Horseback riding near prescott az

Horseback riding near prescott az DEFAULT

Best Horseback Riding Trails in Prescott

Explore the most popular horseback riding trails near Prescott with hand-curated trail maps and driving directions as well as detailed reviews and photos from hikers, campers and nature lovers like you.
Map of horseback riding trails in Prescott, Arizona
Prescott Circle Trail
Prescott Circle Trail
Prescott Circle Trail
#8 - Prescott Circle Trail
Watson Lake Park
Length: 87.9 km • Est. Multi-day
This 54-mile non-motorized trail gives hikers, backpackers, horse riders, and mountain bikers a route through Prescott National Forest, City of Prescott, Yavapai County, and state lands. You will get views of Watson Lake, Willow Lake, and Goldwater Lake, cut through Granite Dells, and take in Granite Mountain and Thumb Butte. For a list of downloadable segments, click here: https://www.alltrails.com/explore/list/prescott-circle-trail-segmentsShow more
Showing results 1 - 10 of 20
Sours: https://www.alltrails.com/us/arizona/prescott/horseback-riding

Prescott Horseback Riding Trips

Whether you’re a local, seasonal local or just visiting for a few days, a Prescott horseback riding trip should definitely be on your “To-do” list if you haven’t already experienced this unique way of exploring Prescott’s beautiful countryside. Prescott, AZ is proud of its authentic cowboy culture and most everyone interested in spending time in Prescott would certainly get enjoyment from this type of experience. From casual scenic strolls to steep, rocky hills, through the flowing water of the Verde River – there’s a ride for you. Some stables are very comfortable with beginner riders ranging in age from children to seniors, while others offer horseback riding trips for advanced, experienced riders.

Here are 5 Tips for Your Guided Horseback Riding Trip:

  1. You’re in the country now - so don’t expect everything to run on a perfect time schedule or exactly as described on the tour’s website. Weather, trail conditions, complications from a trip before yours, etc. are all pretty typical variables that make slight changes on a pretty regular basis. Be patient with your horseback riding trip guides. If you happen to have to wait while trip guides scurry to get ready for your ride, take a minute to enjoy the contrast of everyday life versus the adventure you’re about to experience. Slow down. That’s part of what all this is about.
  2. If you can, go for an earlier ride. Your guides are awesome, informative, entertaining and love what they do. But as with everyone, people (and horses) can get tired towards the end of the day. Plus, other guests on the trips before yours could delay or require a lot of attention from the guides before your ride. The earlier you go on your ride, the smoother your overall trip tends to be. This is not a fact, just an overall anecdotal conclusion based on stories and reviews.
  3. Drink a lot of water (bring some, too!) and go to the restroom before your trail ride. Especially if you’re not comfortable with squatting! There typically are no outhouses or port-o-potties on the trail. If you’re not comfortable going out in nature, make sure to take care of your business beforehand.
  4. The length of your trip that you reserve usually includes time for signing waivers and introduction stuff. If you sign up for 3 hour trip, expect to ride closer to 2 hours. There’s a few things your guides need to go over in order to keep you safe, while also getting to know you, your riding abilities and expectations for the trip. They shouldn’t have to do this on their time, so it’s on yours. We seem to think that’s pretty fair to everyone.
  5. Don’t forget to tip your guide! If you've enjoyed your guided horseback riding trip, please tip your guide well. The trip guides certainly do this for the love of sharing the experience with others and not to get rich. A monetary thank you for their time, experience, hard work and information is very much appreciated.

Have fun! Cowboys are pretty much the All-American icon. Even more so than baseball players and superheroes. It’s one the most American things you can do, and so few people in this country actually get to experience it! So enjoy this authentic piece of our heritage and cross one more thing off your Bucket List.


