20 day moving average thinkorswim

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Let’s Get Technical: 3 thinkorswim® Indicators to Help Find and Follow Trends

How can you spot a market trend? Try several trend-following technical indicators. Three of the more popular ones are moving averages, MACD, and Parabolic SAR.

By John McNichol January 5, 2021 6 min read

https://tickertapecdn.tdameritrade.com/assets/images/pages/md/downhill skiing: trend-following indicators

6 min read

Photo by Getty Images

Key Takeaways

  • Three popular trend-following indicators are moving averages, moving average convergence divergence (MACD), and Parabolic SAR
  • Get to know trend-following indicators by experimenting with different ones

  • Trend-following indicators can be used on their own or combined with other indicators

Many traders, especially those using technical analysis in their trading, often focus on trends. And for good reason: Prices are constantly changing, sometimes very quickly. Traders like to catch these changing prices hoping to ride them out, regardless of whether they’re short- or long-lived. Trend identification is so popular that there are many sayings related to trends, such as:

  • Don’t fight the trend.
  • The trend is your friend.
  • The trend is your friend until the end when it bends.

But how do you find the trend in the first place? 

Pull up a chart of the Dow Jones Industrial Average ($DJI) for the last 100 years and it’s easy to spot the overriding trend—up—but that’s not necessarily going to help you trade or manage your portfolio. In that 100-year period, there have been numerous uptrends and downtrends, some lasting years and even decades.

Trends occur across all different time frames, and it’s often said the earlier you spot a trend, the more opportunity you may have to capitalize on it. But that’s easier said than done. The nice thing is there are many indicators you can use to identify possible trends, such as linear regression, price envelopes, ADX, and Keltner channels. Three of the more popular ones are moving averages, moving average convergence divergence (MACD), and Parabolic SAR.

1. Moving Averages

A moving average is one of the more popular ways to identify a trend, but there are different types. And not all moving averages are created equal. Two of the more common types of moving averages are the simple moving average (SMA) and exponential moving average (EMA). 

An SMA is calculated by totaling the closing price of a security over a set period and then dividing that total by the number of time periods.

For example, the calculation for a 10-period SMA would be as follows:

  • CP = closing price
  • Number = period
  • SMA = (CP1 + CP2 + CP3 + CP4 + CP5 + CP6 + CP7 + CP8 +CP9 + CP10) / 10

The periods used for the calculation could be anything from minutes to years.

The SMA gives equal weighting to each time period, which makes it well suited for identifying longer-term trends. If the security is above the moving average and the moving average is going up, it’s an indication of an uptrend. If the stock is trading below an uptrending moving average, it’s still an uptrend, but it might be weakening. A downtrend occurs when the price is below the moving average and the moving average is pointing down.

Adding indicators to the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade is a breeze. Say you want to overlay an SMA on a price chart. From the Charts tab, bring up a chart. Select Studies > Add study > Moving Averages. You’ll see a pretty extensive list of the different types of moving averages. Select SimpleMovingAvg and you’ll see the SMA plotted on the chart. The default is the nine-period SMA. To change it, select the indicator, then Edit study SimpleMovingAvg (CLOSE, 9, 0, no) and change length to 50. This will plot the 50-period SMA on the chart (see figure 1).

FIGURE 1: SPX WITH 50-DAY SMA. On this chart of the S&P 500 Index (SPX) with the 50-day simple moving average (SMA) overlaid on it (purple), the overall trend looks to be up. If price fell below the moving average, it’d be an indication the index is getting weaker. Chart source: the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

One of the choices under the Moving Averages thinkorswim studies is the EMA, listed as MovAvgExponential. The EMA differs from the SMA in that its calculation assigns more weight to recent prices, making it more responsive to short-term price action. Thus, the EMA tends to be favored among many short-term traders. Try adding the EMA on an intraday chart (see figure 2).

FIGURE 2: SPX 10-MIN INTRADAY CHART WITH 10-MIN EMA. In this intraday chart of the SPX, you can see a 10-minute exponential moving average (blue). Because the more recent prices have a higher weighting, the EMA tends to adjust to price action quicker than an SMA. Chart source: the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

The type of moving average and time periods you might choose will depend on your preferred trading style and time horizon, so you might want to experiment with them to see which is optimal for your purposes. 

