplain aide,
    • instructor,
    • den chief.
    • webmaster, or
    • outdoor ethics guide.

    Venturing crew / Sea Scout ship.

    • President,
    • vice president,
    • secretary,
    • treasurer,
    • quartermaster
    • historian
    • den chief,
    • guide
    • boatswain,
    • boatswain’s mate,
    • yeoman,
    • purser,
    • storekeeper, or
    • webmaster

    Lone Scout. Leadership responsibility in your school, religious organization, club, or elsewhere in your community.

  5. While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The project must benefit an organization other than the Boy Scouts of America.) A project proposal must be approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your Scoutmaster and unit committee, and the council or district before you start. You must use the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, BSA publication No. 512-927, in meeting this requirement. (To learn more about the Eagle Scout service project, see the Guide to Advancement, topics 9.0.2.0 through 9.0.2.15.)
  6. While a Life Scout, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

In preparation for your board of review, prepare and attach to your Eagle Scout Rank Application a statement of your ambitions and life purpose and a listing of positions held in your religious institution, school, camp, community, or other organizations, during which you demonstrated leadership skills. Include honors and awards received during this service.

  1. Successfully complete your board of review for the Eagle Scout rank. (This requirement may be met after age 18 in accordance with Guide to Advancement, topic 8.0.3.1.)

EAGLE PALMS

After becoming an Eagle Scout, you may earn Palms by completing the following requirements:

  1. Be active in your troop and patrol for at least 3 months after becoming an Eagle Scout or after the award of last Palm.**
  2. Since earning the Eagle Scout rank or your last Eagle Palm, demonstrate Scout spirit by living the Scout Oath and Scout Law. Tell how you have done your duty to God and how you have lived the Scout Oath and Scout Law in your everyday life.
  3. Make a satisfactory effort to develop and demonstrate leadership ability.
  4. Earn five additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or last Palm.***.
  5. While an Eagle Scout participate in a Scoutmaster conference.
  6. Successfully complete your board of review for the Eagle Palm.
Sours: https://www.lpcbsa.org/advancement/boy-scout-advancement/
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Scout Joining



Comments:
 

Jun 18, 2016 - Mathews Mpumelelo Nyembezi

I'm a South African gentleman who would only like to you to help me help boys,in South African communities.I would love so much build our children with survival strategies in the fields.Please help me to raise boys become better citizens and the brilliant leaders of the future.


Sep 28, 2016 - Scott Filson

Hello,  we are going on a campout October 17 18 19.   I would like to bring my HAM radio set and try to contact some scouts on the early evening on the 18th.  If you are interested we can determine a time and frequency to meet.  Please contact me at [email protected]



Boy Scouts

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This site is not officially associated with the Boy Scouts of America


 
 
 
Sours: https://www.boyscouttrail.com/boy-scouts/scout-scouts.asp
2019 Scouts BSA Advancement Process

Scout Joining



Comments:
 

Mar 21, 2014 - Trace

Do we know if the Scout level is officially a rank *currently* or is there a date this will start?  I saw your posting on the changes to BSA (this being one of them) but I couldn't figure out when it officially starts.  Thanks!


Apr 07, 2014 - Justin

Trace, the changes for Boy Scouts go into effect January 2016.  that starts the transition period.  the new requirements, including when the Scout badge becomes an official Rank, becomes effective January of 2017.  please see the following link describing all changes and dates: www.scouting.org/filestore/program_update/pdf/2014-2015_Program_Change_Overview_v8.pdf


Apr 24, 2014 - Mike

If a boy earns his AoL, does he automatically receive his scout award after crossing over or does he need another SM conference and/or to demonstrate that he has met the "joining" requirements?


Apr 25, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Mike - As a Scoutmaster, I have the new scouts demonstrate the requirements to me when we meet for requirement #10.  I have no idea what the Webelos den leader required of the scout to receive the Arrow of Light award.  If the scout knows his stuff, it should take less than 5 minutes to do requirements 4 through 8.


Nov 29, 2014 - Gracie

If a boy gets his AOL but does not get awarded until Blue and Gold. Can he be in boys scouts and cub scouts simultaneously?  He wants move on to Boy Scouts but also wants to finish and cross over with his group.


Dec 01, 2014 - Scouter Paul

@Gracie - A boy is not a member of a Cub Scout Pack and a Boy Scout Troop at the same time.


Mar 17, 2015 - Sandra Martens

The above says "Scout Joining Requirements" As far as I know, a boy doesn't have to know how to tie knots, repeat the law, pledge, etc to JOIN.  It should say Scout requirements, and leave the word Joining out of it. If I was looking at having my son join Boy Scouts and saw this page (yes, I have recommended this website to non-Scout people) I'd stop thinking about joining What a shame.


Mar 17, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Sandra - I can understand how you could be concerned with the wording, even though it is correct. To become a member of the Boy Scouts of America, a youth needs to turn in a completed youth application, health record, and payment. To become a member of a Boy Scout Troop and wear the Scout badge, he needs to complete the Joining requirements described above. These Joining requirements are listed in the beginning of the Boy Scout Handbook as well as other BSA documentation, and are referred to as "Joining requirements".


Mar 17, 2015 - James Dance

My son just crossed over and will be attending  first Boy Scout meeting tonight.He made arrow of light (hurrah! )we made good use of this web siteand as a scout will be using it more. I find it more "scout friendly" can'tsay thanks enough for a very helpful site


Mar 17, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@James - Congrats to your son!  I expect you and he just learned tonight that Boy Scout troop meetings can seem chaotic and haphazard at times.   If you are welcome to observe these meetings, watching the Senior Patrol Leader and other scouts running things is enlightening.  Comparing the meetings run by a new SPL to those he runs near the end of his term can really demonstrate how opportunities to lead in Scouts help to grow good young men and leaders.