RECOMMENDED WESTERN EXPERIENCES

Blazin' M Ranch

Blazin' M Ranch

Blazin' M Ranch features a BBQ chicken and ribs chuckwagon supper and a toe-tappin Western stage production by award-winning musicians. Guests may arrive before dinner to enjoy Old-Tyme photography, a museum, shooting gallery, tractor pull, ropin' lessons, Western shops or the Copper Spur … More

Blazin' M Ranch features a BBQ chicken and ribs chuckwagon supper and a toe-tappin Western stage production by award-winning musicians. Guests may arrive before dinner to enjoy Old-Tyme photography, a museum, shooting gallery, tractor pull, ropin' lessons, Western shops or the Copper Spur Saloon.


Sours: https://www.prescott.com/horseback-riding
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Prescott Horseback Riding, Horse Trail Rides

Where can I go Prescott horseback riding?

  • Aspen Creek Trail: This trail runs along the Hassayampa Golf Club, up off of Thumb Butte Road. 
  • Butte Creek Trail: This trail begins at Stricklin Forest Park on Sherwood Drive and runs for a little over a mile through Prescott and then out into the Prescott National Forest. 
  • Lower Granite Creek Discovery Trail: The trail follows the western shore of Watson Lake and joins up with the Peavine Trail. 
  • Prescott Peavine National Recreation Trail: The Peavine Trail is a five mile trail, much of which was originally the Santa Fe Railway. The Peavine Trail connects to the Iron King Trail, for those who wish to continue their ride. 
  • Watson Lake: Take a ride around Watson Lake. This trail is only one mile long, however it can be extended by connecting to the Prescott Peavine Trail. 
  • Willow Lake: The Willow Lake Trail is open to all sorts of visitors, from those on horseback to those on foot to those with pets. The 3.5 mile trail is at the high-water mark of the lake.

I am looking for a guide.

Look into the guided activities and companies listed below that might be able to assist you in your upcoming horseback riding expedition.

Sours: https://www.allprescott.com/summer_recreation/horseback_riding.php
Prescott Saddle Club Foothills Ride on Horseback

Horse Riding


Horse Riding Areas

  • Bradshaw Ranger District area description

    NOTE: Opening of the developed recreation sites in Horsethief Basin has been delayed by the Tussock Fire. Opening date will be announced/posted as soon as possible.

    The Bradshaw Mountains, located south of Prescott, have long been known for being one of the most mineralized mountain ranges in the world. As early as the mid-1800's, mining first brought settlers to this part of Arizona. The Bradshaw Ranger District encompasses the Bradshaw Range and extends beyond it, surrounding the city of Prescott.
    The Bradshaws offer cool relief from the desert below, with numerous developed and dispersed recreation opportunities available. Mount Union, in the Bradshaws, is the highest elevation on the forest, at nearly 8,000 feet. From 7,000 to 8,000 foot elevation along the Bradshaw Range, the vegetation changes from pure forests of ponderosa pine to mixed conifer forests of Douglas-fir and white fir. The weather throughout the Bradshaw District is moderate, with daytime temperatures averaging 50 degrees in the winter and 70 degrees in summer. Recreation opportunities abound throughout all seasons.


    Granite Mountain Wilderness, the forest's only "urban" wilderness, is located just a few short miles from Prescott. Other scenic attractions include Thumb Butte, Lynx Lake and the Thumb Butte Loop, as well as drives to Palace Station and Crown King. For more information, please contact the Bradshaw Ranger District.

    Map sales, free motor vehicle use maps, recreation opportunity guides, wood cutting permits, and information.

  • Castle Creek Wilderness area description

    This wilderness of 25,517 acres sits on the eastern slopes of the Bradshaw Mountains and is characterized by extremely rugged topography with prominent granite peaks that overlook the Agua Fria River.

    Elevations range from 2,800 and 7,000 feet. The primary vegetation at the lower elevations is saguaro cactus, palo verde, and mesquite. As the elevation increases, grassland species change into the chaparral community and the highest elevations have ponderosa pine, Arizona whiteoak, and alligator juniper.