2. Moving Average Convergence Divergence

The moving average convergence divergence indicator, or MACD, combines both trend identification and timing into one tool. The MACD belongs to a group of technical indicators called oscillators because they tend to move back and forth from one side to the other over a period of time.

The MACD is built on the idea that when moving averages begin to diverge from each other, momentum is generally thought to be increasing, and a trend may be starting. Traditionally, the MACD takes two EMAs—the 12 and 26 period—subtracts the shorter from the longer, and plots it on a chart.  

Then a 9-period average of the MACD itself is plotted, thereby creating a signal line. When that signal line crosses above the indicator line, it means an upward trend may be starting, and when it crosses below, it may signal the start of a downtrend. The MACD can also be plotted as a histogram. When bars are above the zero line, it indicates an upward trend, and when the bars are below the zero line, it could mean a downtrend. In the chart in figure 3, the two-line and histogram MACD is plotted in the subchart below the price chart.

FIGURE 3: APPLYING THE MACD. The moving average convergence divergence (MACD) indicator is plotted in a subchart below the stock chart as two lines and a histogram. As the signal line (blue) crosses above and below the indicator line (yellow) and the histogram bars move above and below the zero line, you may be able to identify potential trend changes. Chart source: the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

The 12-26-9 configuration is the default setting in thinkorswim, but you can go in and adjust the inputs, depending on your trading preferences. Just select the indicator, then Edit study MACD. In the MACD Customizing window, change the input parameters and then select Apply.

3. Parabolic SAR

Another potential thinkorswim indicator for your trend-finding arsenal, especially for swing traders, is the Parabolic SAR.

The “SAR” in Parabolic SAR stands for “stop and reverse,” and the indicator is designed so that when a security is in an uptrend, the indicator is plotted below the price in the form of a dot (see figure 4). This dot is the theoretical “stop” in the stop and reverse, the point at which (if the price touches it) the trend may have changed. When this happens, the SAR is then automatically plotted above the price, indicating a downtrend is in effect. Some traders use the Parabolic SAR to help them determine where to place stop orders. 

FIGURE 4: USING PARABOLIC SAR TO IDENTIFY TRENDS. The Parabolic SAR, plotted as a yellow dot above or below the daily close, indicates trend direction. A series of dots below the price bars indicates an uptrend, whereas a series of dots above the price bars indicates a downtrend. When the price moves below or above these dots, it could indicate a change in trend direction. Chart source: the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

As you can see from figure 4, the longer the SAR is below (or above) the prevailing price, the stronger the trend may be. However, on short-term time frames, the Parabolic SAR may be more susceptible to false signals (what some traders call “whipsaws”). Like all trend-following thinkorswim indicators, the inputs for the Parabolic SAR can be customized and used with any time frame. 

These are just a few of the thinkorswim studies you can choose from when trying to identify and analyze trends in your trading and investing. They can be used as stand-alone indicators or in conjunction with others. But however you wish to use them, make sure you take the time to familiarize yourself with each to find the strategy that works best for you. 

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Key Takeaways

  • Three popular trend-following indicators are moving averages, moving average convergence divergence (MACD), and Parabolic SAR
  • Get to know trend-following indicators by experimenting with different ones

  • Trend-following indicators can be used on their own or combined with other indicators

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Sours: https://tickertape.tdameritrade.com/tools/thinkorswim-trend-indicators-technical-analysis-15565

SimpleMovingAvg

Description

The Simple Moving Average is calculated by summing the closing prices of the security for a period of time and then dividing this total by the number of time periods. Sometimes called an arithmetic moving average, the SMA is basically the average stock price over time. As a trend develops, the moving average will slope in the direction of the trend, showing the trend direction and some indication of its strength based on the slope steepness.

Another analysis technique that is often used with moving averages is looking for price breakouts: crossovers of the price plot with the moving average. Bullish breakouts are indicated every time the price crosses above the average. When the price falls below the average, a bearish breakout is recognized. By default, breakout signals are disabled; to enable them, set the parameter value to .

