Nhl playoff stats all time

Nhl playoff stats all time DEFAULT

NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs, Historical Data

Historical Stanley Cup Playoff data for 7-game series

"Closeout Games" are ones where that team had a chance to end the series with a win. Elimination games are ones where that team would lose the series with a loss.

The "Series Results When..." chart shows the distribution of series results given results so far. Across the top are the possible outcomes of the series, i.e. "W6"="Win in 6 games."

AllG1G2G3G4G5G6G7
Regular Games2330-1785.566458-269.630451-275.621360-367.495355-371.489374-230.619225-196.534107-77.582
Overtime Games413-413.50067-60.52876-66.53573-77.48765-76.46168-62.52341-50.45123-22.511
Closeout Games384-237.61835-18.660135-76.640107-66.618
Elimination Games350-343.50558-88.39767-48.583118-130.476
ScenarioW4W5W6W7Tot WL5L6L7Tot LNum Series
Any Series, Up 1-012417.114419.814720.28411.649968.6395.48912.210013.822831.4727
Any Series, Up 2-112924.515228.88816.736970.07113.58716.515830.0527
Any Series, Up 3-118356.18124.8329.829690.8309.2309.2326
Any Series, Up 3-223656.29622.933279.08821.08821.0420
Any Series, Up 3-012462.05427.0136.552.519698.042.042.0200
Any Series, Up 2-012431.910326.57820.1328.233786.6246.2287.25213.4389
Win Game 1, Series 1-012417.114419.814720.28411.649968.6395.48912.210013.822831.4727
   Home9019.711024.09019.75411.834475.1183.94810.54810.511424.9458
   Away3412.63412.65721.23011.215557.6217.84115.25219.311442.4269
Win Game 2, Series 1-13811.36519.37221.417551.94112.26920.55215.416248.1337
   Home2011.93017.94325.69355.4148.33923.22213.17544.6168
   Away1810.73520.72917.28248.52716.03017.83017.88751.5169
Win Game 2, Series 2-012431.910326.57820.1328.233786.6246.2287.25213.4389
   Home8931.48229.05720.1238.125188.7134.6196.73211.3283
   Away3533.02119.82119.898.58681.11110.498.52018.9106
Win Game 3, Series 2-17923.48725.86118.122767.44713.96318.711032.6337
   Home3219.45030.32313.910563.62414.53621.86036.4165
   Away4727.33721.53822.112270.92313.42715.75029.1172
Win Game 3, Series 3-012462.05427.0136.552.519698.042.042.0200
   Home3460.71425.058.923.65598.211.811.856
   Away9062.54027.885.632.114197.932.132.1144
Win Game 3, Series 1-22412.72412.74825.44925.96534.42714.314174.6189
   Home139.41611.52920.94129.55036.01913.711079.1139
   Away1122.0816.01938.0816.01530.0816.03162.050
Win Game 4, Series 3-112851.46827.32710.822389.62610.42610.4249
   Home4040.03636.01111.08787.01313.01313.0100
   Away8859.13221.51610.713691.3138.7138.7149
Win Game 4, Series 2-27125.66122.013247.78430.36122.014552.3277
   Home3722.83018.56741.45534.04024.79558.6162
   Away3429.63127.06556.52925.22118.35043.5115
Win Game 4, Series 1-345.345.35471.11317.156.67294.776
   Home35.235.24374.1813.846.95594.858
   Away15.615.61161.1527.815.61794.418
Win Game 5, Series 3-215556.06423.121979.15820.95820.9277
   Home9052.64828.113880.73319.33319.3171
   Away6561.31615.18176.42523.62523.6106
Win Game 5, Series 2-33021.03021.08156.63222.411379.0143
   Home1420.91420.94161.21217.95379.167
   Away1621.11621.14052.62026.36078.976
Win Game 6, Series 3-38847.88847.89652.29652.2184
   Home5042.45042.46857.66857.6118
   Away3857.63857.62842.42842.466

Series Records by Franchise

Game 7 Records by Franchise

Sours: https://www.hockey-reference.com/playoffs/playoff-history.cgi

Nhl playoff stats leaders

Dictionary

Frequently Asked Questions

What was the highest scoring NHL playoff game?

The highest-scoring playoff game in regulation occurred when the San Antonio Spurs defeated the Denver Nuggets with a score of 152–133 for a combined score of 285 points on April 26, 1983. In that game, the Spurs' George Gervin scored a game-high 42 points.

Who has the most points in a NHL playoff series?

RkNamePos
1Wayne GretzkyF
2Mario LemieuxF
3Wayne GretzkyF
4Wayne GretzkyF
46 more rows

Who scored the most goals in a NHL season?

The most goals scored in an NHL season is 92 by Wayne Gretzky (Canada) for the Edmonton Oilers in the 1981/82 season.

Who is the all - time leading scorer in the NHL?

Franchise Leaders: The all-time goal leader for all 31 NHL teams Gordie Howe, Detroit Red Wings: 786 goals. Mr. ... Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals: 706 goals. Ovechkin is one of three active players to lead their franchise in all-time goal-scoring. ... Mario Lemieux, Pittsburgh Penguins: 690 goals. ... Joe Sakic, Colorado Avalanche: 625 goals. ... Bobby Hull, Chicago Blackhawks: 604 goals. ... More items...

Sours: https://useenglishwords.com/results/nhl-playoff-stats-leaders/
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Franchise Leaders: The all-time playoff point leader for all 31 NHL teams

A quick refresher: Wayne Gretzky lapped the field with 382 career NHL playoff points. His old Oilers buddy Mark Messier sits second all-time with 295 playoff points, and only three other players in league history – former Oilers Jari Kurri and Glenn Anderson and roaming Penguin Jaromir Jagr – crested 200.

But let's get back to Gretzky. He did most of his post-season production with Edmonton in the 1980s, and nobody has more playoff points for the same franchise than Gretzky's 252 with the Oilers. But his work wasn't done – Gretzky is also the only player to lead two different franchises in playoff points, with 94 for Los Angeles. (Messier, it should be noted, is the only player to rank second in playoff scoring for two different franchises, Edmonton and the New York Rangers.)

Here’s a look at the playoff point leader for all 31 NHL franchises, plus each team’s all-time top five as well as the active leader.

(Also: NHL franchise all-time goal leaders, all-time point leaders and all-time goalie win leaders.)