    Castle Creek Wilderness on Wilderness.net

    The USFS Wilderness Stewardship brochure explains more about designated Wilderness and how you can become involved in helping care for this precious resource.     

  • Algonquin Trail #225
  • Castle Creek Trail #239
  • East Fort Trail #31
  • Horsethief Canyon Trail #30
  • Horsethief Recreation Trail #201
  • Jim Creek Trail #235
  • Twin Peaks Trail #240
  • Willow Creek Trail #236
  • Arrastra Creek Trail #275
  • Battle Flat Trail #389
  • Blind Indian Connection Trail #9211
  • Bradshaw Trail #216
  • Bullroad Trail #202
  • Collins Trail #282
  • Elouise Trail #306
  • Horse Mountain Trail #212
  • Horsethief Lookout Trail #203
  • Kentuck Trail #217
  • Lane Mountain Trail #233
  • Minni Trail #9238
  • Old Bodie Mine Road Trail #319
  • Pine Creek Trail #289
  • Pine Flat Connector Trail #9275
  • Tip Top Trail #234
  • Towers Mountain Trail #131
  • Tuscumbia Trail #215
  • Wagoner Trail #213
  • Granite Basin Recreation Area area description

    Nestled among pines and boulders of Prescott's iconic Granite Mountain, Granite Basin Recreation Area offers a variety of recreational opportunities year-round including: hiking, backpacking, horse riding, non-motorized boating, rock climbing, fishing, camping, and picnicking. Scroll down (below the recreation map) to learn more about the excellent recreational opportunities in Granite Basin. 

     

    Granite Basin Recreation Area Brochure  (1.54 MB)

     

    Note: Some sites in this recreation area may close to prevent resource damage following especially heavy snow and when the roads are too icy.  If you plan to visit and want to make sure it is open, please contact the Bradshaw Ranger Station: 928-443-8000.

     

    Notice: Visitors are asked to be alert and stay on existing trails when recreating on Granite Mountain as the area recovers from the Doce Fire of 2013. Soil erosion has occurred on portions of the trails, thus exposing more rock, and cross-country travel increases the possibility of encountering rolling rocks, stump and root holes, falling trees, and loose soils from rains.  

  • Balancing Rock Trail #349
  • Cayuse Equestrian Trailhead
  • Cayuse Loop
  • Clark Spring Trail #40
  • Hokaygon Trail #341
  • Mint Wash Connector Trail #352
  • West Lake Trail #351
  • Baby Granite Loop
  • Granite Mountain Trail #261
  • Tin Trough Springs Trail #308
  • Almosta Trail #622
  • Jim Higgs Trail #1937
  • Mint Wash Trail #345
  • North Granite Trail #671
  • Williamson Valley Trailhead
  • Willow Trail #347
  • Blind Indian Trail #211
  • Dandrea Trail #285
  • Dolphin Trail #85
  • E Cross L Trail #281
  • Golden Eagle Trail #280
  • Goldwater Lakes Trail #396
  • Crown King Area (Horsethief Basin) area description

    Horsethief Basin Recreation Area offers a variety of recreational opportunities including: hiking, mountain biking, horseback riding, camping, fishing, and OHV riding. Castle Creek Wilderness is located nearby, and Horsethief Cabin and Turney Gulch Group Campground are available by reservation. Day use sites and trails are open year-round; overnight accommodations are not available during the winter. Scroll down (below the recreation map) to learn more about these recreational opportunities.

    Prescott National Forest Seeks Partners to Manage Horsethief Basin Recreation Sites

    Please visit our Request for Expressions of Interest webpage to learn more about this unique opportunity to give us input and/or to propose your management strategy for the recreation sites in Horsethief Basin.

    Note: Until further notice, use of high-clearance vehicle is recommended for those who plan to visit recreation sites in Horsethief Basin.

    Fish Consumption Advisory: The Arizona Department of Environmental Quality (ADEQ), in association with the Arizona Game and Fish Department (AGFD), issued a fish consumption advisory for largemouth bass caught from Horsethief Basin Lake in Yavapai County and south of the community of Crown King. This advisory is based on recent analysis of fish tissue data that indicate elevated levels of mercury.