Sep 11, 2015 - James Lehman, Jr.

Aa a Scout Chaplain, I am sorry that BSA has essentially dropped the idea that the "oath "  can more rightfully be called a "promise". This is important to some faiths, as making a "judicial oath" is to be avoided. The older Scout Manuals ("Handbook for Boys") included this distinction in it's discussion of the requirements. By repeating it, one is not "swearing by" anything (an oath) but simply promising (affirming) that one will behave in a certain, right manner. I have discussed this many times with Scouts and parents.  See Mathew 5:35 etc.


Sep 21, 2015 - Scott Canaan

In looking at the 2016BoyScoutRequirements_8.14.2015 word document, I noticed that for the Scout Rank, the text "Meet the age requirements. Be a boy who is 11 years old, or one who has completed fifth grade or earned the Arrow of Light Award and is at least 10 years old, but is not yet 18 years old." is removed.  Do these rules still apply for joining?  If so, where have they been moved to?


Sep 21, 2015 - Scouter Paul

@Scott - Yes, the joining requirements still apply and they are still listed on the official BSA Youth Application (form 524-406).


Oct 05, 2020 - James Ward

Does a new Boy Scout use the Scout sign and salute before he obtains the rank of Scout?


Oct 07, 2020 - Jane

@James Ward - Yes, it is fine for new Scouts to use the Scout sign and salute prior to obtaining the rank of Scout.

Please note that these are the old requirements.  The new requirements for Scout rank are at the following link:

boyscouttrail.com/boy-scouts/scout-scouts.asp



Boy Scouts

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Sours: https://www.boyscouttrail.com/boy-scouts/scout-scouts-old.asp

2016 boy scout joining requirements

Preparing for the New Boy Scout Rank Requirements (2016)

BSA’s 411 Program Updates are nearly all in place except for Boy Scouting, which makes its final changes in January 2016. Of course, the first things you will notice are the new rank requirements. These were introduced last May but take full effect on January 1st ; Scouts joining on or after Jan. 1, 2016 MUST use the new requirements.

  • Boys who joined prior to Jan. 1, 2016 and who are working on the Scout badge may continue to work on the existing requirements, but must convert to the new requirements upon completion of the Scout badge.
  • Scouts who are working on Tenderfoot through First Classmay continue to work on the existing requirements, butmust convert to the new requirements upon attaining First Class.
  • Scouts have completed First Class may complete the rank they are currently working on in the existing requirements, but thenmust convert to the new requirements for subsequent ranks.

By the beginning of 2017, all Scouts must use the new requirements regardless of rank.trail to eagle

Based on the work of BSA’s National Strategic Plan Goal, the  411 Task Force developed these changes to insure that every rank refocuses on one of Scouting’s Aims: Character, Citizenship or Fitness.

Diane Cannon, a member of the 411 Task Force, explained, “There was really a desire to make sure that all our programs were focused on the right things. Fun for our youth, but also that the activities were supporting the aims and mission of our organization. As a result, every single rank requirement was looked at with the question being asked, ‘Does this requirement help to support at least one of the aims of BSA: character development, citizenship training, or personal fitness? Or does the requirement support one of the important tools that we use to teach the aims, like outdoor program or leadership development?’ And if the requirement didn’t support one of those, then the question was asked, ‘Why are we doing it?’”

She went on to explain that Boy and Varsity Scouting on needed small adjustments, while Cub Scouting and Venturing got an overhaul. She went on, “Scouts are going to find some new requirements, and there’s going to be a realignment of some of the Tenderfoot to First Class requirements, but the basic structure of the Boy Scout advancement program is going to remain unchanged. ”

The most complete set of resources listing the changes is available at “Program Updates – 2015 and Beyond” and are included in these links:

  • Notes on Transitioning to the New Requirements in 2016 | En Español
  • 2016 Boy Scout requirements—parallel comparison
    The 2016 Boy Scout rank requirements are now available for viewing. This document gives a parallel comparison of existing requirements and requirements that will be effective Jan. 1, 2016.
  • 2016 Boy Scout requirements FAQs
  • 2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements
  • 2016 Boy Scout Rank Requirements – Printable Insert
  • Latest New Merit Badge News and Counselor Resources
  • Program Features for Troops, Teams, and Crews
    Appendix
    Volume 1
    Volume 2
    Volumes 1 and 2 of the new Program Features for Troops, Teams, and Crews are now available at www.scoutstuff.org. Volume 3 will be available in early 2016. Each volume includes 16 program features with a mix of topics: outdoor, sports, health and safety, citizenship and personal development, STEM, and arts and hobbies. Leaders and youth members can use these to plan exciting programs, help facilitate advancement and personal growth, and keep youth members engaged.
  • Troop Leader Guidebook, Volume 1
    This new resource, which replaces the Scoutmaster Handbook, gives new and relatively inexperienced troop leaders an introduction to the Boy Scout program. However, leaders of all experience levels will find this resource helpful. The Troop Leader Guidebook, volume 1 (SKU 616729) is available at www.scoutstuff.org . The appendix in itself is a valuable collection of resources and is available to download here.
  • Roundtable Planning Guide
    The new Roundtable Planning Guide is now available to help roundtable commissioners provide leaders with program ideas and information on policy and events, as well as training opportunities.
  • Guide to Advancement—New Edition Now Available
    The 2015 edition of the Guide to Advancement is now available from www.scoutstuff.org . A PDF also is available online.
  • Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook
    This resource for Eagle Scout candidates is available online. The workbook can be downloaded for PC or Mac users—just follow the download instructions.
  • New! Interactive Digital Merit Badge Pamphlets
    The Cooking, Robotics, Animation, and First Aid merit badge pamphlets are now available in a new and exciting interactive digital format. These electronic versions of the pamphlets can be downloaded to your tablet or smartphone. Experience cutting-edge technology such as video clips, quizzes, sound bites, and other supplemental information. Additional titles will continue to be added. For a current list of interactive digital merit badge pamphlets, go to www.boyslife.org/meritbadges .