Note that since the simple moving average gives equal weight to each daily price, recent market volatility may appear smoothed out. Long-term moving averages tend to eliminate minor fluctuations showing only longer-term trends. Shorter-term moving averages may show shorter-term trends but tend to neglect the long-term ones.

Input Parameters

Parameter Description
The price used to calculate the average.
The number of bars used to calculate the average.
The displacement of the SMA study, in bars. Positive values signify backward displacement.
Controls visibility of breakout signals.

Plots

Plot Description
The Simple Moving Average (SMA) plot.
If enabled, displays an up arrow every time the price crosses above the simple moving average.

If enabled, displays a down arrow every time the price crosses below the simple moving average.

Example*

*For illustrative purposes only. Not a recommendation of a specific security or investment strategy.

Sours: https://tlc.thinkorswim.com/center/reference/Tech-Indicators/studies-library/R-S/SimpleMovingAvg
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Thinkorswim Moving Average

Thinkorswim Moving Average

How do I add an SMA line to thinkorswim?

| To set up a moving average survey on the thinkorswim platform, enter a ticker symbol and go to Charts> Studies> Add Survey> Moving Averages> Daily SMA.

What is the SMA line for this in stock?

Moving averageHow do you create your indicators?

Create your indicator:

  1. Finely chop the red cabbage on the cutting board.
  2. Put the chopped cabbage in a bowl.
  3. Bring the kettle to a boil and pour hot water into the bowl until the cabbage is covered.
  4. Mix gently and let it rest for five to ten minutes.
  5. Place the colander on the other large bowl and let the liquid drain.

Which programming language is thinkScript also?

Lots of reading and learning, will probably use C ++, Java or Python to start with, thanks again! There is no language to learn for TOS. It uses its own scripting language called Thinkscript and is not compatible with any programming language.

How can I edit thinkScript?

Access to the thinkScript® editor

  1. Above the chart, click Studies. Select Edit Studies …
  2. In the list of available studies, click Create. To create a strategy, do the same on the Strategies tab. To edit an existing study or strategy, click the scroll symbol in front of the title.

How do I add tags to ThinkorSwim?

How can I import thinkScript code into the ThinkorSwim platform How can I create a simple moving average?

A single moving average (SMA) is an arithmetic moving average that is calculated by adding the last closing price and then dividing by the number of periods in the calculation average.

How do you draw a 50 day moving average?

Conclusion

How do you determine moving averages in thinkorswim?

To set up a moving average study on the thinkorswim platform, enter a ticker symbol and go to Charts> Studies> Add Study> Moving Average> Daily SMA. Change the period (20, 50, etc.) via the settings window.

Which is better SMA or EMA?

The Simple Moving Average (SMA) is the average price of a stock over a specified period of time. The exponential moving average (EMA) gives more weight to current prices to better reflect new market data. The difference between the two is clear when comparing the long-term averages.

What is sma50?

The 50-day simple moving average, or SMA, is often represented and used by traders and market analysts as historical analysis of price movements shows that it is an effective trend indicator. It can also be used to put a later stage on an existing market position.

Which indicator is best for day trading?

Useful Indicators for Intraday Trading What is the Best Day Trading Strategy?

5 Day Trading Strategies

Which Moving Average is Better?

Here are 4 particularly important moving averages for swing traders:

How is the SMA calculated?

The Simple Moving Average (SMA) is calculated by adding the price of an instrument over multiple periods and then dividing the sum by the number of periods. The SMA is basically the average price for a given period, with the same price weighting for each period.

What moving averages do day traders use?

5813 Use in a long trade

How is the EMA calculated?

EMA Calculation

Does Moving Average Crossover Work?

Cross-transfer strategies have worked very well in recent years. They prevented their supporters from investing in stocks during the tech bubble and the financial crisis. However, most of these strategies have lagged behind the broader stock market since 2009.

How do you analyze simple moving averages?

How to interpret the simple moving average on a trading chart

What happens if the 50 day moving average crosses the 100 day moving average?

