2018 land rover velar review

2018 land rover velar review DEFAULT

One Week With: 2018 Land Rover Range Rover Velar S

Style without sacrifice

Land Rover Range Rover Velar Full Overview

No other SUV on the road looks like the 2018 Range Rover Velar. Closest in visual excitement would probably be the Jaguar F-Pace, which not surprisingly shares its basic platform with the Velar. But the Velar's rakishly raked roofline stands out—as do its door handles that, when the vehicle is in motion or parked and locked, automatically recede to be flush with the bodywork (and nearly invisible). Sheer style alone is undoubtedly wooing plenty of buyers into the Velar fold.

What I did not expect, now having spent some quality time at the Velar's wheel, is how little the dramatic exterior affects cabin space and versatility. You'd think that dashing roofline would cut into passenger headroom—particularly in back—but my six-foot self had plenty up front. Even in the second row, I could sit without the roof reaching down to bite me. Cargo room is a generous 34.4 cubic feet with the second row seats upright; fold them flat and the Velar can swallow 61.1 cubic feet of stuff. Driving home from Ikea with your new Flömqåvnik combination wet bar and futon has never looked so good.

My test vehicle was a Velar S, one trim up from base, with the optional "P380" supercharged 3.0-liter V-6 ($65,195). Though a number of even more luxurious trims are available, the S comes standard with such niceties as permanent all-wheel drive with Terrain Response adjustability, 19-inch alloys, perforated leather seats, two-zone climate control, keyless entry with pushbutton start, a sliding panoramic roof, a power gesture-activated tailgate, a 380-watt Meridian audio system, and two enormous color touchscreens center-stage on the dash. My tester sported only a few options, including a Drive Package ($570) with multiple active-safety systems, 10-way seats with heating front and rear ($1,020), and some interior dress up—boosting the sticker to $69,461.

Two 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder engines are available (one a diesel), but the supercharged six is likely the one you want. It's the torquiest and by far the most powerful—and given that the Velar checks in at around 4,700 pounds, you need the muscle.

The V-6 isn't the most melodious of powerplants—at times it can even get a bit strident—but it moves the Velar's prodigious mass without complaint. I never felt wanting for power. An 8-speed automatic is standard with every engine and delivers smooth, smart gear changes.

Ride quality from the adaptable air suspension (standard with the V-6) is smooth and well-damped, as you'd expect from a Range Rover, though the Velar's chassis feels biased toward the sportier side of the spectrum. The 19-inch tires aren't particularly low profile, so they're like not the culprit in contributing to the extra ride firmness. Depending on model, you can equip a Velar with 22-inch meats—which you might want to consider carefully if ride plushness is a priority.

The Velar's cockpit is nothing short of gorgeous, with top-notch materials, handsome aluminum and wood trim, a digital gauge cluster, and those two dazzling 10-inch color displays—what Land Rover calls its InControl Touch Pro Duo system. For visual impact alone the InControl screens are simply sublime; they do away with almost every conventional button or switch and present selected information clearly and stylishly. Beautiful.

That said, actually using the touchscreens can be frustrating. Many desired controls are buried in various menus and sub-menus, and the touchscreens themselves are slow to respond and occasionally fail to respond at all. A careful, decisive touch is required—not always so easy to do when on the move. Curiously and confusingly, the two rotary dials under the bottom screen are used to adjust everything from climate-system temperature to fan speed and seat heating. The driver's-side can also adjust the settings of the Terrain Response system. More than once, I felt the air suspension dropping as I accidentally changed driving modes when I was merely trying to summon a little more air in my face. For sure, a longer stint with the vehicle and more practice using InControl would undoubtedly make things easier. But the system clearly trades user-friendliness for dramatic design—and suffers for it.

Infotainment quibbles aside, the 2018 Range Rover Velar succeeds in delivering a top-tier driving experience surrounded by smashing good looks that sacrifice Land Rover's trademark capability and usefulness not at all. Most likely you wouldn't dip your lavishly trimmed Velar into a bog, but if so inclined you could do so knowing the Velar would get you through. That combo of visual glamor and multi-mission can-do is tough to beat—and rare. I mean, how often have you ever heard someone say, "Wow. What a beautiful tank."

Looks good! More details?

2018 Range Rover Velar S Specifications

ON SALENow
PRICE$65,195/$69,461 (base/as tested)
ENGINE3.0L DOHC 24-valve supercharged V-6/380 hp @ 6,500 rpm, 332 lb-ft @ 3,500
TRANSMISSION8-speed automatic
LAYOUT4-door, 5-passenger, front-engine, AWD SUV
EPA MILEAGE22/26 mpg (city/hwy)
L x W x H189.1 x 76.0 x 65.6 in
WHEELBASE113.1 in
WEIGHT4,700 lb
0-60 MPH5.6 sec
TOP SPEED155 mph
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40,000-Mile Wrap-Up

That the logbook for our long-term 2018 Range Rover Velar has been essentially devoid of comments and service records since our last update at 33,000 miles is an unusual development for a vehicle that regularly rankled our staff with frustrations and reliability issues. Our most significant takeaway from that lack of ink after spending 40,000 miles with Range Rover's stylish compact luxury ute is that our example simply had overstayed its welcome.

In fairness, our Range Rover's massive 16,000-mile scheduled service intervals were partly at fault for the tapering off of activity in its logbook. During its stay, the Velar required just two basic oil changes and inspections, totaling $461. The additional cost of certain ancillary charges related to those dealer visits, such as a hefty $187 to have three new wiper blades installed, furthered our appreciation for the Range Rover's modest level of (expected) upkeep. A $50 expenditure to patch several stone chips in the Velar's windshield is the only new line item we have to report.

Highs: Fetching exterior design, handsomely high-tech cabin, relatively spacious for its class.