Questions related to transition timing or process may be directed to either of the following:   [email protected] [email protected]

pillar with fluerdelies
Author: 411 Task Force, Advancement Subcommittee | Boy Scouts of America

 

Original Posted Article:http://blog.utahscouts.org/varsity-scout-program-feature/preparing-for-the-new-boy-scout-rank-requirements/

2015-12-30

Josh D

Sours: http://ocscouting.com/blog/2015/12/30/preparing-for-the-new-boy-scout-rank-requirements-2016/
5 Things I Wish I Knew Before Becoming A Boy Scout...AVOID THESE MISTAKES

Thinking of joining Scouting? There have been some recent changes that you need to know about. It can be easy to confuse becoming a Boy Scout with earning the rank of Scout, but there are important distinctions that we’ll be discussing shortly.

How do you become a Boy Scout?

To officially join Scouting you must:

  1. Locate a council and troop in your area
  2. Complete a written application to the unit leader
  3. Pay a $33 membership fee

Upon completion, you will become a Boy Scout. However, to earn the rank of ‘Scout’, there are now requirements, likely taking a few weeks to fulfill, that must be understood and completed by the new member.

“Back in my day…” Trust me, it makes me feel old to say, but when I had joined Scouting there was little difference between becoming a Boy Scout and earning the rank of Scout. I’ll fill you in on the differences between then vs now, and tell you everything you need to know to both become a Boy Scout and earn the rank of Scout. Stay tuned.

Become a Boy Scout

Becoming a Boy Scout is a simple matter of locating a council and troop in your area. You’ll need to register and pay a small fee, but the process of becoming a Boy Scout is fairly simple. Having been a Boy Scout myself, I’d recommend the Scouting experience for young boys (and girls) looking to build confidence and experience the outdoors.

The path to registering for Scouting is fairly easy and can be done online. While becoming a scout is relatively inexpensive to start, this activity will get more expensive over time due to the frequent costs of equipment and camping supplies. For more information on how to join Scouting, here is a link to the official Boy Scout website.

Previously, joining Boy Scouts and becoming the Scout rank had typically been done by new scouts within the same week. However, because of changes in the last five years, the Scouting rank has become more difficult to obtain. These changes are intended to instill a greater understanding of Scouting in new initiates, right off the bat.

When Did Scout Become A Rank

As of January 1, 2016, the requirements for the Scout rank changed. Now requiring extensive knowledge of Scouting lore and practices, a requirement which ones took less than a week to fulfill, will now likely take about a month. The badge for the Scout rank was also redesigned and is now gold instead of the traditional brown color.

Additionally, to obtain the Scout rank a new Boy Scout must also participate in a Scoutmaster conference. These interviews can be nerve-racking for new scouts and were not listed as an original requirement.

Requirements for Scout Rank

Below you’ll see the current requirements for the Scout rank as well as the pre-2016 requirements. As you can tell, there is much more depth to the current requirements, which will likely delay any Boy Scout looking to earn the rank of Scout.

The Current Requirements

  1. Repeat from memory the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan. In your own words, explain their meaning.
    • Explain what Scout spirit is. Describe some ways you have shown Scout spirit by practicing the Scout Oath, Scout Law, Scout motto, and Scout slogan.
    • Demonstrate the Boy Scout sign, salute, and handshake. Explain when they should be used.
    • Describe the First Class Scout badge and tell what each part stands for. Explain the significance of the First Class Scout badge.
    • Repeat from memory the Outdoor Code. In your own words, explain what the Outdoor Code means to you.
    • Repeat from memory the Pledge of Allegiance. In your own words, explain its meaning.
  2. After attending at least one Boy Scout troop meeting, do the following:
    • Describe how the Scouts in the troop provide its leadership.
    • Describe the four steps of Boy Scout advancement.
    • Describe what the Boy Scout ranks are and how they are earned.
    • Describe what merit badges are and how they are earned.
  3. Explain the patrol method.
    • Describe the types of patrols that are used in your troop.
    • Become familiar with your patrol name, emblem, flag, and yell. Explain how these items create patrol spirit.
  4. Using a rope:
    • Show how to tie a square knot, two half-hitches, and a taut-line hitch. Explain how each knot is used.
    • Show the proper care of a rope by learning how to whip and fuse the ends of different kinds of rope.
  5. Demonstrate your knowledge of pocketknife safety.
  6. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parents Guide” and earn the Cyber Chip Award for your grade.
  7. Since joining the troop and while working on the Scout rank, participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

The Pre-2016 Requirements

  1. Meet age requirements: Be a boy who is 11 years old or one who has completed the fifth grade or earned the Arrow of Light Award and is at least 10 years old, but is not yet 18 years old.
  2. Complete a Boy Scout application and health history signed by your parent or guardian.
  3. Find a Scout troop near your home. 
  4. Repeat the Pledge of Allegiance.
  5. Demonstrate the Scout sign, salute, and handshake.
  6. Demonstrate tying the square knot (a joining knot).
  7. Understand and agree to live by the Scout Oath or Promise, Scout Law, motto, and slogan, and the Outdoor Code.
  8. Describe the Scout badge.
  9. Complete the Pamphlet Exercises. With your parent or guardian, complete the exercises in the pamphlet “How to Protect Your Children from Child Abuse: A Parent’s Guide“.
  10. Participate in a Scoutmaster conference. Turn in your Boy Scout application and health history form signed by your parent or guardian, then participate in a Scoutmaster conference.

These changes may seem abrupt, but will better prepare a new scout for a long career in Scouting. Although it’s a drastic change, no evidence suggests that these new requirements have caused a drop in new members. By better preparing new scouts to become a part of their troop, although more difficult, I think these changes will have a positive effect.