The most popular gold crosses that are often mentioned in the media are when the 50 day moving average crosses the 100 or 200 day moving average. This suggests that the long-term downtrend is coming to an end and that an uptrend may be underway.

What does a moving average show?

A moving average (MA) is an indicator often used in technical analysis that helps regulate price movement by filtering out the noise of random short-term price movements. The most common uses of moving averages are to identify the direction of the trend and determine support and resistance levels.

How do you trade moving averages?

Blur the main trend with two simple moving averages

How do you find the simple average?

The average of a series of numbers is simply the sum of the numbers divided by the total number of values ​​in the series. For example, suppose we want the average of 24, 55, 17, 87, and 100. Just find the sum of the numbers: 24 + 55 + 17 + 87 + 100 = 283 and divide by 5 to get 56.6 to get.

What does SMA mean in the company?

Account managed separately

Thinkorswim Moving Average

Sours: https://howtodiscuss.com/t/thinkorswim-moving-average/75957
Moving Averages Tutorial In Thinkorswim- Thinkorswim Tutorial

Keeping Your Trends Close with Moving Average Crossovers

Identifying entry and exit points is crucial for any trading strategy. A simple moving average crossover system can help.

By Michael Turvey June 20, 2019 5 min read

https://tickertapecdn.tdameritrade.com/assets/images/pages/md/Ride the wave: spotting price trends with simple moving averages

Key Takeaways

  • Markets often comprise short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term trends
  • A simple moving average (SMA) can help indicate the direction of a given trend
  • Using two simple moving averages can help you select entry and exit points

Whether you’re surfing the waves on Hawaii’s North Shore or the volatile markets on the trading screen, failing to catch the right wave at the right time can leave you vulnerable to a nasty wipeout. So before you jump in, paddle out for a moment and let’s take a closer look at the swells.

Surfers and traders share at least a few common traits (if you fall into both categories, we salute you). For either pursuit, recognizing and riding that big wave is crucial to your strategy. You have to know when to get in and when to get out; when to go big, and when to go home.

Markets are dynamic, just like the ocean. Prices are constantly moving, forming small and large waves which, in finance-speak, are called “trends.” Markets and trends are inseparable. Whether we’re talking about a blue-chip stock or a T-bone steak, prices don’t sit still. Over time, they change, sometimes moving faster than at other times.

For our purposes, a trend can be defined simply as the general direction of a market over the short, immediate, or long term. As in the ocean, markets have both tiny and huge waves, and some in between. A technical tool known as a simple moving average (SMA) crossover can help you identify the lion’s share of a trend.

Some stock moves are short-lived, while others last for weeks, months, or even years. If the trend is indeed your friend, to cite an ancient trading maxim, how can a SMA crossover system help? Start with three questions:

  1. Which direction might the market be trending (if at all)?
  2. Where might be a potential entry point for a trend trade?
  3. When might a trend be ending or reversing?

Getting Started

Consider these basic guiding principles:

  • Uptrend: If a stock price is above a simple moving average and that SMA is moving higher, you might be looking at an uptrend.
  • Downtrend: If the stock price is below the moving average and that MA is moving lower, you might be looking at a downtrend.

Caveat: These principles are intended to help you interpret the potential direction of a trend, not to definitively call its direction. If a stock price is above the SMA, and if the SMA itself is moving upward, then there may be a stronger likelihood that you’ve identified an uptrend. The reverse may be true for a downtrend. But bear in mind that trends can change, and other indicators can also be used to interpret trend direction. They may even conflict with one another from time to time.

Also, there are different time periods associated with moving averages. You might choose a 10-day, 50-day, or 200-day moving average. What’s the difference? The shorter the moving average, the shorter the trend it identifies, and vice versa (see figure 1).

FIGURE 1: HOW LONG IS YOUR TREND? Shorter-term moving averages such as the 10-day (blue line) tend to closely track a stock’s daily and weekly ups and downs. In contrast, the 50-day (orange) and 200-day (purple) SMAs offer a smoother, more gradual look at the longer-term trend. To set up a moving average study in the thinkorswim platform, type in a stock symbol and under Charts > Studies select Add Study > Moving Averages > Daily SMA. Edit the time period (20, 50, etc.) via the Customization window. Chart source: the thinkorswim® platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

What Is a Moving Average?