  • Granite Mountain via Williamson Valley Road area description

    Trails starting on the east side of Granite Mountain may be reached via Williamson Valley Road:

     

    • Almosta Trail #622
    • Mint Wash Trail #345
    • Willow Trail #347 

    Granite Basin Recreation Area Brochure  (1.54 MB)

  • Groom Creek Area area description

    Located in the cool pines of central Arizona, Groom Creek offers a variety of recreational opportunities including: camping, picnicking, hiking, mountain biking, bouldering, and horseback riding.  Groom Creek area day use sites and trails are open year-round; campgrounds are open from May 1 to October 31 and closed during the winter.  Scroll down (below the recreation map) to learn more about these recreational opportunities.

  • Groom Creek Equestrian Trail #307 Trailhead
  • Groom Creek Horse Camp
  • Groom Creek Loop Trail #307
  • Horsecamp Loop Trail #383
  • Isabella Trail #377
  • Kendall Camp Trail #65
  • Ponderosa Trail #382
  • Venezia Trail #381
  • Watershed Trail #299
  • Wolf Creek Loop Trail #384
  • Iron Springs area description

    Recreational opportunities that can be reached via Iron Springs Road include: OHV riding, OHV camping, horse riding, mountain biking, and hiking.  Granite Basin Recreation Area, which offers camping and picnicking opportunities, is also reached via Iron Springs Road.

  • Aspen Creek Trail #48
  • Little Granite Mountain Trail #37
  • Little Granite Trailhead / Day Use Area
  • Iron Springs/Jerome Canyon area description

    Recreation opportunities include hiking, horse riding, OHV riding, and mountain biking.  Trail markers will be added to the map as time allows, and more detailed information will be added to each trail's web page.  Trails in the area include:

     

     

    • Box Culvert Trail #620
    • Cedar Springs Trail #41
    • Circle Trail #322
    • Cold Springs Trail #393
    • Granite Tank Trail #9406
    • High Valley Ranch Trail #391
    • North Granite Trail #671
    • Porter Spur Trail #300
    • Sierra Prieta Trail #366
    • Toohey Trick Tank Trail #9440
    • Upper Pasture Trail #38
    • West Spruce Trail #264
    • White Rock Spring Trail #39
    • Wood Trap Trail

    Trailhead markers will be added to the map as time allows.  Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this website.

  • Box Culvert Trail #620
  • Cedar Springs Trail #41
  • Cold Springs Trail #393
  • Granite Tank Trail #9406
  • High Valley Ranch Trail #391
  • Javelina Trail #332
  • Porter Spur Trail #300
  • Sierra Prietta Trail #366
  • Toohey Trick Tank Trail #9440
  • Upper Pasture Trail #38
  • West Spruce Trail #264
  • White Rock Spring Trail #39
  • Boy Scout Trail #126
  • Ranch Trail #62
  • Salida Connection Trail #9263
  • Salida Gulch Trail #95
  • Seven Mile Gulch Trail #9854
  • Smith Ravine Trail #297
  • Poland Junction area description

    Recreational opportunities include hiking, motorcycle riding, horse riding, and OHV riding.  There are no developed recreation sites in this part of the forest.  Trail information will be added as time allows.  Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this site.

  • Buckhorn Trail #130
  • Cat Walk Trail #9438
  • Chalk Springs Trail #89
  • Charcoal Gulch Trail #9419
  • Crystal Springs Trail #9435
  • Daniels Ridge Trail #9219
  • Little Wolf Creek Trail #304
  • Little Wolf Trail #9434
  • Nemo Spring Trail #9405
  • Prescott Circle Trail
  • Prescott Valley, South area description

    Hiking, mountain biking, horse riding, and motorized trails.  There are no developed recreation sites in this part of the forest.  Trail information will be added as time allows.  Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this site.