Alas, our long-termer visited the dealership more than we'd like, including stopping for a recall-related warranty replacement of a leaking fuel rail on its turbo 2.0-liter inline-four and to fix (also under warranty) a broken wire in the control unit of its telematics system, which immobilized the vehicle in a staffer's driveway, necessitating a tow. Yet those are only the issues that we officially reported to the service department. We can just imagine how many days out of use the Velar would've logged had we asked the service techs to chase down every intermittent warning light, electronic glitch, and powertrain hiccup that seemingly came and went at random throughout most of its time with us. A software update installed around 27,000 miles largely cured the Velar's dual-screen InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment tablets of their propensity to freeze up and reboot while driving, but by then, the damage to our confidence and patience had already been done.

Not that the Velar had trouble eliciting opinions when it was working properly. Few drivers could deny its swanky presentation when pulling up to the curb or the upscale trappings of its high-tech cabin. Its toasty seat and steering-wheel heaters, as well as a heated and solar attenuating windshield, put it in high demand when winter storms rolled through town. And its decent size and easygoing demeanor made it a relatively capacious and capable member of the compact luxury SUV class.

Lows: Electronic glitches galore, lazy powertrain responses, obtuse infotainment system, cheap seats for $67K.

Conversely, it simply is unacceptable for an as-tested $67,235 luxury vehicle to not come standard with basic lumbar adjustment for its front seats (we would have had to pay an additional $3050 for the privilege on our mid-range P250 R-Dynamic SE model). The activation of the Ingenium four-cylinder's stop-start system shook the vehicle like an old-timey diesel engine. In practice, the Velar's touchscreen control surfaces make for a slow and clumsy arrangement even when operating as they should. And the relatively sluggish responses of the turbo four engine, coupled with Range Rover's relaxed calibration of the eight-speed automatic transmission, made our Velar less than graceful when asked to do anything quickly.

While it was not the most prolific road tripper in our long-term fleet, the Velar still managed to regularly stretch its legs throughout Michigan, as well as on voyages to Pittsburgh, Virginia, and Kentucky. Which made its 22-mpg average fuel economy—1 mpg less than its EPA combined estimate—all the more of a letdown. Dynamically, at 40,000 miles, the Velar's stopping distance from 70 mph improved by five feet, to 169 feet, versus when new, and its modest grip around the skidpad dropped a negligible 0.02 g to 0.82 g. More significant is that, despite its zero-to-60-mph time only slowing by a tenth, to 7.3 seconds during final testing, at 40,000 miles, the Velar needed nearly a second longer to accelerate from 50 to 70 mph (6.0 seconds) and almost two seconds longer to reach 100 mph (22.0 seconds).

Looks can only go so far, and had we to conduct this test all over again, we may opt for one of the Velar's more powerful and expensive models powered by a supercharged V-6 or V-8. Yet, the mix of better-performing and better-functioning luxury alternatives at those versions' even higher price points is as thick as concrete. While our perseverance for informative reporting kept the Range Rover Velar in our garage for far longer than we imagine many buyers would tolerate, a pretty face or not, we don't miss it now that it's gone.

Months in Fleet: 18 months Current Mileage: 40,108 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 22 mpg
Fuel Tank Size: 16.6 gal Observed Fuel Range: 360 miles
Service: $601 Normal Wear: $187 Repair: $0
Damage and Destruction: $50

Specifications

Specifications

2018 Range Rover Velar P250 R-Dynamic SE

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door hatchback 

PRICE AS TESTED
$67,235 (base price: $50,895)

ENGINE TYPE
turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 16-valve inline-4, aluminum block and head, direct fuel injection

Displacement
122 cu in, 1997 cc
Power
247 hp @ 5500 rpm
Torque
269 lb-ft @ 1200 rpm

TRANSMISSION
8-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): control arms/multilink
Brakes (F/R): 12.8-in vented disc/12.8-in vented disc
Tires: Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season, 255/50R-20 109W M+S LRJ

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 113.1 in
Length: 189.1 in
Width: 76.0 in 
Height: 65.6 in
Passenger volume: 99 cu ft
Cargo volume: 34 cu ft
Curb weight: 4392 lb

PERFORMANCE (NEW)
Rollout, 1 ft: 0.3 sec
60 mph: 7.2 sec
100 mph: 20.2 sec
120 mph: 36.5 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 9.1 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.8 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 5.3 sec
¼-mile: 15.5 sec @ 89 mph
Top speed (mfr's claim): 135 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 174 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.84 g 

PERFORMANCE (40,000 MILES)
Rollout, 1 ft: 0.3 sec
60 mph: 7.3 sec
100 mph: 22.0 sec
120 mph: 42.7 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 8.9 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.8 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 6.0 sec
¼-mile: 15.7 sec @ 87 mph
Top speed (mfr's claim): 135 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 169 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.82 g

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 22 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 26 mpg
Highway range: 430 miles
Unscheduled oil additions: 0 qt

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 23/21/27 mpg

WARRANTY
4 years/50,000 miles bumper to bumper;
4 years/50,000 miles powertrain;
6 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
4 years/50,000 miles roadside assistance 

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30,000-Mile Update

It's often the minor day-to-day quirks and occurrences, rather than life's big events and achievements, that guide a relationship's well-being. And so it is with our long-term 2018 Range Rover Velar, which, despite its stylish design and luxurious trappings, continues to grate on us as its odometer clicks past 33,000 miles.

Although our tony $67,235 Range Rover exudes curbside presence, many drivers struggle to find a comfortable seating position because of the electrically adjustable steering column's modest range of tilt and our particular example's lack of lumbar seat adjustment. Our complaints about Jaguar Land Rover's dual-screen InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment system have been tempered—a software update by the dealer at 27,000 miles seems to have fixed many glitches and its tendency to reboot itself middrive—but the system remains sluggish, especially upon initial startup, and less intuitive to navigate than we'd like. As with many touchscreen-heavy interfaces these days, the Velar's glossy center stack is often coated in a haze of fingerprints.