Conclusion

Joining Boy Scouts can be an immensely rewarding and central experience in one’s childhood. Although new requirements make earning the Scout rank more difficult, joining Boy Scouts remains the same simple process. For information on how to answer all of the new requirements for the Scout rank, check out my complete guide here.

Scouting is an ever-evolving organization and is always looking for better ways to allow youths to challenge themselves. These requirement changes will set new scouts in the right direction by having them start to learn more from day 1. Scouting is a family commitment, so if your child is thinking about becoming a scout, see the 5 things you should most be ready for here.

Sours: https://scoutsmarts.com/become-a-boy-scout-vs-earn-scout-rank/

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Eagle Scout (Boy Scouts of America)

Boy Scouting's highest award

Eagle Scout is the highest achievement or rank attainable in the Scouts BSA program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). Since its inception in 1911, only four percent of Scouts have earned this rank after a lengthy review process.[2] The Eagle Scout rank has been earned by over 2.5 million youth.[3]

Requirements include earning at least 21 merit badges. The Eagle Scout must demonstrate Scout Spirit, an ideal attitude based upon the Scout Oath and Law, service, and leadership. This includes an extensive service project that the Scout plans, organizes, leads, and manages. Eagle Scouts are presented with a medal and a badge that visibly recognizes the accomplishments of the Scout. Additional recognition can be earned through Eagle Palms, awarded for completing additional tenure, leadership, and merit badge requirements.

Those who have earned the rank of Eagle Scout also become eligible, although are not required, to join the National Eagle Scout Association.[4]

History[edit]

The Scouts BSA's highest award was originally conceived as the Wolf Scout, described in the June 1911 Official Handbook for Boys.[5] The August 1911 version of the handbook changed this to Eagle Scout. The medal illustrated in the handbook was a profile of an eagle in flight, but was changed to the current design before any were issued. In their original conceptions, Life Scout, Star Scout (Life preceded Star until 1924) and Eagle Scout were not ranks, but part of the merit badge system that recognized Scouts who had earned a specified number of merit badges. Eagle Scout was awarded to any First Class Scout who had earned 21 merit badges.[6]

The first Eagle Scout medal was awarded in 1912 to Arthur Rose Eldred, a 17-year-old member of Troop 1 of Rockville Centre, Long Island, New York. Records show that not only the national officers sat on Eldred's Board of Review, but also included Lord Baden-Powell who just arrived in the United States earlier in the day of January 31, 1912. Eldred was notified that he was to be awarded the rank of Eagle Scout in a letter from Chief Scout Executive James West, dated August 21, 1912. The design of the Eagle Scout medal had not been finalized by the National Council, so the medal was not awarded until Labor Day, September 2, 1912. Eldred was the first of three generations of Eagle Scouts; his son and grandson hold the rank as well.[7][8] In the 1960s, the Kansas City area awarded more Eagle Scout badges than any other council in the country, resulting in the creation of the Eagle Scout Memorial there in 1968.[9] In 1982, 13-year-old Alexander Holsinger of Normal, Illinois, was recognized as the one-millionth Eagle Scout, and Anthony Thomas of Lakeville, Minnesota, was the two-millionth in 2009.[3][10][11]

Hamilton Bradley of Rome, New York is the earliest known Black Eagle Scout in BSA history. His Eagle Scout court of honor was held at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 19, 1919, at the Rome Free Academy, according to Rome Daily Sentinel records from the time.

On October 11, 2017, Boy Scouts of America announced they would begin a program to include girls in the Boy Scout program beginning in 2019.[12][13] In February 2019, the first girls joined the renamed Scouts BSA program. In 2020, the first female Eagle Scouts were added to the Boy Scouts of America.[14][15][16][17]

Requirements[edit]

The rank of Eagle Scout may be earned by a Scout who has been a Life Scout for at least six months, has earned a minimum of 21 merit badges, has demonstrated Scout Spirit, and has demonstrated leadership within their troop, crew or ship.[18] Additionally they must plan, develop, and lead a service project—the Eagle Project—that demonstrates both leadership and a commitment to duty. After all requirements are met, they must complete an Eagle Scout board of review. The board of review can be completed up to 3 months after their 18th birthday as long as all other requirements are completed before their 18th birthday.[18]Venturers and Sea Scouts who attained First Class as a Scout may continue working toward the Star, Life and Eagle Scout ranks, as well as Eagle Palms, while registered as a Venturer or Sea Scout up to their 18th birthday. Scouts with a permanent mental or physical disability may use alternate requirements based on abilities, if approved by the council.[19]

With the introduction of Scouts BSA and the acceptance of girls, the age limit for Eagle Scout was extended. New youth members, girls or boys, 16 years of age or older, but not yet 18 who joined between February 1, 2019 and December 31, 2019 can request an extension to complete the Eagle Scout Award requirements after they turn 18 years of age.[20][21]

Eagle Scout may be awarded posthumously, if and only if all requirements except the board of review are completed before death. A board of review may be held and the award presented to the Scout's family.[22] The Spirit of the Eagle Award is an honorary posthumous special recognition for any registered youth member who has died in an accident or through illness. The Line of Duty Fallen Eagle Recognition is a recognition for Eagle Scouts who have died in the line of duty in professions such as the military, law enforcement or emergency services.[23]

Of the 21 merit badges, 13 are required:[24]

  • Camping[25][26]
  • Citizenship in the Community
  • Citizenship in the Nation
  • Citizenship in the World
  • Communications
  • Cooking[27]
  • Emergency Preparedness or Lifesaving
  • Environmental Science or Sustainability
  • Family Life
  • First Aid
  • Personal Fitness
  • Personal Management
  • Swimming or Hiking or Cycling.