A moving average is a trend-following indicator that helps you determine whether the “average” price in a given time period is trending up or down. You can see the movement of a stock’s average price over time in relation to the actual stock price, which at times may trade above or below its moving average line.

How are moving averages calculated? Let’s take the 50-day simple moving average (SMA). To calculate the 50-day SMA, add up the stock’s closing price from the last 50 days and divide the total by 50. Each day, the average changes because the oldest day is subtracted, while the current day’s information is added.

Because the SMA is a lagging indicator, the crossover technique may not capture exact tops and bottoms. But it can help an investor identify the bulk of a trend.

What’s Your Time Horizon?

Match the appropriate moving average time period to your trading time horizon, whether that’s short, medium, or long term. For example:

  • Short-term trend: A short-term trader may use the 10-day moving average to monitor the short-term trend. If a stock price is above the 10-day SMA, and the SMA is moving higher, then the short-term trend may be up (the opposite is true for a downtrend).
  • Intermediate-term trend: If the stock is above the 50-day moving average, and the SMA is moving higher, then the intermediate-term trend is generally considered to be up.
  • Long-term trend: Finally, the “big dog” of moving averages is the 200-day. If a stock is trading above that level, and the SMA is moving higher, the long-term trend is considered up; generally, the 200-day is seen as a proxy for the long-term trend (and it’s the one you might see on a TV business report).

Using Two Moving Averages to Better Identify Trends

Once you’ve assessed your time horizon, answer the following questions.

1. Where is the trigger for entry?

To create your own moving average crossover system, the first step is to choose your time horizon. As an example, we’ll look at an intermediate-term approach, which could include 20-day and 50-day moving averages. When the shorter average (the 20-day in this case) crosses above the longer average, that often signals a stronger likelihood of an uptrend. Some investors will take this as a buy signal.

2. When is the trend over or reversing?

When the shorter moving average crosses below its longer counterpart, that may signal that an uptrend may be ending or perhaps even reversing to the downside. Some investors might take this as a signal to sell their positions.

Why use two moving averages? With just one, a buy signal might be triggered whenever a stock’s closing price moves above the moving average. This signal may or may not be valid. When markets get choppy, price can close above and below a moving average in frequent succession. This can leave you vulnerable to getting whipsawed. The moving average crossover technique can help you avoid false signals and whipsaw moves.

To see how a simple moving average crossover system can generate trigger points for potential entries and exits, see figure 2.

FIGURE 2: WHAT’S THE SIGNAL? A moving average crossover can generate potential buy or sell signals. Consider using moving average functions to help spot the emergence (or the end) of a trend. Chart source: the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

Look for Confirmation

Confirmation is a basic tenet of technical analysis. Generally, no indicator or chart pattern stands alone. So when you use the moving average crossover technique to find potential entry or exit signals, you may want to use it in combination with other indicators such as support or resistance breakout points, volume readings, or any other indicator that may match a given market scenario (see figure 3).

FIGURE 3: A MOVING AVERAGE CROSSOVER CONFIRMATION. The two purple lines signal a divergence between price, which is falling, and the Relative Strength Index (RSI), which is rising. This might signal a potential bottom. Many traders look for price to break above resistance at the last swing high (see the white dotted line). These indications in addition to the moving average crossover confirm the likelihood of a new uptrend. Chart source: the thinkorswim platform from TD Ameritrade. For illustrative purposes only. Past performance does not guarantee future results.

Ride the Waves

Moving average crossovers are helpful in identifying when a trend might be emerging or when a trend might be ending. The crossover system offers specific triggers for potential entry and exit points. These triggers should be confirmed with a chart pattern or resistance breakout along with supportive volume.

Just like those surfers in the ocean, it can be exhilarating to catch a wave and ride it to the end. Just be sure to pay attention to the exit points so you know when it might be time to jump off.