The cost of basic care since our last update has added to our regular Range Rover bothers, including the $187 the dealer charged to replace three wiper blades and the $139 we shelled out to have service techs clean leaves out of the (still-new) cabin air filter, which had made it sound as if a playing card were stuck in the blower motor of the truck's climate-control system. That's on top of the $283 we paid for the Velar's scheduled 32,000-mile service visit that included an oil change, inspection, and the aforementioned cabin air-filter replacement.

A particularly worrisome unscheduled warranty repair was required at nearly 31,000 miles to fix a broken wire in the Velar's telematics control unit, which immobilized the vehicle in the driveway at a staffer's home. This necessitated a tow to the dealership, which sounds simpler than it turned out to be.

When the tow truck arrived, we learned that the Velar's electronics had failed to sufficiently prevent its electronic rotary shifter from operating, effectively leaving the transmission stuck in park and the pop-up dial planted in its lowered position. The owner's manual instructed us to cycle the system through a series of commands to restore the dial's functionality. When that didn't work, we searched for a manual release in or near the console, perhaps under the cupholder insert as in some other JLR products. But no.

Resorting to an internet search, we learned that the emergency shifter release is a cable-and-lever arrangement hidden beneath the plastic engine cover, and we finally got the Velar onto the flatbed. Digging deeper into the printed manual after the fact revealed the following: "The recovery agent must activate the transmission park release before recovery commences. The procedure is covered in a separate publication for service personnel. Failure to activate the transmission park release can result in serious transmission damage." Our "recovery agent" was a AAA tow-truck driver sent by the dealer and was not privy to this separate publication. Pity any owner lacking the technical acumen to solve the towing problem, let alone our advantage of a fleet full of vehicles and a pair of road warriors standing by to make the 96-mile round trip to drop a substitute in the driveway.

While a check-engine light triggered by a known fault from the 2.0-liter inline-four's fuel-rail pressure sensor didn't strand us, it did require a separate dealer visit to correct, which included reflashing the control units for the engine and the transmission.

Despite the onset of spring in the Midwest and the refitting of the Rover's stock Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season tires, our ute has stayed relatively close to its Metro Detroit base, which has kept its average fuel economy at 22 mpg—1 mpg less than its combined EPA estimate. Overshadowed only by our 2018 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio as the most troublesome vehicle in our current long-term fleet, the Velar, with its irksome ergonomics and cantankerous operation, continues to earn little favor as it closes in on 40,000 miles. Had we tied the knot with our own money, we definitely would have sought out relationship counseling by now.

Months in Fleet: 14 months Current Mileage: 33,464 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 22 mpg
Fuel Tank Size: 16.6 gal Observed Fuel Range: 360 miles
Service: $601 Normal Wear: $187 Repair: $0


20,000-Mile Update

WHAT WE LIKE: Now past the halfway point of its 40,000-mile stay, our 2018 Range Rover Velar continues to exude a swanky presence wherever it goes, and it offers enough cargo space behind the rear seats (a class-leading 34 cubic feet) to ensure its occupants have everything they need once they arrive. The Velar also is a well-mannered road tripper, with both good stability at highway speeds and decent composure when the roads become more challenging. While our excursions off the beaten path have been minimal, consisting of windy, two-track trials that most all-wheel-drive crossovers likely could navigate, it's comforting to know that our Rover's optional Terrain Response 2 system will let it crawl over rougher ground with relative ease. That we've refitted a set of Pirelli Scorpion Winter tires in place of the stock all-season rubber means that we can expect our Velar to conquer the white stuff when it begins to pile up.

WHAT WE DON’T LIKE: Less enjoyable have been the Range Rover's ongoing electronic glitches that manifest as frustratingly temporary hiccups. Since our last update, noted short-lived episodes have included the climate-control system blasting hot air on a summer's day despite being set at 68 degrees, hyperactive parking and collision-warning sensors that occasionally sound alerts when creeping forward in a line of traffic, and a recalcitrant electronic rotary shift knob that sometimes refuses to move from its D setting. The InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment system's dual touchscreens also remain a point of contention with their less than optimal ergonomic layout, slow responses, and tendency to momentarily go dark and reboot while we're driving. On occasion, the screens have even frozen up and ignored both touch inputs and those from the steering-wheel controls until the Velar is shut off and allowed to sit for a few minutes before restarting. "The Velar makes me swear in front of my children, which I rarely do," one driver wrote in the logbook. We also echo our previous complaints regarding the lack of lumbar adjustability in our Velar's front seats, the clunky engine stop/start system, and that the Velar often automatically shuts itself off when engaging park.

WHAT WENT WRONG: Other than the sporadic and varied electronic gremlins that never stick around long enough to warrant a trip to the dealer, the Velar has been trouble-free since our last update. The Rover's long, 16,000-mile service intervals mean our scheduled visits are few and far between.

WHERE WE WENT: While the four-cylinder Velar has mostly lived a commuter's life in southeastern Michigan—which hasn't helped to boost its 22-mpg average fuel economy, 1 mpg less than its combined EPA estimate—it has ventured to the western side of the state, made a quick jaunt to Indiana, and completed one near-1500-mile road trip to Tennessee and back.

Months in Fleet: 9 months Current Mileage: 22,096 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 22 mpg
Fuel Tank Size: 16.6 gal Observed Fuel Range: 360 miles
Service: $178 Normal Wear: $0 Repair: $0


10,000-Mile Update

WHAT WE LIKE: With its chiseled visage, chopped-top proportions, and concept-car interior presentation, our long-term Land Rover Range Rover Velar has an undeniably dashing aesthetic presence—one that some drivers have opined justifies the $67,000 price of entry by itself. Confident if uninspired handling and a healthy amount of cargo space behind the rear seats (34 cubic feet) has made it a popular choice for road-trippers, and the crisp infotainment graphics and luxury trappings of our R-Dynamic SE model have helped maintain a sophisticated vibe. It may be one of the junior models in Range Rover's hierarchy, but the Velar is never short on class.