Eagle Scout Service Project[edit]

Main article: Eagle Scout Service Project

The Eagle Scout Service Project, or simply "Eagle Project," is the opportunity for a Scout to demonstrate leadership of others while performing a project for the benefit of any religious institution, any school, or his community. The project is not allowed to benefit the Boy Scouts of America or its councils, districts, units, camps and so forth. It also cannot be of a commercial nature or be solely a fund-raising project.[22] There is no official requirement for duration of projects.

Development[edit]

Eagle Scout requirements have evolved since the award was conceived. A requirement to earn 11 specific merit badges was added in 1914, which underwent minor changes in 1915.[28] The Life–Star order was reversed in 1924, apparently because the five-pointed star of the Star Scout insignia could be associated with the five merit badges required to earn the rank immediately following First Class Scout. In 1927, Eagle Scout began the transition from being a super merit badge to a rank.[29] As a result, the first requirements for tenure were created and Scouts were required to be an active First Class Scout for one year. The initial requirements for what became the service project appeared with a requirement to show satisfactory service and the number of required merit badges increased to 12. In 1936, the ranks of Star and Life became mandatory, and the number of required merit badges rose to 13. It was at this time that Eagle Scout became a full-fledged rank. In 1952, age limits were set so that adults over 18 years of age could no longer earn Eagle Scout and the service project requirement was slightly expanded to "do your best to help in your home, school, church or synagogue, and community."[29] In 1958, the number of required merit badges increased again to 16 of the 21 total merit badges needed to obtain Eagle, along with the first requirements for service and leadership.[30]

In 1965, the requirements for the service project and specific troop leadership were defined, and the number of required merit badges returned to 11. The Eagle Scout candidate was required to plan, develop, and carry out a leadership service project. Minor changes were made to the required merit badge list in 1970. In 1972, the Improved Scouting Program increased to 24 the number of merit badges needed to obtain Eagle, while reducing the list of required merit badges to ten, eliminating badges that required swimming and outdoor skills—both of which were later reinstated, and adding the requirement to show leadership during the service project. In 1978, the number of merit badges needed for Eagle was lowered to the original 21, and the number of required merit badges was set at 11 (this was changed to 12 in 1993).[29] In 2014 the number of Eagle-required merit badges was increased to 13.[31]

Palms[edit]

Palms represent additional advancement for a youth who has stayed active in the unit after achieving the rank of Eagle Scout. A Palm is awarded when the Scout has demonstrated Scout Spirit, leadership and ability; has earned five additional merit badges beyond those required for Eagle or for the last Palm; and has taken part in a conference with his unit leader.

The insignia is a small metallic palm frond pin or device that is worn on the ribbon of the Eagle Scout medal, on the Eagle Scout square knot or on the Eagle Scout badge.[32]

The Palms are awarded in three colors: bronze, representing five merit badges; gold, representing ten merit badges; and silver, representing fifteen merit badges. For each Palm awarded for five additional merit badges beyond the first bronze, gold, and silver recognitions, Palms are worn in the combination that requires the smallest number of devices to reflect the total number of Palms earned. One gold Palm is equal to two bronze Palms, one silver Palm is equal to three bronze Palms, and one bronze Palm continues to be equal to five merit badges. For instance, a Scout who has earned eight Palms (forty merit badges) would wear two silver Palms and a gold Palm.[33] The order of bronze, gold and silver follows heraldic traditions of the U.S. military.[34][35][36]

Completed Palms can be awarded at the same time the Eagle Scout badge is presented. Previously, an Eagle Scout needed to wait three months between each Palm, even if the extra merit badges were earned before becoming an Eagle. This meant that, under the old rules, a youth who became an Eagle Scout at 17 years and 10 months, was unable to earn a single Eagle Palm.[37]

Insignia and apparel[edit]

An Eagle Scout presentation kit, including: Mother's oval pin, Father's oval pin, Mentor oval pin, Eagle badge, and Eagle award medal

The Eagle Scout badge is worn on the left shirt pocket by youth.[38] Adult leaders who earned the rank of Eagle Scout as a youth may wear the square knot on their uniform above the left shirt pocket.[39] The Eagle Scout medal is worn on the left shirt pocket flap of the uniform. It is usually only worn on ceremonial occasions, and can be worn by both youth and adults while wearing the badge or square knot.[40]

The Eagle Scout Award Kit currently includes the Eagle Scout medal, the Eagle Scout badge, a mother's pin, a father's pin and an Eagle Mentor pin. A variety of caps, belt buckles, pins, tie tacs, neckerchiefs and slides, bolo ties, rings, jackets, T-shirts and other items are also available for purchase.[41] Official Eagle Scout insignia is controlled by BSA Supply and requires verification by presentation of an Eagle Scout card or other means before it can be purchased.[42]

Medal[edit]

Since its introduction in 1912, the Eagle Scout medal has undergone several design changes. Changes to the scroll and to the eagle pendant were not always introduced at the same time, therefore types may be somewhat mixed. Scouting historians classify these medals by the five different manufacturers and then by 17 sub-types, with several minor variations.[43] Many variations were caused by quality control issues, mainly due to wear of the dies.