1. Wayne Gretzky, Edmonton Oilers: 252 points
Only three players have ever recorded 200-plus playoff points for the same franchise – and they all starred for the Oilers in the '80s. Nobody has more playoff goals for the same franchise than Kurri's 92 with Edmonton. Active leader Leon Draisaitl ranks 36th on the Oilers' all-time list, while Connor McDavid (nine playoff points) sits outside the top 50. McDavid trails Grant Fuhr (as well as Dave Semenko and Marty McSorley) by three points, as the Oilers goalie collected 12 assists in 111 playoff games with Edmonton.
Rest of top five: Mark Messier (215), Jari Kurri (202), Glenn Anderson (183), Paul Coffey (103)
Active leader: Leon Draisaitl (16)

2. Joe Sakic, Colorado Avalanche: 188 points
In the non-Oilers category, nobody has more playoff points for the same franchise than Sakic's total of 188 for Colorado (177 points in 160 playoff games) and Quebec (11 points in 12 playoff games). Nathan MacKinnon ranks 18th on the Avs' all-time list.
Rest of top five: Peter Forsberg (159), Peter Stastny (81), Milan Hejduk (76), Sandis Ozolinsh (65)
Active leader: Nathan MacKinnon (29)

3. Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh Penguins: 186 points
Crosby will likely surpass Sakic on this all-time ranking during Pittsburgh's next playoff series – whenever that is – and it's plausible that he could one day catch Gretzky, which is an incredible possibility to even consider. Lemieux's 44-point playoff in 1991 is the second-highest in NHL history. Ron Francis ranks sixth on the Penguins' list with 100 playoff points, with Kris Letang seventh (80).
Rest of top five: Mario Lemieux (172), Evgeni Malkin (168), Jaromir Jagr (147), Kevin Stevens (106)
Active leader: Sidney Crosby (186)

4. Steve Yzerman, Detroit Red Wings: 185 points
It's kind of crazy to see Gordie Howe in fourth place on the Wings' list, but it's also a credit to the three players ahead of him. Pavel Datsyuk (113) and Alex Delvecchio (104) also had 100-plus playoff points with Detroit. Valterri Filppula, in 16th place with 57 playoff points, is the only active Wings player in team's top 50.
Rest of top five: Nicklas Lidstrom (183), Sergei Fedorov (163), Gordie Howe (158), Henrik Zetterberg (120)
Active leader: Valtteri Filppula (57)

5. Jean Beliveau, Montreal Canadiens: 176 points
The Canadiens have won 24 Stanley Cups and they've got the scoring power to prove it. Montreal is the only franchise to boast eight players with 100-plus playoff points, with Yvan Cournoyer (127), Maurice Richard (126) and Bernie Geoffrion (115) behind the top five. Seven Habs players have scored 50-plus playoff goals, and Henri Richard was on the cusp with 49. Active leader Brendan Gallagher is tied for 74th on Montreal's all-time list.
Rest of top five: Jacques Lemaire (139), Larry Robinson (134), Guy Lafleur (133), Henri Richard (129)
Active leader: Brendan Gallagher (21)

6. Bryan Trottier, New York Islanders: 170 points
Trottier, Denis Potvin and Mike Bossy are bunched together at the top, as it should be. Active leader Josh Bailey is tied for 30th on the Isles' list
Rest of top five: Denis Potvin (164), Mike Bossy (160), Clark Gillies (93), Bob Bourne (92)
Active leader: Josh Bailey (17)

7. Ray Bourque, Boston Bruins: 161 points
Bourque is the first of only three defensemen to lead their respective franchise in playoff scoring. Bobby Orr (97 playoff points) sits seventh on the Bruins' all-time list and Brad Marchand (83) has snuck into the top 10.
Rest of top five: Patrice Bergeron (103), David Krejci (103), Phil Esposito (102), Johnny Bucyk (100), Rick Middleton (100)
Active leader: Patrice Bergeron (103)

8. Stan Mikita, Chicago Blackhawks: 150 points
If the Blackhawks can return to contention in the next couple years, the door is open for Patrick Kane and perhaps even sixth-place Jonathan Toews (110 playoff points) to eventually overtake Mikita. Duncan Keith (81) ranks seventh among Chicago's all-time playoff scorers.
Rest of top five: Denis Savard (145), Bobby Hull (129), Patrick Kane (123), Steve Larmer (111)
Active leader: Patrick Kane (123)

9. Mike Modano, Dallas Stars: 145 points
The highest-scoring American-born player in NHL history – regular season and playoffs – has a 62-point lead in Stars post-season scoring, the widest margin among the league's 31 teams. Jamie Benn is tied for 21st on Dallas' list.
Rest of top five: Brian Bellows (83), Neal Broten (79), Bobby Smith (76), Sergei Zubov (72)
Active leader: Jamie Benn (30)

10. Alex Ovechkin, Washington Capitals: 126 points
Ovechkin and longtime center Nicklas Backstrom are the only two Capitals players to reach 100 playoff points. It's possible that Ovechkin's secondary center, Evgeny Kuznetsov, could one day join them. He's sixth on the Caps' all-time list with 57 playoff points.
Rest of top five: Nicklas Backstrom (106), Dale Hunter (72), John Carlson (60), Mike Ridley (60)
Active leader: Alex Ovechkin (126)

11. Patrik Elias, New Jersey Devils: 125 points
Like Modano, Elias is well ahead of the runner-up – he's 50 points up on Die Hard namesake John MacLean. Brian Rafalski had 60 post-season points with New Jersey to give the Devils three defensemen among their top six playoff scorers.
Rest of top five: John MacLean (75), Scott Gomez (65), Scott Niedermayer (64), Scott Stevens (62)
Active leader: Travis Zajac (28)

12. Ryan Getzlaf, Anaheim Ducks: 120 points
Only four active players (Crosby, Malkin, Ovechkin, Kane) have more playoff points than Getzlaf. He's more of a playmaker but also leads the Ducks in playoff goals with 37, narrowly ahead of Corey Perry (36) and Teemu Selanne (35). Francois Beauchemin is a bit of a surprise at No. 5 on the franchise list as the Ducks' highest-scoring playoff defenseman. He beat out sixth-place Scott Niedermayer (34 playoff points), seventh-place Cam Fowler (33) and eighth-place Chris Pronger (30). Paul Kariya, if you're wondering, ranks ninth on the franchise list (29).
Rest of top five: Corey Perry (89), Teemu Selanne (69), Jakob Silfverberg (41), Francois Beauchemin (39)
Active leader: Ryan Getzlaf (120)

13. Patrick Marleau, San Jose Sharks: 120 points
Marleau nudges out longtime linemate Joe Thornton, with Logan Couture lurking in third place. Active Sharks players Tomas Hertl (42 playoff points) and Marc-Edouard Vlasic (39) rank in the top 10.
Rest of top five: Joe Thornton (115), Logan Couture (101), Joe Pavelski (100), Brent Burns (59)
Active leader: Joe Thornton (115)

14. Bobby Clarke, Philadelphia Flyers: 119 points
It's the face of the franchise in first place, followed by three other 100-point producers from the Flyers' back-to-back Stanley Cup heyday in the mid-'70s. Claude Giroux ranks ninth with 65 playoff points, Eric Lindros is 11th with 57.
Rest of top five: Brian Propp (112), Bill Barber (108), Rick MacLeish (105), John LeClair (72)
Active leader: Claude Giroux (65)

15. Brett Hull, St. Louis Blues: 117 points
Hull, naturally, has nearly twice as many playoff goals as Blues runner-up Bernie Federko (67-35), with Vladimir Tarasenko (33) looking to move up from his third-place position. Jaden Schwartz, Tarasenko (49) and Alex Pietrangelo (45) rank sixth, seventh and eighth in Blues playoff points.
Rest of top five: Bernie Federko (101), Al MacInnis (58), Doug Gilmour (55), Chris Pronger (51)
Active leader: Jaden Schwartz (50)

16. Gilbert Perreault, Buffalo Sabres: 103 points
The Sabres have a young group and they haven't made the playoffs since 2011. As a result, Buffalo doesn't have a single active player who has recorded a playoff point with the team. Which is to say, Perreault's position atop the post-season scoring list is secure for the foreseeable future.
Rest of top five: Rick Martin (53), Craig Ramsay (48), Danny Gare (44), Rene Robert (39)
Active leader: No current Sabres players have recorded a playoff point with Buffalo