WHAT WE DON'T LIKE: When that classiness is interrupted by the smell of gasoline from under the hood (more on that in a minute), intermittent and annoying glitches from the dual-touchscreen infotainment system, and front seats in which many drivers continue to struggle to get comfortable. While we haven't experienced any major electronic seizures since our last update, our affection for Jaguar Land Rover's InControl Touch Pro Duo interface remains hit or miss given its lethargic boot-up process, complex layout, and occasionally unresponsive controls. That all of the electronics-based issues have been short-lived—disappearing after cycling the engine or letting the vehicle sit overnight—has been both a relief and a frustration. And although some drivers have come away from long hours in the saddle with minimal gripes, our general regret for not upgrading our Velar's fixed-lumbar 10-way power-adjustable front seats to the available 20-way units with lumbar control—a $3050 upcharge—is firmly entrenched.

Other, lesser niggles that have worked into the Velar's logbook include a rather unrefined engine stop/start system that defaults to the "on" position with every startup and the tendency for the eight-speed automatic transmission to lug the turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four at low revs in a high gear, which produces a grumbling resonance inside the cabin. While power from the Ingenium four-cylinder is fully adequate on the move, the gearbox's recalcitrance to downshift combined with the slight pause it takes for the engine to build boost pressure can make the Velar's throttle response feel sluggish.

WHAT WENT WRONG: Aside from the occasional electronic gremlins, our long-termer's only major problem thus far stemmed from the 2.0-liter engine's fuel-injection rail, the end caps of which began leaking fuel into the engine bay around 12,000 miles. This is a known issue with some four-cylinder Velars that prompted JLR to issue a recall notice in February 2018, and a quick trip to the dealer resulted in the fuel rail and all four fuel injectors being replaced under warranty. To date, our only expense has been $178 for a scheduled oil and filter change and inspection at just shy of 16,000 miles.

WHERE WE WENT: Despite its capaciousness and versatility, our Rover has largely lived a suburban-chic life so far, mostly staying close to home as a commuter around southeastern Michigan. The fuel-system recall canceled a potential trek into Canada for the Velar, although it did accompany us to Virginia International Raceway for our annual Lightning Lap event as well as make brief jaunts to Pittsburgh and Chicago since our last update. Stretching its legs on those trips helped boost our overall average fuel economy to 22 mpg, just 1 mpg less than the EPA's combined estimate.

Months in Fleet: 7 months Current Mileage: 15,926 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 22 mpg
Fuel Tank Size: 16.6 gal Observed Fuel Range: 360 miles
Service: $178 Normal Wear: $0 Repair: $0


Introduction

Despite the intrinsic constraints that an SUV’s utilitarian packaging can place on its designers, few can argue with the truly fetching two-box form that Jaguar Land Rover’s sculptors have made for the new-for-2018 Range Rover Velar crossover. But the Velar is more than just a pretty face positioned in the middle of Range Rover’s lineup of luxury utes: It also is outfitted with JLR’s new dual-screen capacitive-touch infotainment interface, which bolsters its case as a compelling subject for the 40,000-mile obstacle course that is our long-term test regimen.

While the Velar plays in a segment that includes the Audi Q5 and the BMW X3, its 189.1-inch length puts it curiously close to the larger Range Rover Sport, not to mention within spitting distance of the Jaguar F-Pace and the Land Rover Discovery within the JLR empire. Generous cargo space is a result of its sizable footprint, as the Velar tops its class with 34 cubic feet of storage behind the second row and 70 cubes with the 40/20/40 split-folding rear seats stowed almost flat.

Dressed to Impress

We’ve had ample experience with JLR’s supercharged 3.0-liter V-6, which, along with a turbocharged 2.0-liter diesel inline-four, serves as the Velar’s uplevel powertrain. So for this test we deferred to its base engine, a gasoline-burning turbo 2.0-liter inline-four. Output is a decent 247 horsepower at 5500 rpm and 269 lb-ft of torque at just 1200 revs. A ZF-sourced eight-speed automatic is included, as is a full-time all-wheel-drive system with Rover’s Terrain Response system of selectable driving modes (Eco, Dynamic, Comfort, Grass/Gravel/Snow, Mud/Ruts, and Sand). Compared with the V-6–powered Velar P380 model we previously tested, our 4392-pound long-term vehicle weighs 284 pounds less.

Pricing for the entry-level P250 trim level starts at $50,895, but MSRPs can top $90K with the V-6 and a handful of options, including numerous interior color schemes and trim finishes. Our P250 R-Dynamic SE test car, which sits one rung below the top-spec R-Dynamic HSE model, started at $61,095 and features a coil-spring suspension rather than the adaptive air springs that come with the V-6, brake-based torque vectoring, full-LED head- and taillights, and darkened 20-inch wheels (18- to 22-inchers are available) wrapped with Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season tires, size 255/50R-20. Other standard SE equipment includes automated emergency braking, lane-departure warning, a driver-condition monitor, a 360-degree surround-view parking assistant, specific front and rear fascias, heated and power-folding exterior mirrors with puddle lamps, and copper-colored accents on the hood and front flanks.

The Velar’s concept-car presentation carries into the modernist cabin with a 12.3-inch digital gauge cluster (on SE models and above) and the twin 10.0-inch InControl Touch Pro Duo infotainment screens in the center stack. Materials, including the satin-aluminum trim pieces and the geometric-patterned dash and door inserts, are attractive and feel high in quality. And there are ample amenities, including a panoramic sunroof, keyless entry and start, dual-zone automatic climate control, navigation, and an 825-watt Meridian audio system with 17 speakers.