  • Prospectors Trail #42
  • White Horse Tank Trail #354
  • Prescott to Wickenberg via White Spar Road area description

    Heading south out of Prescott, White Spar Road (Hwy 89) is a winding, scenic drive ending in Wickenberg.  Various recreational opportunities can be reached via White Spar Road including: hiking, mountain biking, horse riding, and camping.  Remants of the Indian Fire, which burned south of Prescott in 2002, are evident just south of Prescott.

  • Banning Creek Trail #81
  • Schoolhouse Gulch Trail #67
  • Thumb Butte area description
  • Butte Connection Trail #323
  • Butte Creek Trail #321
  • Circle Connection Trail #322
  • Garden Grove Trail #392
  • Miller Creek Trail #367
  • North Thumb Butte Trails #315, #316, #317 & #318
  • Rancho Vista Trail #387
  • Thumb Butte Bypass Trail #326
  • Wilhoit area description

    Trails: hiking, horse riding, OHV riding, and mountain biking.  There are no developed recreation sites in this part of the forest. 

    Trail markers will be added to the map as time allows.  For now, please use the left-hand navigation bar to find more information about the trails in the Wilhoit area:

    • East Copper #260
    • Glen Oaks #118
    • Orofino #107

     Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this site.

  • Buzzard Trail #129
  • Cherry Creek Trail #214
  • Climax Trail #274
  • East Copper Trail #260
  • Glen Oaks Trail #118
  • Orofino Trail #107
  • Wolverton Mountain Trail #9415
  • Chino Valley Ranger District area description

    Nestled comfortably in the mountains of Central Arizona at an elevation ranging 3,000 to 8,000 feet, Chino Valley is located about 20 miles north of Prescott and 2 hours northwest of Phoenix. In 1863, Arizona's first Territorial Capital was established nearby at Del Rio Springs, and the surrounding area has experienced explosive growth since the town of Chino Valley was incorporated in 1970.


    Watershed, wildlife and range management, dispersed recreation, and fuel wooding are programs emphasized by the District. Chino Valley is also very involved in managing the Upper Verde River Area, habitat of some sensitive and endangered species. Ashes, willows, and cottonwood trees are common vegetation types found along the river banks.
    Although the Chino Valley Ranger District does not have developed recreation sites, there are many recreation opportunities on the District. One of the most popular recreation areas on the west side of the District is Camp Wood, located in the pines at an elevation of 5,700 feet. Approximately one mile north of Camp Wood is a riparian area, Emerald Glade, which is host to a variety of wildlife. This area was created by a masonry silt retention structure as part of our forest's wildlife habitat improvement program. The popular camping areas on the east side of the District are along the headwaters of the Verde River. The most popular trail is Sycamore Trail, located in the Sycamore Canyon Wilderness.


    In addition to Sycamore Canyon, three other wilderness areas are located within the district: Juniper Mesa Wilderness and Apache Creek Wilderness on the west side, Woodchute Wilderness on the east side. For more information, please contact the Chino Valley Ranger District.

    Map sales, free Motor Vehicle Use maps, permits, and information.

  • Apache Creek Wilderness area description

    Rolling hills of juniper and pinyon interspersed with granite outcrops characterize this small, remote and relatively rugged wilderness. Established in 1984, the 5,628 acre wilderness features three natural springs and several important riparian areas including Apache Creek. Elevations range from 5,200 to 6,900 feet and the area provides excellent habitat for mountain lion and numerous bird species.

    There are 2 maintained trails within this wilderness:

     

    Apache Creek Wilderness on Wildreness.net

    Printable Trail Description and Map (595 KB PDF; 8.5” X 11”)

    The USFS Wilderness Stewardship brochure explains more about designated Wilderness and how you can become involved in helping care for this precious resource. 