T. H. Foley made the first medals from 1912 until they went out of business in 1915.[44] The eagle pendant and scroll were of die struck bronze washed with silver. Early versions were made with a short double knot and later ones with a long double knot. Only 338 of these medals were issued, making them the rarest version. Some Foleys were issued with a drop ribbon: the ribbon was extended, folded through the bar mount on the scroll, then dropped behind the eagle pendant and cut in a swallowtail. The first drop ribbon style medal was issued to the fourth Eagle Scout, Sidney Clapp, a 31-year-old Scoutmaster from West Shokan, New York.[43]

Dieges & Clust took over production from 1916 to 1920, basing the design on the Foley.[44] These medals also have the distinguishing extra-long double knot hanging from the scroll. There were 1,640 of this variety awarded, all made of sterling silver.[45]

In 1920, the Robbins Company took over production. They produced six distinct variants, all in sterling silver. The first 1920 version was similar to the Dieges & Clust design, but with smaller scroll lettering and the standard single knot. The second 1920 version has more distinctive feathering on the back side of the pendant. The engraving on the 1930 version is especially fine.[46] In 1933, BSA was removed from all of the Eagle Scout insignia, including the medal. In 1955 the obverse of the eagle pendant was made flat so it could be engraved. BSA was added back to the front and the reverse was returned to a full feathered design in 1969.[43]

Medal manufacturer Stange was authorized to begin producing Eagle Scout medals in 1968, at the same time as Robbins – they created six distinct models. The 1968 version is very similar to the Robbins version, but the bend in the scroll is much flatter, more like a sideways V as compared to the S on the Robbins scroll. The BSA was added back to the front, and the obverse was returned to a full feathered design in 1970. A major re-design of the eagle pendant was made in 1974 to match the new NESA logo. In 1978, Robbins ceased manufacturing Eagle Scout medals and Stange switched to the last design used by Robbins. Minor differences are in the white edged ribbon and the sterling silver markings. In 1980 the price of silver rose dramatically and the medal was changed to silver-plated, die-struck copper. Very early versions were silver-plated and oxidized, thus the scroll and pendant are black. Later versions were oxidized, buffed and lacquered to maintain the silver shine. Sterling silver medals were produced from the same dies and from this time were only available on special order. The year 1993 saw a number of changes. The clasp on the scroll was changed from the pin on type to a double clutch back. The pendant was changed to pewter and enlarged due to the lighter rigidity of the material.[43]

Custom Fine Jewelry (CFJ) took over the contract in 1999 and has currently created three types. The initial versions were based on the last Stange version but with the ribbon attached through the clutch pins instead of a bar (this led to damage of the ribbon). A small number of sterling silver versions were made, marked with 925. In later 1999, the dies were laser engraved, giving a much sharper look and the ribbon mount was improved to eliminate wear. The knot went from wire to a molded version in 2001.[43]

In the fall of 2006, the national supply division of the National Eagle Scout Association (NESA) began to issue replica Eagle Scout medals for specific wear on U.S. military dress uniforms. These medals were designed to be proportionate to other military medals: they contained the same pendant, but no scroll, and a ribbon that had been made thinner and more rectangular in shape. However, in December 2007, NESA stopped selling the mini-medal after service uniforming committees all contacted the BSA and asked them to stop promoting the medal for wear on military dress uniforms. The Eagle Scout medal is not authorized for wear on any U.S. military uniform.[47]

Badge[edit]

Since its introduction, the Eagle Scout badge has undergone several design changes. Scouting historians have classified these badges into nine different designs, with several minor variations within each type.[43]

The cloth badge was introduced for Eagle Scouts attending the 2nd World Scout Jamboree in Denmark in 1924 with a design based on the hat pin. The Eagle Scout merit badge was sewn onto the top of the merit badge sash that was also created for the jamboree. The design is quite similar to the current badge. As with other patches of the time, the rank badges were embroidered onto rolls of fabric and then cut. The edges were folded under before sewing the badge onto the sash. Initially produced on tan cloth, it was later switched to olive for the Scouts BSA uniform and white and blue to match the various Sea Scout uniforms. In 1933, BSA was removed from all of the Eagle Scout insignia, including the badge.[48] The text Eagle Scout and Boy Scouts of America was added to the border, and Be Prepared was added to the scroll. These badges were embroidered with silk thread, switching to cotton in 1940.[49]

The production of badges and emblems changed in 1956 to the rolled edge now in current use, thus eliminating the various colored backgrounds. The outside oval was then changed to red. With the introduction of the Improved Scouting Program in 1972 came an overhaul of many badges and emblems. The new stylized Eagle Scout badge with no text was a major change that proved to be unpopular. It appears that some Scouters commissioned reproductions of the 1956 badge for issue in place of the 1972 version. In 1975 the badge design partially reverted to the 1956 version. 1985 saw a reversion to the 1956 issue with some minor differences. The border and the eagle were done in silver metalized thread and the Be Prepared text was in blue. In 1986 the metalized eagle changed back to standard thread due to problems with wearing and the scroll and text were enlarged. The metalized border was changed to standard thread in 1989. Later variants increased the thread count of the white stripe to eliminate the visible background.[48]

For the 2010 centennial, all of the rank badges had 2010 added to the text. To recognize the Eagle Scout centennial in 2012, a new version was released with Eagle Scout and Centennial in silver and with 1912 and 2012 in gold.[50]

Other insignia[edit]

The Distinguished Eagle Scout award

Eagle Scout hat pins were produced from 1921 through 1958 with several variations.[51] Eagle Scouts who earned additional merit badges were recognized using Eagle Palms, introduced in 1927. Adults who had earned Eagle Scout began to be recognized in 1934 with a red, white and blue ribbon bar. In 1940, a small eagle pin was added to the bar. Ribbon bars were replaced by embroidered square knot patches in 1947.[52] Over the years, the knot was produced with various background colors to match the different uniforms. Although the Venturing and Sea Scout programs use different uniform shirts, the current knot is available only with a tan background that matches the Scouts BSA uniform.[53] When the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award (DESA) was created in 1969,[54] a gold-colored eagle device was introduced for wear on the Eagle Scout square knot. The Eagle Scout Mentor pin was introduced in early 2004 in a gold-colored version. In early 2006 it was changed to a silver-colored antique finish to match the mother and father pins but in 2007 was changed back to gold-colored. In 2008, the National Eagle Scout Association (NESA) introduced a knot recognizing those Eagle Scouts who are life members of NESA; it uses the standard knot emblem with a silver border.[52]