Helping to inflate our example’s final tally to $67,235 was a $610 coat of Santorini Black paint and the $1495 Drive Pro package (adaptive cruise control, blind-spot monitoring, lane-keeping assist, and traffic-sign recognition). We also tacked on $1330 for front-seat heating and ventilation and heated rear seats, $615 for SiriusXM satellite radio, and $580 for the On/Off-Road package’s adaptive Terrain Response 2 system, All Terrain Progress Control (low-speed off-road cruise control), and configurable chassis and powertrain settings. Other extras included a $510 power-adjustable steering column, a $385 heated windshield, a $255 heated steering wheel, $205 for Argento Pinstripe interior trim, and $155 for a pair of USB ports in the second row.

Hitting the Road

While our long-termer’s black exterior and rose-goldish trim elements lend it a somewhat sinister vibe versus warmer color combinations we’ve seen, the Velar’s chopped-top silhouette and striking interior décor have earned it plenty of admirers. The power-extending door handles are a bit gimmicky—and they advertise when the vehicle is left unlocked—but overall the Velar positively nails the Range Rover aesthetic.

That it arrived at C/D HQ in February prompted us to fit a set of OE-size Pirelli Scorpion Winter tires ($250 each from Tire Rack) to get us through Michigan’s remaining cold months. A lengthy 2000-mile break-in period and extended winter weather delayed both our reinstallation of the all-season rubber and our visit to the test track. When we finally got there, the Velar did the zero-to-60-mph dash in a modest 7.2 seconds and covered the quarter-mile in 15.5 at 89 mph—adequately peppy but well off the 380-hp V-6’s times of 5.7 and 14.2 seconds. Its so-so 0.84 g of stick on the skidpad is par for the segment, as is its 174-foot stop from 70 mph.

We’ve otherwise taken it easy on the Velar, with initial logbook observations noting the ample power from the 2.0-liter engine but also some unimpressive clatter at idle. The P250 moves with little athleticism, and its tonnage means the four-cylinder rarely gets a break, but the eight-speed automatic shifts unobtrusively and pairs well with the engine’s surge of low-end torque. While the Velar never goads us into searching out back roads, its competent body control and generally comfortable suspension make it an easy cruiser elsewhere.

Less favorable have been the reactions to the P250’s fuel economy, which is EPA-estimated at 21 mpg city and 27 highway. We’ve averaged only 20 mpg thus far, which, with the Velar’s rather small 16.6-gallon fuel tank, means we’re usually filling up every 300 miles or so. Even at the 26 mpg that our long-termer returned on our 75-mph highway test loop, that’s only about 400 miles between fill-ups. Blame the Velar’s hefty curb weight for much of its thirst (the P250’s 23-mpg combined rating is 3 mpg better than the more powerful supercharged V-6’s).

A Familiar Future

Electronic gremlins have plagued several recent JLR test cars, including our last long-term Range Rover, a 2016 Td6 diesel model, so it was with mild trepidation that we welcomed this specimen into our fleet. It’s not surprising, then, that the most prominent comments in the Velar’s logbook have centered on its high-tech computer interface. For all its functionality and high-resolution graphics, the learning curve is relatively steep, and its extensive configurability has prompted even tech-savvy drivers to chide it for being overly complex. Others have acclimated more quickly, but having so few physical controls on hand means that interacting with the two tablets on the console is impossible to avoid.

The upper screen is largely responsible for audio, navigation, phone, and settings functions, with the lower primarily used for climate controls and the myriad driving-mode setups. But along with the configurability of the digital gauge cluster, many of the display functions, such as audio information, can be shown simultaneously on multiple screens; the two rotary control knobs integrated into the lower screen serve multiple purposes, depending on the function toggled on the display. Using them can adjust cabin temperature, fan speed, or seat heating and ventilation levels, as well as driving-mode settings (driver’s side only). We’ll likely grow more accustomed to the setup and fidget with it less as we configure it to our liking, but it still presents a lot of options to sort through while driving.

As we’ve experienced with previous JLR systems, touch inputs for the dual screens also occasionally respond slowly and inconsistently. And one morning, at just 2650 miles, both displays failed to awake when the vehicle was started. Although the audio system resumed where it had left off the day before—albeit without any way to adjust it—none of the other functions worked, and the computer refused to reboot itself even after multiple ignition cycles. The Velar apparently just needed a rest, as its systems were back to normal the following morning; since there was no way to re-create the issue and no warning code to analyze and clear, a trip to the dealer likely would have been unproductive. Another glitch occurred at about 3450 miles, when the center portion of the digital instrument cluster began scrolling wildly and was unable to properly render the navigation display. This time a tap of the Menu button on the steering wheel returned it to working order.

More frustrating was a temporary powertrain glitch at around 4400 miles, which seemed to prevent the 2.0-liter turbo engine from making any boost. “There was no check-engine light or any stumbling, but I could run the engine to redline with my foot on the floor while accelerating with all the might of an ’84 Ford Fiesta,” testing director K.C. Colwell wrote in the logbook. The incident persisted through multiple ignition cycles and also affected the transmission, which refused to kick down even when pressing the accelerator past the detent in its travel. As with the infotainment issue, the gremlins were gone the following morning and the problem has yet to resurface.

Taking a Seat

Other commenters have taken issue with the Velar’s 10-way-adjustable front seats, which have eight-way power adjustments for the bottom cushion and seatback and two-way manual adjustments for the bulky headrests. What’s lacking is any type of lumbar control—a frustrating omission both at the Velar’s price point and given the excessively padded lumbar section of the seatback, which many drivers have deemed uncomfortable. Although stepping up to the $68,595 P250 HSE model would bring fancier 20-way-adjustable chairs with massage and lumbar control, those would have cost an extra $3050 on this SE. We’ve also noticed that dash-mounted toll-road transponders such as E-ZPass have trouble operating through the Velar’s heated, solar-attenuating windshield, with one driver having to hold the unit out of the open sunroof so as not to cause a backup at the tollbooth.