  • Apache Creek Loop
  • Camp Wood Area area description

    High in the cool pines northwest of Chino Valley, the Camp Wood area has no developed recreational facilities, but has a variety of trail-use and dispersed camping opportunities.  Trails in the area include:

      

  • 7 Up To Hyde Mountain Trail #5
  • Adra Loop Trail #9044
  • Bt Butte Trail #133
  • Cold Water Trail #21
  • Connel Mountain Trail #9921
  • Cottonwood Mountain Trail #8
  • Cutoff Trail #22
  • Dead Steer Basin Trail #9908
  • Grapevine Springs Trail #9825
  • Hyde Mountain Trail #6
  • Merritt Spring Trail #9
  • Prospect Point Trail #9097
  • Shivers Trail #9879
  • Shivers Trap Trail #10
  • Stinson Tank Trail #9836
  • Stringtown Trail #9917
  • Bug Hollow Trail #548
  • Mescal Trail #547
  • Powerline Trail #549
  • Upper Mescal Trail #550
  • Juniper Mesa Wilderness area description

    Established in 1984, the 7,554 acre wilderness is characterized by the flat topped mesa from which its name is derived. Elevations range from 5,600 feet on the southwest side near Juniper Spring to 7,000 feet on the west side near George Wood Canyon and Gobblers Knob. The primary vegetation on the steep southern slopes in pinon pine and Utah juniper, and on the northern slopes, ponderosa pine and alligator juniper.

    A great variety of wildlife can be found in the area. Black bear, elk, mule deer, bobcat, and Abert's squirrel are relatively common. There are no perennial water sources present, and the reliability of springs may be questioned during long periods of dry weather.

    The USFS Wilderness Stewardship brochure explains more about designated Wilderness and how you can become involved in helping care for this precious resource. 

  • Juniper Mesa Trail #20
  • Juniper Mountains area description

    Recreational Opportunities include: hiking, mountain biking, dispersed camping, horse riding, and OHV trail riding.  Please note: mechanized travel  is prohibited within the boundaries of the Juniper Mesa Wilderness Area.

  • Bull Springs Trail #100
  • Juniper Springs Trail #2
  • Oaks And Willows Trail #3
  • Old Military Trail #1
  • Spur Gulch Trail #9942
  • Burro Trail #9041
  • Duff Springs Trail #9016
  • Powerline Two Trail #990
  • Perkinsville - Hickey Mountain area description

    Area northeast of Chino Valley, and southwest of Sycamore Canyon.  Trail information will be added as time allows.  Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this web site.  

  • Atchison-river Trail #9011
  • Black Mesa Trail #9036
  • Coyote Trail #101
  • Government Canyon Trail #73
  • Hell Point Trail #9012
  • Martin Canyon Trail #103
  • Mc Canyon Point Trail #9013
  • River Trail #517
  • Secret Trail #58
  • Sycamore Trail #9033
  • Trestle River Trail #9007
  • Seepage Mountain area description

    There are no developed recreation sites in this part of the forest.

  • Brushy Tank Trail #9913
  • Cabin Springs Trail #9874
  • Cement Troughs Trail #918
  • Coop Tank Trail #667
  • Section 23 Tank Trail #9878
  • Short Cut Trail #9915
  • Sheridan Mountain/Smith Mesa area description

    Popular OHV areas with numerous trails designed with off-road enthusiasts in mind.  There are no developed recreation sites in this part of the forest.  

    The webpage for Sheridan Mountain #11  has a more detailed description.

     

    Other trails in the area include:

    Currently the webpages for these trails say little more than where the trail is located.

  • Alligator Spring Trail #9926
  • Anderson Trail #55
  • Bullwater Trail #24
  • Burke Spring Trail #35
  • Cedar Mesa Trail #13
  • Cottonwood Spring Trail #664
  • Elbow Springs Trail #9941
  • Queens Tank Trail #9898
  • Sheridan Mountain Trail #11
  • Smith Mesa Corral Trail #665
  • South Benches Trail #56
  • Tailhoit Mesa Trail #666
  • Verde Ranger District area description

    Located near the geographic center of Arizona, the Verde Ranger District is accessible to visitors from all over the state. Drop a fishing line into the Verde River at one of eight day-use access points or put your canoe in at White Bridge Recreation Area for a popular nine-mile float to Beasley Flat. Explore the site of an old salt mine near Camp Verde, re-create history by following part of General Crook’s military supply route, or book a stay at Sycamore Cabin, which once served as the ranger station for the old Bloody Basin Ranger District. ATV enthusiasts can enjoy off-road riding at Hayfield Draw.