17. Al MacInnis, Calgary Flames: 102 points
MacInnis joins Boston's Bourque and (spoiler alert) the Rangers' Brian Leetch as the only three defensemen to lead their franchise in playoff scoring. The Flames are the only team to feature defensemen as their two highest playoff scorers, with MacInnis and Paul Reinhart (72). Joe Mullen, sixth on Calgary's list with 55 points, leads the Flames with 35 playoff goals. Active leader Sean Monahan is tied for 32nd among Calgary's all-time playoff scorers.
Rest of top five: Paul Reinhart (72), Theoren Fleury (62), Joel Otto (61), Joe Nieuwendyk (60)
Active leader: Sean Monahan (13)

18. Daniel Alfredsson, Ottawa Senators: 100 points
When it comes to Sens playoff production, Alfredsson has nearly twice as many points – and three times as many goals (51-17) – as Jason Spezza, the runner-up in both categories.
Rest of top five: Jason Spezza (52), Wade Redden (45), Erik Karlsson (37), Dany Heatley (35)
Active leader: Bobby Ryan (17)

19. Trevor Linden, Vancouver Canucks: 95 points
Linden put up 25 points during Vancouver's run to the 1994 Cup final. Alexander Edler sits 14th on the Canucks' all-time list, Bo Horvat (four playoff points) is next in a tie for 83rd.
Rest of top five: Henrik Sedin (78), Daniel Sedin (71), Pavel Bure (34), Geoff Courtnall (61)
Active leader: Alexander Edler (31)

20. Wayne Gretzky, Los Angeles Kings: 94 points
Speaking of prolific performances by a player on losing Cup finalist in the early '90s, Gretzky's 40-point output for the Kings in 1993 ranks fourth-most in a single post-season. (Gretzky also owns the 47-point NHL record as well as the third- and fifth-place totals of 43 and 38 points, all from his time in Edmonton.) Along with Anze Kopitar, active Kings in the all-time top 10 include Jeff Carter (53 playoff points), Drew Doughty (51) and Dustin Brown. Marcel Dionne (43) ranks 10th.
Rest of top five: Luc Robitaille (89), Anze Kopitar (66), Dave Taylor (59), Justin Williams (54)
Active leader: Anze Kopitar (66)

21. Brian Leetch, New York Rangers: 89 points
It seems a little odd that two of the three NHL franchises led by defensemen are Original Six teams, but here we are. Active leader Chris Kreider ranks 19th on the Rangers' list.
Rest of top five: Mark Messier (80), Rod Gilbert (67), Don Maloney (57), Walt Tkaczuk (51)
Active leader: Chris Kreider (37)

22. Doug Gilmour, Toronto Maple Leafs: 77 points
The franchise icons are well-represented in Toronto's top five, and in the next five as well: George Armstrong (60 playoff points), Ted Kennedy (60), Frank Mahovlich (60), Red Kelly (55) and Syl Apps (54). Borje Salming (49) is the Leafs' highest D-man at 12th. Active leader Mitch Marner is tied for 53rd on the Leafs' list.
Rest of top five: Mats Sundin (70), Dave Keon (67), Darryl Sittler (65), Wendel Clark (60)
Active leader: Mitch Marner (17)

23. Martin St-Louis, Tampa Bay Lightning: 68 points
It's St-Louis for now, but he could be shuffled significantly down the order in the not-too-distant future. Six of the Bolts' top nine all-time playoff scorers are currently with the team: top-fivers Nikita Kucherov, Steven Stamkos and Tyler Johnson, plus Victor Hedman (48 playoff points), Ondrej Palat (42) and Alex Killorn (41). And Brayden Point (17) is already 15th with a long, bright future ahead of him.
Rest of top five: Nikita Kucherov (61), Steven Stamkos (53), Vincent Lecavalier (52), Tyler Johnson (51)
Active leader: Nikita Kucherov (61)

24. Dale Hawerchuk, Arizona Coyotes: 49 points
Hawerchuk never played in Arizona, doing all his playoff damage for the original Winnipeg Jets. Oliver Ekman-Larsson is the active leader with four playoff points, tied for 46th on the Coyotes' all-time list.
Rest of top five: Thomas Steen (44), Keith Tkachuk (28), Shane Doan (28), Paul MacLean (26)
Active leader: Oliver Ekman-Larsson (4)

25. Filip Forsberg, Nashville Predators: 44 points
Known for their defensemen, the Predators feature three blueliners in their all-time top five – but not, notably, Shea Weber (sixth, 28 playoff points) or Ryan Suter (tied for 19th, 13 playoff points).
Rest of top five: Ryan Johansen (37), Roman Josi (32), Ryan Ellis (30), Mattias Ekholm (29)
Active leader: Filip Forsberg (44)

26. Eric Staal, Carolina Hurricanes: 43 points
Staal only made the playoffs twice in 11-plus seasons in Carolina, but he made his appearances count. He racked up 28 points in 25 games when the Canes won the Cup in 2006, and added 15 points in 18 games when they went to the conference final in '09.
Rest of top five: Ron Francis (39), Rod Brind'Amour (38), Kevin Dineen (31), Cory Stillman (26), Ray Whitney (26)
Active leader: Justin Williams (25)

27. Zach Parise, Minnesota Wild: 31 points
It's tight between Parise and Mikko Koivu, but Parise is signed for five more seasons while Koivu is a pending UFA. Defensemen Jared Spurgeon is seventh (17 playoff points) and Suter eighth (16) on the Wild's all-time list.
Rest of top five: Mikko Koivu (28), Jason Pominville (23), Marian Gaborik (22), Mikael Granlund (21)
Active leader: Zach Parise (31)

28. Reilly Smith, Vegas Golden Knights: 28 points
Despite just two post-season appearances to their credit – including a first-round ouster – the expansion Golden Knights already rank ahead of three teams when it comes to their leading playoff scorer. Mark Stone made Vegas' all-time top five with 12 points in just seven playoff games in 2019.
Rest of top five: Jonathan Marchessault (27), William Karlsson (20), Shea Theodore (18), Mark Stone (12), Alex Tuch (12)
Active leader: Reilly Smith (28)

29. Blake Wheeler, Winnipeg Jets: 27 points
Wheeler's right-hand man in Winnipeg, Mark Scheifele, leads the Jets in playoff goals with 16, Patrik Laine is next with eight.
Rest of top five: Mark Scheifele (26), Dustin Byfuglien (25), Patrik Laine (16), Kyle Connor (15), Paul Stastny (15)
Active leader: Blake Wheeler (27)

30. Cam Atkinson and Artemi Panarin (tie), Columbus Blue Jackets: 18 points
Rick Nash is tied with Riley Nash (and six others) for 18th in Blue Jackets all-time playoff scoring with three points.
Rest of top five: Seth Jones (16), Boone Jenner (14), Matt Calvert (10), Matt Duchene (10), Nick Foligno (10), Zachary Werenski (10)
Active leader: Cam Atkinson (18)

31. Ray Sheppard, Florida Panthers: 18 points
The Panthers' unlikely run to the 1996 Cup final as a third-year franchise was a great story. The fact that the '96 team continues to dominate the Panthers' all-time playoff scoring list is less impressive.
Rest of top five: Dave Lowry (17), Stu Barnes (16), Scott Mellanby (12), Rob Niedermayer (12), Robert Svehla (12)
Active leader: (tie) Aleksander Barkov and Jonathan Huberdeau (3)

Sam McCaig is a freelance writer and editor who has covered hockey and the NHL for more than 25 years.