The Velar’s 16,000-mile intervals for scheduled maintenance combined with a lack of any lasting issues means our long-termer has yet to visit the dealer. Our only expenditures have been for fuel and for purchasing and swapping out the winter tires. While the Velar has made one trek to Pittsburgh, the bulk of its early miles have been racked up on local commutes, along with a couple of short trips to western Michigan and Ohio. Although we have several issues to keep an eye on—and some drivers have already ruled out the Velar for long-haul travel due to its lumpy front seats—its stylishly tailored practicality should help it accumulate its remaining 32,700 miles in fairly short order.

Months in Fleet: 3 months Current Mileage: 7257 miles
Average Fuel Economy: 20 mpg
Fuel Tank Size: 16.6 gal Fuel Range: 330 miles
Service: $0 Normal Wear: $0 Repair: $0

Specifications

Specifications

2018 Range Rover Velar P250 R-Dynamic SE

VEHICLE TYPE
front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door hatchback 

PRICE AS TESTED
$67,235 (base price: $50,895)

ENGINE TYPE
turbocharged and intercooled DOHC 16-valve inline-4, aluminum block and head, direct fuel injection

Displacement
122 cu in, 1997 cc
Power
247 hp @ 5500 rpm
Torque
269 lb-ft @ 1200 rpm

TRANSMISSION
8-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS
Suspension (F/R): control arms/multilink
Brakes (F/R): 12.8-in vented disc/12.8-in vented disc
Tires: Pirelli Scorpion Verde All Season, 255/50R-20 109W M+S LRJ

DIMENSIONS
Wheelbase: 113.1 in
Length: 189.1 in
Width: 76.0 in 
Height: 65.6 in
Passenger volume: 99 cu ft
Cargo volume: 34 cu ft
Curb weight: 4392 lb

PERFORMANCE (NEW)
Rollout, 1 ft: 0.3 sec
60 mph: 7.2 sec
100 mph: 20.2 sec
120 mph: 36.5 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 9.1 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.8 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 5.3 sec
¼-mile: 15.5 sec @ 89 mph
Top speed (mfr's claim): 135 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 174 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.84 g 

PERFORMANCE (40,000 MILES)
Rollout, 1 ft: 0.3 sec
60 mph: 7.3 sec
100 mph: 22.0 sec
120 mph: 42.7 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 8.9 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.8 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 6.0 sec
¼-mile: 15.7 sec @ 87 mph
Top speed (mfr's claim): 135 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 169 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.82 g

C/D
FUEL ECONOMY
Observed: 22 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 26 mpg
Highway range: 430 miles
Unscheduled oil additions: 0 qt

EPA FUEL ECONOMY
Combined/city/highway: 23/21/27 mpg

WARRANTY
4 years/50,000 miles bumper to bumper;
4 years/50,000 miles powertrain;
6 years/unlimited miles corrosion protection;
4 years/50,000 miles roadside assistance 

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Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/a25574981/2018-range-rover-velar-reliability-maintenance-20k-update/
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Overview

Compact luxury crossovers are a cliquey bunch. The Porsche Macan is the hot hatch, the Mercedes-Benz GLC-Class is the luxury choice, and the Audi Q5 is the nondescript sales winner. Land Rover’s Range Rover Velar is the stylish one, leveraging the brand's signature rectilinearity against slim lights and a tapering roof for visual pop. Two new touchscreen displays wow occupants and drastically reduce the cabin’s hard-button count. All-wheel drive and a turbocharged four-cylinder engine are standard; a diesel four-cylinder and a supercharged V-6 are available.

What's New for 2018?

The Velar is all new for this year. Land Rover aims it at the space between the smaller Evoque and the (barely) larger Range Rover Sport in the 2018 lineup. Sharing its bones and four- and six-cylinder engine choices with the Jaguar F-Pace, the Velar is similarly plus-sized for the compact luxury segment.

Pricing

Original MSRP:

  • Base: $50,895
  • S: $55,695
  • SE: $61,095
  • HSE: $68,595
  • First Edition: $90,295

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

Every Velar model gets an eight-speed automatic transmission and all-wheel drive, but those features get paired with one of three flawed engines. The base 247-hp turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four is well behaved enough, but it struggles to move the Velar’s substantial heft. The available 180-hp turbodiesel four-cylinder makes up for its relaxed power delivery with substantial torque, but its clattery soundtrack disappointingly penetrates the Velar’s cabin. Ditto the supercharged 380-hp 3.0-liter V-6, which is powerful but drinks plenty of fuel and transmits a gritty song through the dash, too. The Velar goes down the road in a generally comfortable and competent manner, without the sporty edge that defines its close cousin, the Jaguar F-Pace. Much like the Velar’s acceleration, its handling is by no means sporty, but the suspension ably returns a firm, well-managed ride.

Fuel Economy

EPA fuel-economy testing and reporting procedures have changed over time. For the latest numbers on current and older vehicles, visit the EPA’s website and select Find & Compare Cars.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

The Velar’s cabin is among the nicest and best-styled in its class. The materials used throughout are high quality and deployed in interesting ways. Perhaps the stunning interior’s greatest success is that its haute look comes at no expense of practicality. Standard equipment is generous and includes power front seats, dual-zone climate control, and futuristic-looking dual dashboard touchscreen displays. The Velar’s profile might be more swept than other Range Rovers, but it’s still a Range Rover, meaning it is fundamentally a large box. Such shapes are a boon to headroom and cargo space, both of which the Velar has plenty of. To further increase cargo room, the seats fold nearly flat, both via seatback levers and trunk-mounted release handles.