    For relief from summer’s heat, follow the winding highway up to Mingus Mountain and camp in the pines at Potato Patch Campground or Mingus Recreation Area; groups of 20 to 100 can reserve Playground Group Campground. Many of the District’s hiking trails are located on Mingus, but it’s also a great place to relax and enjoy panoramic views of the Verde Valley. A bit lower on the mountain, near the cluster of homes known as Cherry, Powell Springs Campground stays open all year.


    To escape from the crowds, try a backpacking trip into Pine Mountain or Cedar Bench wildernesses, on the southeastern edge of the District. Bring your own water and be prepared for an abundance of wildlife such as bears, mountain lions, and javelina. For more information, please contact the Verde Ranger District.
     

    Information, permits, interpretive displays, LEED green building with solar panels and monitor, map sales, and free motor vehicle use maps for Prescott, Coconino, and Kaibab National Forests.

  • Arnold Mesa Trails area description

     

    (Squaw Peak/Reimer Road; Verde Ranger District)  Recreation opportunities include hiking, horse riding, OHV riding, and mountain biking.  Trail markers will be added to the map as time allows, and more detailed information will be added to each trail's web page.  For now, the links below provide limited information about the trails in the Arnold Mesa area:

     

  • Box T Trail #511
  • Cottonwood Trail #9709
  • Squaw Peak Trail #518
  • Tomkins Trail #513
  • Camp Verde Area Trails area description

    Trails in the area offer opportunities for hiking, mountain biking, horse riding, and OHV riding.  For picnicking, fishing, tubing, boating, and camping opportunities in the area please refer to the Verde River sites list.

    Trails and trailheads near Camp Verde:

    Hayfield Draw OHV Area has an open area for riding (50" and less) and access to OHV trails in the area.

  • Black Canyon Trail #114
  • Camp Verde Trail #545
  • Copper Canyon Trailhead
  • Grief Hill Day Use Area / Trailhead
  • Grief Hill Trail #153
  • River Trail #517
  • Ryal Canyon Trail #521
  • Sand Wash Trail #527
  • Cedar Bench Wilderness area description

    Trails in the Cedar Bench Wilderness include:

    The USFS Wilderness Stewardship brochure explains more about designated Wilderness and how you can become involved in helping care for this precious resource. 

  • Chasm Creek Trail #164
  • Goat Springs Trail #542
  • Lower Cedar Bench Trail #540
  • Cherry Area area description

    Recreational opportunities in the Cherry area include: camping, hiking, mountain biking, horse riding, scenic driving, and OHV riding. Trail markers will be added to the map as time allows.  For now, please use the left-hand navigation bar to find more information about the trails in the area:

    • Ash Creek #9705
    • General Crook #64
    • Medlar Springs #9706
    • Sheep #532
    • Grapevine Gulch Trail #9708

     Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this site.  

  • Ash Creek Trail #9705
  • General Crook Trail #64
  • Grapevine Gulch Trail #9708
  • Medlar Springs Trail #9706
  • Sheep Trail #532
  • Dugas - Tule Mesa area description

    Large area geographic area; encompasses riparian habitat to ponderosa pine.  Recreational opportunities include: hiking, mountain biking, horse riding, OHV trail and road riding, dispersed camping, and Sycamore Cabin, a hostoric rental cabin.  Trails in the area include:

    • Chalk Tank Trail #506
    • Cold Water Springs Trail #27
    • Double T Trail
    • Dripping Spring Trail #508
    • Hell Hole Trail #541
    • Oxbow Trail #163
    • Pasture Tank Trail #516
    • Salt Flat Trail #71
    • Short Cut Trail #166
    • Sycamore Trail #503
    • Yellow Jacket Trail #524

    Trails in the Pine Mountain Wilderness are listed separately, and are open to hikers and horse riders only.  