Sours: /hockey/
Most Electrifying Playoff Goals from Each NHL Team this Decade (2010-2019)

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NHL Playoffs: 25 Most Dangerous Scorers in Stanley Cup Playoff History

0 of 25

    NEW YORK - MAY 07:  Mark Messier on the 15th floor of the NHL offices  during his visit to NHL headquarters and the NHL Store Powered by Reebok on May 7, 2008 in New York City.  (Photo by Michael Cohen/Getty Images for the NHL)*** Local Caption *** Mark M
    Michael Cohen/Getty Images

    Anytime you make an "all-time" list of anything sports related, you better have thick skin as a writer.  Comparing players from different generations remains an elusive endeavor and a daunting task. 

    How you handicap modern day changes such as nutrition, training, health care, and equipment technology?  What about the infusion of world talent in the NHL game?  How much weight is given to coaching styles and rule changes?

    There is no correct answer for any of these questions, but the best one can do is evaluate how dominant certain players were in their era and slot them in the master list accordingly.

    In this list we have the top 25 most dangerous scorers in playoff history.  The criteria used for this list was pretty broad to allow the inclusion of a variety of different players.  Some posed a threat with their dynamic physical ability.  Others slipped in based on pure production.  Moreover, a few made it in based on their hockey sense and uncanny ability to drive opponents crazy.

    However, the one common thread that links them all is that opposing goalies always accounted for their whereabouts on the ice at all times.  If they didn't, the paid the price.

    Without further ado, I present the best of the best.

1 of 25

    I'm not sure anyone reading this has ever seen Newsy Lalonde play a game, but there's something to be said for his stats.  He was such a lethal threat on the ice in 1919 that he netted an amazing 17 goals in 10 games.  In fact, he only had one assist in that run which just proves he was all about lighting the lamp.

    The Stanley Cup was cancelled that year due to the flu pandemic and Lalonde was one of the players to come down with the influenza bug.

    He won't be on any highlight shows anytime soon, but Newsy Lalonde, we still salute you.

    Tidbit: Known as the original "flying frenchman", he gained his Newsy nickname from working in a newspaper plant at the time.

2 of 25

    PITTSBURGH, PA - DECEMBER 31:  Paul Coffey #77 of the Pittsburgh Penguins skates against the Washington Capitals during the 2011 NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game on December 31, 2010 at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Get
    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

    I couldn't compile an entire list without including at least one defensemen.  With all due respect to players such as Niklas Lidstrom, Chris Chelios, Bobby Orr, and Denis Potvin, Paul Coffey remains the prototypical offensive defenseman. 

    In his long and illustrious career, he found the back of the net 59 times.  That is more than a lot of very good forwards to play in this league.  That list included guys like Guy Lafleur, Cam Neely, Luc Robitaille, and Stan Makita.  Furthermore, when he retired he was fifth in all-time playoff scoring with 196 points.

    Tidbit: Played for six different teams in his final six seasons.

3 of 25

    19 Jan 1996:  Wielding a double bladed stick, Gordie Howe #9 of the NHL Heroes checks Phil Esposito #7 of the Boston Bruins Heroes from behind during the second period of the NHL Heroes of Hockey game played at the Fleet Center in Boston, Massachusetts. M
    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    When it comes to playoff scoring leaders, not many have had as much success as Phil Esposito.  He led all scorers in three different seasons on his way to multiple Stanley Cup wins.  This was quite the feat considering some of the names in his era. 

    Tidbit: Continues to coach hockey to this day...albeit for the fire department on the hit series "Rescue Me".

4 of 25

    NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 20:  Alex Ovechkin #8 of the Washington Capitals follows through on a shot attempt against the New York Rangers in Game Four of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals during the 2011 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs at Madison Square Garden on
    Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

    Much like Pavel Bure, Alexander Ovechkin makes this list as an "exception" of sorts.  He doesn't have the playoff success or stats of others, but he is a game-changer each and every time he steps over the boards for a shift. 

    He only has 20 playoff goals to his name, but that has come in a minuscule 28 game sample size.  That isn't exactly production that opposing goalies take lightly.  Whether it is a highlight reel end-to-end rush or a one-timer on the power play, this guy creates many sleepless nights for goalies.

    Tidbit: Was named as an ambassador for the 2014 Sochi Olympics games based on the assumption that the NHL will be there.  Oops?

5 of 25

    VANCOUVER, BC - FEBRUARY 21:  Jaromir Jagr of Czech Republic in action during the ice hockey men's preliminary game between against Russia on day 10 of the Vancouver 2010 Winter Olympics at Canada Hockey Place on February 21, 2010 in Vancouver, Canada.  (
    Alex Livesey/Getty Images

    Jaromir Jagr has one of the oddest postseason reputations in the history of the game.  Alongside Mario, he was a dynamite force in the playoffs.  One look at his numbers and you'd think he was a slam-dunk prime-time player. 

    Yet, once he was asked to carry a team on his own, he got engulfed in the checking and couldn't elevate his game to the next level.  Now whether that is fair or not is still up for debate because he did play in the dead-puck era. 

    Also, it usually took a collective effort to shut him down.  It wasn't as easy as putting a shadow player on him and moving on with the game plan.  So to his credit, he was one of the more dangerous players on the ice, whether he produced or not.

    Tidbit: Began the fan salute at Madison Square Garden, now seen throughout the league.

6 of 25

    CHICAGO, IL - JANUARY 09: Former player Bobby Hull of the Chicago Blackhawks is introduced to the crowd during a Heritage Night to honor the 1961 Stanley Cup Championship team before a game against the New York Islanders at the United Center on January 9,
    Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

    The first of two Hull's on this list is the elder statesman Bobby Hull.  A Chicago Blackhawks legend and one of the best left wingers to ever play the game, he led all scorers in the playoffs in the 1965 season.  He is still in the top 25 in all-time playoff scoring, but he did it in much fewer games than the names around him.

    Long before there was a hardest shot contest at the All-Star game, rumors had it that he was once clocked at 118 mph.  I'm not about to question the scientific validity of that, but needless to say goalies far and wide feared his shot like the plague.  

    Tidbit: Became the third NHL player to be on the cover of Time magazine.

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    MONTREAL- DECEMBER 4:  Former Montreal Canadien Yvan Cournoyer skates during the Centennial Celebration ceremonies prior to the NHL game between the Montreal Canadiens and Boston Bruins on December 4, 2009 at the Bell Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
    Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images

    Back in the era of great nicknames, Yvan Cournoyer was dubbed as the "roadrunner" for his small size and lightning speed.  And as you all know, speed kills.  In 1973 he engraved his name in hockey history as he burned goalies for 15 of his 64 playoff goals. When he finally retired, he had 10 rings to his name, second only behind Henri Richard.  

    Tidbit: Had to wait three seasons before he saw a regular shift because coach Toe Blake considered him a defensive liability. 

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    16 Feb 1998:  Pavel Bure of Russia carries the puck against the Czech Republic at the Big Hat Arena during the 1998 Winter Olympic Games in Nagano, Japan.  \ Mandatory Credit: Doug Pensinger /Allsport
    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Pavel Bure might not have the career numbers that other players on this list have, but make no mistake about it—he was one of the most dangerous players on the ice in playoff history.   With 35 goals in 64 games, there is no denying that he produced when the situation called for it. 