Infotainment and Connectivity

It is particularly ambitious of Land Rover, a company that has historically struggled with infotainment performance, to introduce the dual-screen InControl Touch Pro Duo system. Alas, the system is prone to glitches and suffers from menus that take time to decipher and use. InControl Touch Pro Duo is standard on every Velar and includes two 10.0-inch touchscreens, Bluetooth connectivity, voice control, eight speakers, an auxiliary audio-input jack, and two USB ports. A better audio system with more speakers, navigation, and SiriusXM satellite radio requires adding options or moving up through trim levels.

Safety Features and Crash Test Ratings

For more information about the Land Rover Range Rover Velar’s crash-test results, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) websites.

Warranty

Some older vehicles are still eligible for coverage under a manufacturer's Certified Pre-Owned (CPO) program. For more information visit our guide to every manufacturer's CPO program.

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/land-rover/range-rover-velar-2018
2018 Range Rover Velar review

Our Range Rover Velar After One Year: Would We Recommend It?

This SUV has a few surprises up its sleeves

Land Rover Range Rover Velar Full Overview

There have been three memorable moments involving Land Rovers in my life.

The first time I saw one, an original Range Rover, all black and tinted, was in 1985, on I-94 near the Illinois-Wisconsin border. Back then, SUVs weren't really a thing. Sure, I had seen a couple Jeep Grand Wagoneers, an International Scout, and a Suburban or two out on the road, but they were for ranchers, fishermen, and hunters. This was a statement. I thought I knew about cars, but I had never even heard of a Range Rover. It was stately. It was glamorous. It was elegant. It positively exuded status and wealth. I vowed on that day I would own one.

My second memory was the inimitable David E. Davis' lengthy column in a mid-1990s issue of our sister magazine, Automobile. David E. had long professed his love for these iconoclastic English vehicles, looking beyond their checkered reliability into their innate essence of class and privilege. Everyone thought David E. was nuts to love Land Rovers so much. And then, one day, after his long-term Landie had defecated the Serta one too many times, David E. blew a gasket. His multipage screed listed every niggle, wiggle, whistle, rattle, claptrap, fault, error, or breakage his Land Rover had suffered—placing it in the repair shop more often than on the road. It was a stunning tirade of shock and awe, a true loss of faith. I vowed on that day I would never own one.

The third was the day Erick Ayapana, the Keeper of the Keys in the MotorTrend long-term test-vehicle domain, informed me that my upcoming yearlong vehicular relationship was to be with a Land Rover Range Rover Velar. To say I was conflicted would be an understatement.

But in the past 12 months and 25,000 miles of "ownership," I have developed a love-love relationship with this Velar—more sleek than stately, more go-go than glamour. And most definitely reliable. David E. would never believe it.

Fast, powerful, adroit, and graceful, the Velar is a new chapter for the Land Rover franchise. Oh, sure, you can be a purist and get a Range Rover, with its bulldog stance and snobby manner. But the Velar is what the cool kids drive. I can think of no other mass-luxury brand that so equitably serves two such distinct masters.

Our Velar is a sculpture of sweeping exquisite beauty. Even though it has been on sale going on two years, our Byron Blue Velar was still receiving admiring looks from the quickly jaded denizens of coastal Los Angeles. In fact, a Velar has become one of the more frequent luxury vehicles I see in my everyday commute up the coast.

For a 4,500-pound vehicle with a 375-hp supercharged engine pulling a sub-6-second 0-60 sprint, the Velar returned a respectable 19.4 mpg in combined city/highway driving in its year of service. Nonetheless, our model's 16.5-gallon fuel tank increased to 21.6 gallons for the 2019 model year. That's a good thing because the 2018 model had you eyeballing the gas gauge as soon as you crested 200 miles on the trip meter. Talk about range anxiety.

What's more, the interior is everything a Range Rover snob would ask for, anyway. Opulent leather, a sweeping dashboard and center stack, and plush leather seats make you feel like a king, or at least a baron. Best of all, the second row is as nice as the front. If you're worried about the comfort of wee Mason and Sophia, they'll be fine back there. The plush leather seats (which clean up easily even when ordered in Oyster) feel luxuriant. And the rear seats recline, so if Taylor is a bit of a bratty seat-kicker, those up front should be out of range of his size-5 checkerboard Vans.

Are you an audiophile? If yes, then the Velar might be the crossover for you. The 17-speaker, 825-watt Meridian stereo system is both thunderous and crisp. I've driven thousands of vehicles and tested thousands of their stereos, and this is in the Top 10 of all car stereos I've experienced.

That said, read the fine print when ordering. The options list is inscrutable. You'd think for $76,000, a Velar would come with things like lumbar support and adaptive cruise control. After all, that's a huge leap from the $50,975 base price. But our 2018 model lacked those features. Although it appears the options list was simplified for 2019, order carefully.

Land Rovers have historically had a horrible reputation in the J.D. Power Initial Quality Study (evaluating problems within 90 days of ownership) and Vehicle Dependability Study (which looks back over three years of ownership). But we suffered nary a problem, aside from the occasional squeak from the sunroof tray and a minor electrical gremlin. Granted, this is a survey sample of one; your mileage may vary.

Our total expenses were a shade under 500 bucks, but only $282.79 was for a required maintenance (one oil/filter/vehicle inspection). There was a $29.99 charge to fix a tire with a nail in it and an additional very-much-worth-it $184.99 charge to upgrade the infotainment system to handle CarPlay for my iPhone. (Note: Do this, as the Land Rover infotainment system is archaic, and the mobile app is a disaster.) The Velar lineup has had three recalls since its 2018 launch—typical for a new vehicle from any brand—but our particular P380 SE R-Dynamic got away scot-free.