Certificates[edit]

From 1912 to 1943 the BSA issued an index-sized card with information about the Eagle Scout. Wallet-size cards were introduced in 1944 and switched to a plastic credit card style in 1991. Certificates suitable for framing were first issued in 1944. As the honorary president of the BSA, the signature of the President of the United States appears on all certificates. Replacement of a card or certificate can be made by application through the National Eagle Scout Association (NESA).[55]

After achieving the rank of Eagle Scout[edit]

Eagle Scouts are expected to set an example for other Scouts and to become the leaders in life that they have demonstrated themselves to be in Scouting. They are disproportionately represented in the military, service academy graduates, in higher education and academia, major professions, the clergy, business and politics.[56][57]: 149–159  Eagles are more likely to exercise for 30 minutes or more every day, volunteer for religious and nonreligious organizations, have closer relationships with family and friends, be in a leadership position at their place of employment or local community, donate money to charitable groups, and to work with others to improve their neighborhoods.[58]

Scholarship opportunities[edit]

Academic scholarships can be awarded to Eagle Scouts based upon academic, financial need and Scouting participation. The application requirement for the Scout is to have a minimum score of 1290 on the SAT Reasoning Test or 28 on the ACT. Scholarships vary in the amount awarded.[59] The Scout may be awarded:

  • the $3,000 NESA scholarships
  • the $2,500 Mabel and Lawrence S. Cooke scholarship
  • a $25,000 Mabel and Lawrence S. Cooke scholarship
  • a $48,000 Mabel and Lawrence S. Cooke scholarship
  • the $50,000 NESA STEM scholarship
  • others that vary in amount

Adult Eagle Scouts[edit]

Eagle Scout Award patch for Adult Scouters

Main article: List of Eagle Scouts

The list of Eagle Scouts is extensive. In addition, the accomplishment is considered to be notable as Adult Scouters who earned Eagle Scout as a youth are entitled to wear a square knot emblem with a red, white, and blue striped square knot above the left shirt pocket.[39] Eagle Scouts may join the National Eagle Scout Association (NESA), which serves as a fraternal and communications board for all Eagle Scouts. The NESA Outstanding Eagle Scout Award recognizes Eagle Scouts who have demonstrated outstanding achievement at the local, state, or regional level. The Distinguished Eagle Scout Award is given only to Eagle Scouts for distinguished service in their profession and the community for a period of at least 25 years after earning Eagle Scout.[60]

Eagle Scouts who enlist in the U.S. Armed Forces may receive advanced enlisted rank in recognition of their achievements.[61][62][63] For commissioned officer programs, attainment of Eagle Scout is considered a positive factor in determining service academy appointments and award of college ROTC scholarships.[64][65][66]

NESA directly administers several Eagle Scout scholarships.[67] The American Legion,[68] the National Jewish Committee on Scouting,[69] and the Sons of the American Revolution[70] offer scholarships directed toward Eagle Scouts. Many colleges and universities, local businesses, churches and other organizations offer similar scholarships.[71]

Controversies[edit]

Further information: Boy Scouts of America membership controversies

After the BSA v.Dale decision in 2000 affirmed the BSA's right to exclude homosexuals, a small number of Eagle Scouts returned their badges to the National Council in protest of the BSA's policies. The advocacy group Scouting for All claimed to have received as many as one thousand letters from Eagle Scouts who had done so;[72] the BSA later stated that fewer than one hundred Eagle Scout badges had been received.[73]

In 2012, the BSA reaffirmed its policies on the exclusion of homosexuals; again a number of Eagle Scouts returned their badges in protest.[74] In May 2013, the National Council of the Boy Scouts of America voted to lift the ban on openly gay youth beginning on January 1, 2014,[75][76] with the ban on openly gay adult leaders remaining in effect. On June 27, 2015, the ban on gay leaders was also lifted.[77] In response, two Eagle Scouts returned their badges in protest of the change to the BSA's policy accepting gay Scouts.[78][79]

Recipients[edit]

Main article: List of Eagle Scouts

Four Nobel Prize laureates are known to be Eagle Scouts: Dudley R. Herschbach, Peter Agre, Robert Coleman Richardson, and Frederick Reines.[80] Twelve Eagle Scouts have been awarded the Medal of Honor: Eugene B. Fluckey,[81]Aquilla J. Dyess,[57]Robert Edward Femoyer,[82]Walter Joseph Marm, Jr.,[83]Mitchell Paige,[57]: 18–19 Thomas R. Norris,[84]Arlo L. Olson,[85]Ben L. Salomon,[86]Leo K. Thorsness,[87]Jay Zeamer Jr.,[88]Britt K. Slabinski, and Ralph Puckett

At least forty astronauts earned the rank as a youth, including Neil Armstrong and Charles Duke, both of whom walked on the Moon.[89] Businessmen who have earned the award include Wal-Mart founder Sam Walton,[57]: 88–89 Marriott InternationalCEOJ. W. Marriott, Jr.,[54] and Michael Bloomberg, Mayor of New York City and founder of Bloomberg L.P.