    On Vancouver's historic cup run in 1994 Bure led the way with 16 goals in 24 games.  Many of those were big goals in big situations and he did it with dramatic flair.  It's a shame that his career was cut short due to injuries and bad circumstances, but for those of us who were lucky enough to see him in his prime, there weren't many better.

    Tidbit: Off-ice highlights include ties to the Russian mafia and a relationship with Anna Kournikova.

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    PITTSBURGH, PA - JANUARY 05:  Sidney Crosby #87 of the Pittsburgh Penguins skates during warmups prior to taking on the Tampa Bay Lightning on January 5, 2011 at Consol Energy Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/Getty Images)
    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

    There aren't many modern day players on this list (and with good reason) but it would be silly to leave off a player like Sidney Crosby.  It's quite remarkable what he's accomplished in this league in such a short period of time, but with a cup ring on his resume it's safe to say that monikers like "choker" or "can't win the big one" aren't going to be looming over his head any longer.

    Crosby followed up a great cup run with an even greater cup win the year after and has already cemented himself as one of the all-time playoff performers.  He's only played in 62 career playoff games, but has 30 goals to his name and it won't be long until his name goes shooting up the charts. 

    Tidbit: Youngest player to lead the NHL playoffs in scoring.

10 of 25

    COLUMBUS, OH - FEBRUARY 11:  Peter Forsberg #21 of the Colorado Avalanche skates up ice during the third period against the Columbus Blue Jackets on February 11, 2011 at Nationwide Arena in Columbus, Ohio. Columbus defeated Colorado 3-1. (Photo by John Gr
    John Grieshop/Getty Images

    It is a little strange to be writing about Peter Forsberg in the past tense after his latest comeback was just a few short months ago, but most people remember him for his glory years in Colorado.  Blessed with one of the best overall games in hockey history, Forsberg completely dominated the postseason every time he was on the ice.

    With his rare combination of touch, physical play, and vision, Forsberg was a threat to score in any situation of the game.  He led the playoffs in scoring twice and finished his career with 64 playoff goals.

    Tidbit: Is reportedly looking into bionic feet to make another comeback next season.

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    MONTREAL- DECEMBER 4:  Former Montreal Canadien Guy Lafleur speaks to fans during the Centennial Celebration ceremonies prior to the NHL game between the Montreal Canadiens and Boston Bruins on December 4, 2009 at the Bell Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Cana
    Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images

    Among all the great Montreal Canadiens players on this list, Guy Lafleur is perhaps the most dangerous of them all.  For three consecutive seasons, "The Flower" dominated postseason play.  He led all goal scorers those seasons and racked up 58 goals in his playoff career.  He might have had a controversial career off the ice, but in the time he was on it—very few players did it better than him.

    Tidbit: Drafted by the Minnesota North Stars in 1991 even though he was already retired.

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    VANCOUVER, CANADA - OCTOBER 28:  Partial Owner of the Vancouver Giants Gordie Howe, aka 'Mr. Hockey, poses for a portrait during his visit for his annual inspection of the Vancouver Giants prior to their WHL game against the Everett Silvertips on October
    Chris Relke/Getty Images

    What can I say about "Mr. Hockey" that hasn't been said before?  He led the playoffs in scoring three times and sits at the 17 spot in all-time playoff goal scoring.  Say what you want about his numbers, this was one of the early players to define the term "dangerous scorer".  This had as much to do with his style of play as it did his scoring prowess.  You didn't know if he would punch, elbow, or hit you, but one thing was certain—he was going to bring the pain each and every game.

    Tidbit: Despite having his No. 9 retired in three different teams, he wore No. 17 in his rookie season.

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    MONTREAL- DECEMBER 4:  Former Monreal Canadien Claude Lemieux skates during the Centennial Celebration ceremonies prior to the NHL game between the Montreal Canadiens and Boston Bruins on December 4, 2009 at the Bell Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada.  T
    Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images

    Known as the "other" Lemieux, Claude was a polarizing player for the entire second half of his playing career after his infamous hit from behind on Kris Draper.  Unfortunately, this incident tainted and clouded just how great he was on the ice.  If the hit happened a fraction of a second earlier/later people would be honoring Claude Lemieux in a much different light.

    And they would have good reason to.  Only three players played in more playoff games than him and only two others have more game-winning goals.  It didn't seem to matter what the situation was, Claude was a dangerous threat at any point in the game.  He quickly became one of the most dangerous players to face in the postseason and his knack for clutch goals devastated net-minders. This four-time cup and Conne Smythe Trophy winner ranks up there with the best of them.

    Tidbit: Was once accused of cannibalism after taking a bite of Jim Peplinski's finger.

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    MONTREAL- APRIL 19:  A photo of the banner commemorating the retired jersey of Jean Beliveau hanging in the Bell Centre prior to Game Three of the Eastern Conference Quarterfinals between the Washington Capitals and Montreal Canadiens during the 2010 NHL
    Richard Wolowicz/Getty Images

    Many Montreal Canadiens remain legends in their own right and some of those teams seemed unfairly stacked with talent, but this shouldn't take away from some of the individual feats by their players.

    Case in point is Jean Beliveau.  He not only led the NHL in goals in the 1956 playoff run, but he is still in the top 10 for goals scored in the postseason alongside Maurice Richard with 79.

    Ranked seventh on the list of top 100 players in NHL history by the Hockey News, Beliveau's continued to be an active member of the NHL community long after his playing days.  

    Tidbit: He threatened to leave the Hall of Fame if Alan Eagleson wasn't removed and took a controversial stance against the players during the 2005 lockout.

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    WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 01:  Former Washington Capital Dino Ciccarelli shakes hands with Alex Ovechkin #8 of the Washington Capitals before the game against the Montreal Canadiens at the Verizon Center on February 1, 2011 in Washington, DC.  (Photo by G
    Greg Fiume/Getty Images

    Is any all-time playoff list complete without Dino Ciccarelli's name?  If someone made an all-time underrated player list, it's very likely that his name would be No. 1 or 2.  The most likely reason for this was the fact that he got the vast majority of his goals in front of the net. 

    He played in a time where the front of the net was a free-for-all in terms of abuse.  Cross-checks to the back and head were permitted in this area along with tripping, slew-footing, and slashing.  Despite it all, Ciccarelli's toughness and competitiveness never wavered. 

    He finished with the fourth most hat-tricks in the playoffs and the third most power-play goals.  One could even argue that he was the most dangerous player on the ice.  No one did his job better than him and he came to be known as the poster-child of dirty goals.  Luckily for him and the Capitals, they all counted the same on the score sheet.

    Tidbit: One of the best players to have never won a cup.

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    DENVER - OCTOBER 01:  Joe Sakic shakes the hand of Scott Hannan as he greets all the players of the Colorado Avalanche in the locker room on the night when Sakic's jersey was retired at the Pepsi Center on October 1, 2009 in Denver, Colorado.  (Photo by D
    Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

    Come playoff time, not many players electrified the television screen as much as Joe Sakic did.  He was the captain of some of the most feared lineups to ever take the ice.  In both Avalanche cup runs, Sakic led the team in goal scoring.  If it wasn't for Patrick Roy's incredible heroics in 1996, Joe Sakic would have been the runaway winner of the Conne Smythe Trophy.  

    He owns the record for the most game-winning goals in the playoffs and tied for fourth all time in game-winners.  That is pretty elite company when you start considering who else is on that list.  Sakic finished up his career with 84 career postseason goals and sits seventh on the all-time list.