How does this cost compare to other luxury brands? Well, our recent long-term Jaguar F-Pace had zero maintenance costs, as it's covered as part of the new-vehicle warranty. This is intriguing because Jaguar and Land Rover are sold under the same roof, and while Jaguar has free maintenance (likely baked into the transaction price), Land Rover only offers "pre-paid" maintenance over a set period, paid in advance by the customer as a separate transactional line item. For comparison, although a segment smaller, our Mercedes-Benz GLC 300 4Matic had two regularly scheduled visits to the dealer for two oil changes and inspections, new engine and cabin air filters, and a brake fluid flush, which came out to $1,000.43. Ouch.

Does the Velar hold its value? Does it ever. Our IntelliChoice affiliate calculated a three-years-from-new value of $56,400, which at 74 percent of its sticker price is "interestingly high," according to our data crunchers. One caveat: As the Velar is still a newish vehicle, there's not a lot of data to base such a projection on. But due to its popularity and relative reliability, it appears Land Rover has a winner here.

Of such excellence are memories made.

Looks good! More details?

Read more about our long-term Range Rover Velar R-Dynamic SE:

Our Car
SERVICE LIFE 12 mo / 23,845 mi
BASE PRICE $70,595
OPTIONS Power-adjustable heated/cooled front seats, heated rear seats ($1,330); Premium interior protection and storage ($699); Satellite radio ($615); Byron Blue metallic paint ($610); Power-adjustable steering column ($510); Roof rails ($410); Heated windshield ($385); Heated steering wheel ($255); Rear seat convenience package ($229); USB ports ($205); Chrome wheel locks and stem caps ($139); Car care kit ($59)
PRICE AS TESTED $76,041
AVG ECON/CO2 19.4 mpg / 1.00 lb/mi
PROBLEM AREAS None
MAINTENANCE COST $282.79 (oil change, inspection)
NORMAL-WEAR COST $0
3-YEAR RESIDUAL VALUE* $56,400
RECALLS None
*IntelliChoice data; assumes 42,000 miles at the end of 3-years
2018 Land Rover Range Rover Velar P380 SE R-Dynamic
DRIVETRAIN LAYOUT Front-engine, AWD
ENGINE TYPE Supercharged 60-deg V-6, alum block/heads
VALVETRAIN DOHC, 4 valves/cyl
DISPLACEMENT 182.8 cu in/2,995 cc
COMPRESSION RATIO 10.5:1
POWER (SAE NET) 375 hp @ 6,500 rpm
TORQUE (SAE NET) 332 lb-ft @ 3,500 rpm
REDLINE 6,500 rpm
WEIGHT TO POWER 12.1 lb/hp
TRANSMISSION 8-speed automatic
AXLE/FINAL-DRIVE RATIO 3.73:1/2.49:1
SUSPENSION, FRONT; REAR Control arms, air springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar; multilink, air springs, adj shocks, anti-roll bar
STEERING RATIO 15.4:1
TURNS LOCK-TO-LOCK 2.5
BRAKES, F; R 13.8-in vented disc; 12.8-in vented disc, ABS
WHEELS, F;R 8.5 x 20-in; cast aluminum
TIRES, F;R 255/50R20 109W (M+S) Pirelli Scorpion Verde
DIMENSIONS
WHEELBASE 113.1 in
TRACK, F/R 64.7/65.5 in
LENGTH x WIDTH x HEIGHT 189.1 x 76.0 x 65.6 in
GROUND CLEARANCE 8.4-9.9 in
APPRCH/DEPART ANGLE 25.9-28.9/27.3-29.5 deg
TURNING CIRCLE 38.1 ft
CURB WEIGHT 4,547 lb
WEIGHT DIST, F/R 50/50%
TOWING CAPACITY 5,511 lb
SEATING CAPACITY 5
HEADROOM, F/R 38.2/38.0 in
LEGROOM, F/R 40.3/37.2 in
SHOULDER ROOM, F/R 57.2/55.6 in
CARGO VOLUME BEH F/R 61.1/23.8 cu ft
TEST DATA
ACCELERATION TO MPH
0-30 2.0 sec
0-40 3.0
0-50 4.2
0-60 5.7
0-70 7.3
0-80 9.4
0-90 11.8
0-100 14.9
PASSING, 45-65 MPH 2.9
QUARTER MILE 14.2 sec @ 97.7 mph
BRAKING, 60-0 MPH 124 ft
LATERAL ACCELERATION 0.84 g (avg)
MT FIGURE EIGHT 26.2 sec @ 0.70 g (avg)
TOP-GEAR REVS @ 60 MPH 1,700 rpm
CONSUMER INFO
BASE PRICE $70,595
PRICE AS TESTED $76,041
STABILITY/TRACTION CONTROL Yes/Yes
AIRBAGS 6: Dual front, front side, f/r curtain
BASIC WARRANTY 4 yrs/50,000 miles
POWERTRAIN WARRANTY 4 yrs/50,000 miles
ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE 4 yrs/50,000 miles
FUEL CAPACITY 16.6 gal
REAL MPG, CITY/HWY/COMB 20.7/27.5/23.3 mpg
EPA CITY/HWY/COMB ECON 18/24/20 mpg
ENERGY CONS, CITY/HWY 187/140 kW-hrs/100 miles
CO2 EMISSIONS, COMB 0.96 lb/mile
RECOMMENDED FUEL Unleaded premium
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Sours: https://www.motortrend.com/reviews/2018-range-rover-velar-r-dynamic-se-long-term-verdict/

Velar review 2018 land rover

Maybe. Oleg thought about it. Maybe talk to Irina. But why. Oleg never appreciated her as a woman, she is a friend to him.

4 Year Review of my Range Rover Velar! Still Worth Buying?

The girl opened the case and first of all, read a small note, and then, taking out a lighter from the glove compartment, she. Burned it. -Sadomazo means we love. - she muttered. -What did you say.

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