Famous Eagle Scouts

    Eagle Scouts who have held public office include 38thPresident of the United StatesGerald R. Ford,[91] 22nd U.S. Secretary of DefenseRobert Gates,[54][57]: 217–218  13th and 21st U.S. Secretary of DefenseDonald Rumsfeld,[92] 69th U.S. Secretary of StateRex Tillerson, Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme CourtStephen Breyer[57]: 56–59 [93] and 84th U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

    In academia, Eagle Scouts are represented by Pulitzer Prize for General Nonfiction-winner E.O. Wilson, E. Gordon Gee, former President of Ohio State University, and Kim B. Clark, former Dean of the Harvard Business School, and former president of Brigham Young University–Idaho.[54][94] Entertainers who earned the BSA's highest rank include documentary filmmaker and Academy Award-winner Michael Moore,[95]Academy Award-winning director Steven Spielberg,[96] and Mike Rowe, host of Dirty Jobs.[97]

    Athletes who have earned Eagle Scout include Basketball Hall of Famer (later U.S. Senator) Bill Bradley, NBA All-Star Mark Eaton, MLB All-Star Shane Victorino, NASCAR Cup Series Winner William Byron and pitcher Jon Moscot, and Notre Dame and San Diego Chargers linebacker Manti Te'o.[98][99] Religious leaders who have earned Eagle Scout include CardinalArchbishop Emeritus of BaltimoreWilliam H. Keeler, and Howard W. Hunter, 14th president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.[100]

    Other notable recipients include Sam Berns, an American teen who had progeria and helped raise awareness about the disease, the novelist and adventurer Clive Cussler,[101] and Ross Ulbricht, the creator of the darknet Silk Road.

    Impact[edit]

    The National Eagle Scout Association researched the total volunteer hours of the Eagle service projects ever done and it came a total of more than 100 million hours of service. Each year, new Eagle Scouts add more than three million more hours.[102] Eagle Scouts completed about 9.5 million hours in 2011.[103]

    January 31 is officially recognized by NESA as National Eagle Scout Day in recognition of Eldred's Board of Review he sat in 1912. The important date of an Eagle Scouts Board of Review is the officially recognized date a Scout achieves the rank of Eagle Scout regardless of the date of their Eagle Court of Honor.[102]

    Further reading[edit]

    References[edit]

    1. ^Wendell, Bryan (February 21, 2018). "Eagle Scout Class of 2018: A Comprehensive Look at the Numbers Behind the Number". Bryan on Scouting. Scouting.
    2. ^Malone, Michael S. (2012). Four percent : the story of uncommon youth in a century of American life. ISBN .
    3. ^ ab"Eagle Scout Class of 2016, by the numbers". Scouting. February 8, 2017. Retrieved March 16, 2019.
    4. ^"Join/Renew". The National Eagle Scout Association. Retrieved January 23, 2020.
    5. ^"Editions: Boy Scout Handbook by Boy Scouts of America". LibraryThing. Retrieved August 14, 2015.
    6. ^BSA Editorial Board (1911). The Official Handbook for Boys. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, Page and Company.
    7. ^"The first Eagle Scout". Filpac. Retrieved August 14, 2015.
    8. ^Ray, Mark (Winter 2005). "Eagle Scout Heritage Celebration Brings History to Life". Eagletter. 31 (3): 8–9.
    9. ^"Eagle Scout Memorial Fountain". KC Fountains. Retrieved January 10, 2014.
    10. ^Reagan, Ronald (September 14, 1982). "Remarks by Telephone to Eagle Scout Award Recipient Alexander M. Holsinger". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved October 17, 2006.
    11. ^Spiros, Dean (June 17, 2009). "Lakeville teen is Eagle Scout No. 2 million". Star-Tribune. Archived from the original on May 18, 2013. Retrieved May 16, 2015.
    12. ^"The BSA Expands Programs to Welcome Girls from Cub Scouts to Highest Rank of Eagle Scout" (Press release). Boy Scouts of America. October 11, 2017. Archived from the original on October 11, 2017. Retrieved October 11, 2017.
    13. ^Williams, Pete (October 11, 2017). "Boy Scouts Will Admit Girls, Allow Them to Earn Eagle Scout Rank". NBC News.
    14. ^Lick, Val (September 17, 2020). "'Unprecedented' | Minnesota girl to become one of first female Eagle Scouts, earns all merit badges". KARE. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
    15. ^Cardwell, Alexandra (October 12, 2020). "First female Eagle Scout, Tunney offers inspiration for all". The Rubicon. Saint Paul, Minnesota: St. Paul Academy and Summit School. Retrieved September 13, 2021.
    16. ^Cho, Aimee (October 16, 2020). "Virginia Girl to Make History as One of First Female Eagle Scouts". NBC Washington. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
    17. ^"Teen makes history as one of the first female Eagle Scouts in the nation". ABC 13. December 14, 2020. Retrieved December 14, 2020.
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    43. ^ abcdefGrove, Terry (2004). A Comprehensive Guide to the Eagle Scout Award (Twentieth Century ed.). pp. 10–170. ISBN .
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    48. ^ abMurray, Craig. "The Eagle Badge". Boy Scout Badge History. Retrieved June 19, 2006.
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    51. ^Murray, Craig. "Eagle Scout Miniature Badge Pin". Boy Scout Badge History. Retrieved May 24, 2006.
    52. ^ abCrowl, George. "Illustrated History of BSA Square Knot Evolution"(PDF). Retrieved March 24, 2006.
    53. ^Murray, Craig. "Eagle Square Knot". Boy Scout Badge History. Retrieved May 24, 2006.
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    57. ^ abcdefTownley, Alvin (2007). Legacy of Honor: The Values and Influence of America's Eagle Scouts. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN .
    58. ^Jang, Sung Joon; Johnson, Byron R.; Kim, Young-II (April 10, 2012). Eagle Scouts: Merit Beyond the Badge(PDF) (Report). Institute for Studies of Religion, Baylor University. Retrieved March 5, 2015.
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    72. ^Florio, Gwen (2000). "Gay Boy Scouts Returning Prized Eagle Badges in Protest". Philadelphia Inquirer. Archived from the original on February 14, 2007. Retrieved February 11, 2007.
    73. ^"In Support of Values". Scouting (March–April 2001). Retrieved August 7, 2007.
    74. ^Traywick, Catherine (July 25, 2012). "Eagle Scouts Return Badges in Protest of Gay Ban". Time.
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    External links[edit]

    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eagle_Scout_(Boy_Scouts_of_America)


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