    Tidbit: Had a street named after him in his hometown—"Joe Sakic Way".

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    EDMONTON, CANADA - NOVEMBER 22:  Glenn Anderson #9 of the Edmonton Oilers skates after the play during the Molson Canadien Heritage Classic against the Montreal Canadiens on November 22, 2003 at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Canada. The Oilers defeate
    Dave Sandford/Getty Images

    Wayne Gretzky overshadowed a lot of Oilers during his time there.  It's always debatable whether or not Hall of Famers like Jari Kurri, Mark Messier, and others got the true recognition they deserved, but one name that is truly undermined is Glenn Anderson.

    He never led the playoffs in scoring, but he finished his career with 93 goals—good enough for fifth all-time.  Yet, for a variety of reasons he's never talked about on the same level as the names around him.  How many people know that he is third all-time in playoff overtime goals and tied for sixth all-time for game-winners?  

    Tidbit: His peers definitely recognized his talents.  He had one of the largest alumni turnouts for his jersey retirement.

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    TORONTO - NOVEMBER 7:  Cam Neely, the newest inductee into the Hockey Hall of Fame, at his induction photo opportunity on November 7, 2005 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.  (Photo by Bruce Bennett/Getty Images)
    Bruce Bennett/Getty Images

    Was there a more difficult player to contain in the playoffs than Cam Neely?  Mr. Bruin exemplifies what playoff hockey is all about and it's too bad we didn't get to see him in the league longer.  He only got the chance to play in 93 games, but before he was ready to retire he managed to score 57 goals.  

    A large number of those came against the Montreal Canadiens.  Patrick Roy went on the record after his career to say that Neely was the most dangerous scorer he ever faced.  That's high praise coming from the greatest goaltender in history.  Enough said?

    Tidbit: Makes regular appearances with Phil Esposito on "Rescue Me".

19 of 25

    TORONTO - JANUARY 1:  The Maurice Richard Trophy is presented yearly to the Top Goal Scorer in the National Hockey League as pictured on January 01, 2001.  (Photo by Silva Pecota /Getty Images/NHLI)
    Silvia Pecota/Getty Images

    When you name a scoring trophy after you, you can be certain it was for a good reason.  Maurice Richard led the Stanley Cup Playoffs in goals twice—once in 1947 and again in 1951.  He also remains in the top 10 of playoff goal scoring in NHL history with 82.

    Tidbit: The "rocket" continues to be known as the most prolific scorer of his time and his lethal instincts are well-known to most fans, but did you know he tried to join the military three times?  Luckily for the hockey world, broken bones in junior hockey never healed properly so he was denied each time.

20 of 25

    ST. LOUIS, MO - DECEMBER 5:  Former St. Louis Blues player Brett Hull and his father Bobby watch Brett's jersey number being raised to the rafters during his jersey retirement ceremony at the Scottrade Center December 5, 2006 in St. Louis, Missouri.  (Pho
    Dilip Vishwanat/Getty Images

    Calgary Flames fans wince every time they see a story about Brett Hull.  OK so they did get Joe Nieuwendyk in return, but Brett Hull remains one of the purest snipers the NHL has ever seen.  If you were an opposing goaltender, the number one priority you had was knowing exactly where Hull was at all times.  If Hull had a split second advantage, the puck was already in the back of the net. 

    Not many players knew how to evade traffic and get open as well as Hull.  The only thing better than his hockey sense was his release.  With 104 career playoff goals, Hull sits fourth on the list only behind Gretzky, Messier, and Kurri.  Not bad at all.

    Tidbit: Decided to play for the US National Team after being passed over by Team Canada.

21 of 25

    UNIONDALE, NY - MARCH 02:  Former New York Islanders legend Mike Bossy waves to the crowd before the game against the Florida Panthers at the Nassau Coliseum March 2, 2008 in Uniondale, New York. The Islanders are celebrating the 17 men that were part of
    Jim McIsaac/Getty Images

    Simply put, Mike Bossy was one of the most feared snipers in NHL history.  They can change the training regimen, nutrition, equipment, and the rules all they want, not many players are going to touch the success that Mike Bossy achieved. 

    Sometimes, one needs to talk about the intangibles to extrapolate the greatness of a player.  With Bossy, the numbers tell the story.  Sitting at sixth in league history, he has 85 goals in 128 games.  Do some quick math to find out what his goals-per-game average was—it's mind-blowing.

    Tidbit: Tried to get a job with the Montreal Canadiens organization after his playing days as a consultant, but was turned down multiple times.

22 of 25

    EDMONTON, CANADA - NOVEMBER 22:  Forward Jari Kurri #17 of the Edmonton Oilers acknowledges the fans as he skates into the rink to take on the Montreal Canadiens during the Molson Canadien Heritage Classic on November 22, 2003 at Commonwealth Stadium in E
    Dave Sandford/Getty Images

    Everyone knows Jari Kurri was the prolific wing-man on those great Oilers teams, but the truth is, he was a flat-out playoff stud regardless of who was around him.  His 103 career playoff goals ranks third all-time and he put up another 10 in 22 games after Wayne Gretzky was gone.  

    One the 1985 postseason he had an amazing four hat-tricks and a historic 19 goals in 18 games.  No one has ever come close to repeating his hat-trick extraordinaire performance since that season and it could be quite some time before we see it again.

    Tidbit: Married Miss Finland.

23 of 25

    NEW YORK - MAY 07:  Mark Messier on the 15th floor of the NHL offices  during his visit to NHL headquarters and the NHL Store Powered by Reebok on May 7, 2008 in New York City.  (Photo by Michael Cohen/Getty Images for the NHL)*** Local Caption *** Mark M
    Michael Cohen/Getty Images

    It's never easy following in the footsteps of greatness, but that's exactly what Mark Messier did when Wayne Gretzky was packaged up and shipped first class to Los Angeles.  Some thought that would be the end of the Oilers, but instead it was a chance for Messier to shine.  In 1990, he became the undisputed leader of Edmonton and helped lead the way to a cup. 

    A few short years later, he proved that run was no fluke and did it again with the New York Rangers.  When all was said and done, he completed his career second to only to the "Great One".  The two closest active players that threaten his 109 career playoff goals are Mike Modano and Mark Recchi.  Let's just say that his place in hockey history is safe for now.

    Tidbit: Only professional athlete to captain two different championship teams

24 of 25

    PITTSBURGH, PA - DECEMBER 31:  Mario Lemieux #66 of the Pittsburgh Penguins skates against the Washington Capitals during the 2011 NHL Winter Classic Alumni Game on December 31, 2010 at Heinz Field in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.  (Photo by Justin K. Aller/G
    Justin K. Aller/Getty Images

    I was very tempted to put Mario Lemieux number one on this list.  Many hockey people make the case that he was indeed more talented that Wayne Gretzky, but due to injuries and organizational circumstances, was never in a position to put up the kind of numbers or win the number of championships that the Great One did.

    However, there is a case to be made for longevity, and Lemieux just didn't have it.  Having said that, it shouldn't take away from what he was able to accomplish.  He led all goal scorers in both cup runs and finished with 76 goals in 107 games.

    Let me repeat that—76 goals in 107 games!  That kinda production is just unheard of, especially when opposing teams did everything in their power to shut him down. 

    Tidbit: Is not the highest scoring Lemieux on the list.  That honor goes to Claude Lemieux with 80 (albeit in 127 more games).