Michael Turvey
By Michael Turvey

Senior Strategist, Trading Education, TD Ameritrade Institutional

Key Takeaways

  • Markets often comprise short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term trends
  • A simple moving average (SMA) can help indicate the direction of a given trend
  • Using two simple moving averages can help you select entry and exit points

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Sours: https://tickertape.tdameritrade.com/trading/understanding-stock-indicators-moving-average-crossovers-17479

Moving thinkorswim average day 20

Why the 50-Day Simple Moving Average Is Popular Among Traders

The 50-day simple moving average (SMA) is commonly plotted on charts and utilized by traders and market analysts because historical analysis of price movements shows it to be an effective trend indicator.

Key Takeaways

  • The 50-day simple moving average (SMA) is used by traders as an effective trend indicator.
  • Along with the 100- and 200-day moving averages, the 50-day average is a key level of support or resistance used by traders.
  • The 50-day average is considered the most important because it's the first line of support in an uptrend or the first line of resistance in a downtrend.
  • If the price moves significantly below the 50-period moving average, it's commonly interpreted as a trend change to the downside.

The 50-, 100-, and 200-day moving averages are probably among the most commonly found lines drawn on any trader or analyst's charts. All three are considered major, or significant, moving averages and represent levels of support or resistance in a market.

Why the 50-Day Moving Average?

The 50-day moving average is the leading of the three averages and is, therefore, the first line of major moving average support in an uptrend or the first line of major moving average resistance in a downtrend.

As noted, the 50-day moving average is widely used because it works well. The more accurate a moving average is as a trend indicator, the more useful it is for traders and analysts. The ideal moving average shows a level that price will not likely violate on a mere temporary retracement, thus possibly giving a false market reversal signal. It can also be used to place a trailing stop on an existing market position.

Additionally, it is helpful if the moving average is a level that price will approach on retracements and can, therefore, be used to make additional market entries. Through trial and error using various moving averages, the 50-day moving average has served these purposes well.

In a sustained uptrend, the price generally remains above the 50-day moving average, and the 50-day moving average remains above the 100-day moving average. If the price moves significantly below the 50-period moving average, and especially if it closes below that level, it is commonly interpreted by analysts as signaling a possible trend change to the downside. The 50-day moving average crossing below and remaining below the 100-day moving average gives the same signal.

Long-term trend traders commonly use the 50-day SMA, whereas intraday stock or forex traders often employ a 50-day exponential moving average or EMA on a one-hour chart.

50-Day Average Downsides

The key downside to the 50-day moving average is that it uses historical data. There are times that the market tends to follow moving average support and resistance levels, but at other times the indicators get no respect.

The 50-day average can perform well during strong market conditions, but not-so-well during unpredictable or choppy markets. Some of this uncertainty can be mitigated by adjusting the time frame.

Sours: https://www.investopedia.com/ask/answers/012815/why-50-simple-moving-average-sma-so-common-traders-and-analysts.asp
100% on 2 Swing Trades - Using Moving Averages To Find Entries

To set up a moving average study in the thinkorswim platform, type in a stock symbol and under Charts > Studies select Add Study > Moving Averages > Daily SMA.


Click to see full answer.

Correspondingly, what is the SMA line in stocks?

Moving Average

Secondly, how do you make your own indicators? Making your indicator:

  1. Finely chop the red cabbage on the chopping board.
  2. Place the chopped cabbage in a bowl.
  3. Boil the kettle and pour the hot water in the bowl until it just covers the cabbage.
  4. Stir a little bit and then leave for five to ten minutes.
  5. Place the strainer over the second large bowl and pour off the liquid.

Just so, what programming language is thinkScript?

Have a lot to read and learn, probably will go for C++, java, or python for the start, thanks again! There is no languages to be learned for TOS. It uses its own proprietary scripting language called Thinkscript and is not compatible with any programming languages out there.

How do I edit thinkScript?

Access to thinkScript® Editor

  1. Click Studies above the chart. Choose Edit Studies…
  2. Click Create below the list of available studies. To create a strategy, do the same on the Strategies tab. To edit an existing study or strategy, click on the scroll icon before its title.
Sours: https://everythingwhat.com/how-do-you-add-a-sma-line-in-thinkorswim

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