    Trailheads will be added to the map as time allows.  Thank you for your patience as we continue to improve this website.

  • Chalk Tank Trail #506
  • Cold Water Springs Trail #27
  • Dripping Spring Trail #508
  • Hell Hole Trail #541
  • Oxbow Trail #163
  • Pasture Tank Trail #516
  • Salt Flat Trail #71
  • Short Cut Trail #166
  • Sycamore Trail #503
  • Yellow Jacket Trail #524
  • Mingus Mountain area description

    Located in the cool pines of central Arizona, Mingus Mountain offers a wide range of recreational opportunities including: picnicking, hiking, horseback riding, mountain biking, camping, fishing, hunting, hang gliding, and paragliding.  Scroll down (below the recreation map) to learn more about the excellent recreational opportunities on Mingus Mountain.

     

    Mingus Mountain Brochure (1.86 MB) NOTE- Brochure Correction: Mingus Mountain Campground and Picnic Site do not have electricity available at this time.

    Mingus Rim Trails Description and Map (563 KB PDF; 8.5” X 11”)

  • Ash Canyon Trail #539
  • Butterfly Trail #536
  • Coleman Trail #108
  • Gaddes Trail #110
  • Gaddes Two Trail #9037
  • Little Yeager Canyon Trail #533
  • Middle Trail #537
  • North Mingus Trail #105
  • Old Dump Trail #530
  • Quail Spring Ranch Trail #512
  • Silver Trail #516
  • View Point Trail #106
  • West Rim Trail #538
  • Yeager Cabin Trail #111
  • Yeager Canyon Trail #28
  • Yeager Mine Trail #501
  • Pine Mountain Wilderness area description

    The southern-most wilderness area on the Prescott National Forest shares a boundary with the Tonto National Forest.  Recreational opportunities include: hiking, backpacking, and horse riding.  Mechanized equipment of any kind is not allowed in wilderness areas.  Trails in the Pine Mountain Wilderness include:

    • Nelson Trail #159
    • Buck Basin Trail #158
    • Pine Flat Trail #165
    • Tule Rim Trail #162
    • Verde Rim Trail #161
    • Willow Springs Trail #12

    The USFS Wilderness Stewardship brochure explains more about designated Wilderness and how you can become involved in helping care for this precious resource. 

  • Buck Basin Trail #158
  • Nelson Trail #159
  • Pine Flat Trail #165
  • Pine Mountain Trail #14
  • Tule Rim Trail #162
  • Verde Rim Trail #161
  • Willow Springs Trail #12
  • Sycamore Canyon Wilderness area description

    Established in 1935, this area contains a unique canyon-land environment. The canyon cuts through the Mogollon Rim which marks the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau. It winds for 20 miles along Sycamore Creek and at places stretches 7 miles from rim to rim. Wind and water have exposed 7 geological associations of plants and animals set in a spectacular setting of red sandstone, white limestone, and brown lava. Camping is limited by the often unreliable water sources.

    The USFS Wilderness Stewardship brochure explains more about designated Wilderness and how you can become involved in helping care for this precious resource. 

  • Deadman Pocket Trail #117
  • Henderson Trail #53
  • Packard Trail #66
  • R.R. Draw Trail #68
  • Sycamore Basin Trail #63
  • Yew Thicket Trail #52
  • Rick Tank Cutoff Trail #104
  • Woodchute Trail #102
Sours: https://www.fs.usda.gov/activity/prescott/recreation/horseriding-camping/?recid=67155&actid=104

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How To Horseback Ride with Jenny Jones in Rocky Mountains, Alberta - Explore Canada

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