25 of 25

    NEW YORK, NY - APRIL 18:  Wayne Gretzky #99 of the New York Rangers acknowledges the crowd during introductions before playing in his final career game against the Pittsburgh Penguins at the Madison Square Garden on April 18, 1999 in New York City, New Yo
    Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

    Is it boring to have Wayne Gretzky at the top of the list?  Maybe so, but it's simply impossible to deny the facts.  Hey, he was called the "Great One" for a reason, right?  And no one was greater in the history of this sport than Gretzky.  He had the most goals in six different postseasons and remains the undisputed goal leader in playoff history with an unattainable 122. 

    Legends are made in the playoffs.  Many good players can't handle this pressure once the prime-time lights turn on.  They wither in the lime-light and become forgotten souls in the hockey world. 

    Not Gretzky.  He took his game to another level and single-handedly put hockey on the proverbial map with his championship runs.  There has never been a more feared player on the ice and it's questionable if there will ever be another like him.  Mr. Hollywood is easily the most dangerous scorer in playoff history. 

    Tidbit: Continues to be one of the most endorsed athletes in all of sports, despite the fact that he's been retired forever.

Sours: https://bleacherreport.com/articles/675337-nhl-playoffs-25-most-dangerous-scorers-in-stanley-cup-playoff-history
Rangers @ Senators 10/23/2021 - NHL Highlights
All-Time Playoff Points Leaders
Since 1918
Records found
(120 or more points)
#Player Team(s) Pts GP G A Yrs
 1 Wayne GretzkyEdm., L.A., St.L., NYR38220812226016
 2 Mark MessierEdm., NYR, Van.29523610918617
 3 Jari KurriEdm., L.A., NYR, Ana., Col.23320010612715
 4 Glenn AndersonEdm., Tor., NYR, St.L.2142259312115
 5 Jaromir Jagr *Pit., Wsh., NYR, Phi., Dal., Bos., N.J., Fla.2012087812318
 6 Paul CoffeyEdm., Pit., L.A., Det., Hfd., Phi., Chi., Car., Bos.1961945913716
 7 Brett HullCgy., St.L., Dal., Det., Phx.1902021038719
 8 Joe SakicQue., Col.1881728410413
 9 Doug GilmourSt.L., Cgy., Tor., N.J., Chi., Buf., Mtl.1881826012817
 10 Steve YzermanDetroit1851967011520
 11 Bryan TrottierNYI, Pit.1842217111317
 12 Nicklas LidstromDetroit1832635412919
 13 Raymond BourqueBos., Col.1802144113921
 14 Jean BeliveauMontreal176162799717
 15 Sergei FedorovDet., Ana., CBJ, Wsh.1761835212415
 16 Denis SavardChi., Mtl., T.B.1751696610916
 17 Mario LemieuxPittsburgh17210776968
 18 Peter ForsbergQue., Col., Phi., Nsh.1711516410713
 19 Denis PotvinNY Islanders1641855610814
 20 Sidney Crosby *Pittsburgh164148571079
 21 Mike BossyNY Islanders160129867610
 22 Gordie HoweDet., Hfd.160157689220
 23 Al MacInnisCgy., St.L.1601773912119
 24 Bobby SmithMin., Mtl.160184649613
 25 Claude LemieuxMtl., N.J., Col., Phx., Dal., S.J.158234807818
 26 Evgeni Malkin *Pittsburgh15714958999
 27 Adam OatesDet., St.L., Bos., Wsh., Phi., Ana., Edm.1561634211415
 28 Larry MurphyL.A., Wsh., Min., Pit., Tor., Det.1522153711520
 29 Stan MikitaChicago150155599118
 30 Marian Hossa *Ott., Atl., Pit., Det., Chi.149205529716
 31 Brian ProppPhi., Bos., Min., Hfd.148160648413
 32 Mark RecchiPit., Phi., Mtl., Car., Atl., T.B., Bos.147189618614
 33 Mike ModanoMin., Dal.145174588715
 34 Larry RobinsonMtl., L.A.1442272811620
 35 Chris CheliosMtl., Chi., Det., Atl.1442663111324
 36 Ron FrancisHfd., Pit., Car., Tor.143171469717
 37 Jacques LemaireMontreal139145617811
 38 Phil EspositoChi., Bos., NYR137130617615
 39 Brendan ShanahanN.J., St.L., Hfd., Det., NYR134184607419
 40 Guy LafleurMtl., NYR, Que.134128587614
 41 Esa TikkanenEdm., NYR, St.L., N.J., Van., Fla., Wsh.132186726013
 42 Steve LarmerChi., NYR131140567513
 43 Henri RichardMontreal129180498018
 44 Bobby HullChi., Wpg., Hfd.129119626714
 45 Luc RobitailleL.A., Pit., NYR, Det.127159586915
 46 Yvan CournoyerMontreal127147646312
 47 Maurice RichardMontreal126133824415
 48 Patrick EliasNew Jersey125162458013
 49 Brad ParkNYR, Bos., Det.125161359017
 50 Patrick Kane *Chicago12312750738
 
 
Sours: http://www.hockeycentral.co.uk/stanleycup/stan-atpl.php

Now discussing:

List of NHL records (individual)

Wikimedia list article

This is a list of individual records recognized by the National Hockey League through the end of the 2019–20 NHL season.

Seasons[edit]

Games[edit]

  • Most games: Patrick Marleau, 1,779
  • Most games, including playoffs: Mark Messier, 1,992
  • Most playoff games: Chris Chelios, 266
  • Most games played in a single NHL season, not including playoffs: Jimmy Carson (1992–93) and Bob Kudelski (1993–94), 86
  • Most consecutive games: Doug Jarvis (October 8, 1975 – October 10, 1987), 964
  • Most consecutive games by a defenseman: Jay Bouwmeester, 737
  • Oldest player to play in an NHL game: Gordie Howe, 52 years, 11 days
  • Most games coached in the Stanley Cup Final: Dick Irvin[a], 77
  • Most games played in the Stanley Cup Final: Red Kelly[b] and Henri Richard[c], 65
  • Most games won by a coach in the Stanley Cup Final: Scotty Bowman[d], 36
  • Most games coached by the first coach of an NHL expansion franchise: Barry Trotz (Nashville Predators), 1,196

Stanley Cup[edit]

NHL Awards[edit]

  • Most Hart Memorial Trophies: Wayne Gretzky, 9[2]
    • Most consecutive Hart Memorial Trophies: Wayne Gretzky, 8
  • Most Ted Lindsay Awards: Wayne Gretzky, 5[3]
    • Most consecutive Ted Lindsay Awards: Wayne Gretzky, 4
  • Most Conn Smythe Trophies: Patrick Roy, 3[4]
  • Most James Norris Trophies: Bobby Orr, 8[5]
    • Most consecutive James Norris Trophies: Bobby Orr, 8
  • Most Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophies: Alexander Ovechkin, 9[6]
    • Most consecutive Maurice "Rocket" Richard Trophies: Alexander Ovechkin, 4
  • Most Art Ross Trophies: Wayne Gretzky, 10[7]
    • Most consecutive Art Ross Trophies: Wayne Gretzky, 7
  • Most Frank J. Selke Trophies: Bob Gainey and Patrice Bergeron, 4[8]
    • Most consecutive Frank J. Selke Trophies: Bob Gainey, 4
  • Most Lady Byng Trophies: Frank Boucher, 7[9]
    • Most consecutive Lady Byng Trophies: Frank Boucher and Pavel Datsyuk, 4
  • Most William M. Jennings Trophies: Patrick Roy and Martin Brodeur, 5[10]
    • Most consecutive William M. Jennings Trophies: Patrick Roy and Brian Hayward, 3
  • Most Vezina Trophies: Jacques Plante, 7[11]
    • Most consecutive Vezina Trophies: Jacques Plante, 5
  • Most Jack Adams Awards: Pat Burns, 3[12]

Goals[edit]

  • Most career goals (regular season): Wayne Gretzky, 894
  • Most career goals (playoffs): Wayne Gretzky, 122
  • Most career goals (total): Wayne Gretzky, 1,016
  • Most goals, single season: Wayne Gretzky (1981–82), 92
  • Most goals, single season for a rookie: Teemu Selänne (1992–93), 76
  • Most goals, in single playoffs season: Reggie Leach (1976) and Jari Kurri (1985), 19
  • Most goals, single season including playoffs: Wayne Gretzky (1983–84), 100
  • Most goals, single playoff series: Jari Kurri (six-game series) (1985), 12
  • Most goals in a Stanley Cup Final series: Cyclone Taylor (1918, five games), Frank Foyston (1919, five games), and Babe Dye (1922, five games), 9
  • Most goals in the Stanley Cup Finals, career: Maurice Richard, 34
  • Most goals, 50 games from start of season: Wayne Gretzky (1981–82 and 1983–84), 61
  • Fastest 50 goals from start of season: Wayne Gretzky (December 30, 1981), 39 games
  • Most goals, one regular season game: Joe Malone (January 31, 1920), 7
  • Most goals, one regular season home game: Joe Malone (January 31, 1920), 7
  • Most goals, one regular season road game: Red Berenson (November 7, 1968), 6
  • Most goals, one playoff game: Newsy Lalonde (March 1, 1919), Maurice Richard (March 23, 1944), Darryl Sittler (April 22, 1976), Reggie Leach (May 6, 1976), and Mario Lemieux (April 25, 1989), 5
  • Most goals, one home playoff game: Maurice Richard (March 23, 1944), Darryl Sittler (April 22, 1976), Reggie Leach (May 6, 1976), and Mario Lemieux (April 25, 1989), 5
  • Most goals, one road playoff game: Newsy Lalonde (March 1, 1919), 5
  • Most goals, one regular season game for a rookie in their first game: Auston Matthews (October 12, 2016), 4
  • Most goals scored by a single player in an expansion team's inaugural season: William Karlsson (2017–18), 43
  • Most goals, one period: Max Bentley (January 28, 1943), Busher Jackson (November 20, 1934), Clint Smith (March 4, 1945), Red Berenson (November 7, 1968), Wayne Gretzky (February 18, 1981), Grant Mulvey (February 3, 1982), Bryan Trottier (February 13, 1982), Tim Kerr (April 13, 1985), Al Secord (January 7, 1987), Joe Nieuwendyk (January 11, 1989), Peter Bondra (February 5, 1994), Mario Lemieux (January 26, 1997), and Patrick Marleau (January 23, 2017), 4
  • Most goals, one playoff period: Tim Kerr (April 13, 1985) and Mario Lemieux (April 25, 1989), 4
  • Most goals in one period during the Stanley Cup Finals: Busher Jackson (April 5, 1932), Ted Lindsay (April 5, 1955), Maurice Richard (April 6, 1957), Wayne Gretzky (May 25, 1985), Dirk Graham (June 1, 1992), and Peter Forsberg (June 6, 1996), 3
  • Most goals in different ways: Mario Lemieux (December 31, 1988) full strength, powerplay, shorthanded, penalty shot and empty net, 5
  • Most game-winning goals in a single season: Phil Esposito (1970–71 and 1971–72) and Michel Goulet (1983–84), 16
  • Most game-winning goals in a single playoffs season: Brad Richards (2004), 7
  • Most game-winning goals in a playoff series: Mike Bossy (six-game series) (1983), 4
  • Most career game-winning goals: Jaromir Jagr, 135
  • Most career game-winning goals (playoffs): Wayne Gretzky and Brett Hull, 24

Assists[edit]

  • Most assists regular season career: Wayne Gretzky, 1,963
  • Most assists playoffs career: Wayne Gretzky 260
  • Most assists career, including playoffs: Wayne Gretzky, 2,223
  • Most assists, one season: Wayne Gretzky (1985–86), 163
  • Most assists, one playoff season: Wayne Gretzky (1987–88), 31
  • Most assists, one season, including playoffs: Wayne Gretzky (1985–86), 174
  • Most assists, playoff series: Rick Middleton (seven-game series) (1983), Wayne Gretzky (six-game series) (1985), 14
  • Most assists, one game: Billy Taylor (March 16, 1947) and Wayne Gretzky (February 15, 1980, December 11, 1985, and February 14, 1986), 7
  • Most assists, one home game: Wayne Gretzky (February 15, 1980, and February 14, 1986), 7
  • Most assists, one road game: Billy Taylor (March 16, 1947) and Wayne Gretzky (December 11, 1985), 7
  • Most assists, one playoff game: Mikko Leinonen (April 8, 1982), and Wayne Gretzky (April 9, 1987), 6
  • Most assists, one playoff home game: Mikko Leinonen (April 8, 1982), and Wayne Gretzky (April 9, 1987), 6
  • Most assists, one period: Dale Hawerchuk (March 6, 1984), 5

Points[edit]

  • Most points regular season career: Wayne Gretzky, 2,857
  • Most points playoff career: Wayne Gretzky, 382
  • Most points career, including playoffs: Wayne Gretzky, 3,239
  • Most points, one season: Wayne Gretzky (1985–86), 215
  • Fastest 100 points from the start of a season: Wayne Gretzky (December 27, 1981), 34 games
  • Most points, one season, including playoffs: Wayne Gretzky (1984–85), 255
  • Most points, one playoff season: Wayne Gretzky (1985), 47
  • Most points, one game: Darryl Sittler (February 7, 1976), 10
  • Most points, one home game: Darryl Sittler (February 7, 1976), 10
  • Most points, one road game: Peter Stastny and Anton Stastny, (February 22, 1981), 8
  • Most points, one playoff game: Patrik Sundstrom (April 22, 1988) and Mario Lemieux (April 25, 1989), 8
  • Most points, one playoff home game: Patrik Sundstrom (April 22, 1988) and Mario Lemieux (April 25, 1989), 8
  • Most points, one period: Bryan Trottier (December 23, 1978) and Mika Zibanejad (March 17, 2021), 6
  • Most points, one playoff series: Rick Middleton (seven-game series) (1983), 19
  • Most points, team's first postseason: Reilly Smith (2018), 22
  • Most points in the Finals, one series: Wayne Gretzky (1988), 13
  • Most points in the Finals, career: Jean Beliveau, 62

Plus/minus[edit]

  • Best ± rating, regular season career: Larry Robinson, +722
  • Best ± rating one season: Bobby Orr (1970–71), +124
  • Best ± rating one game: Tom Bladon (December 11, 1977, 11–1 game against the Cleveland Barons), +10
  • Worst ± rating, season: Bill Mikkelson (1974–75), -82
  • Worst ± rating, regular season game: Greg Joly (March 15, 1977), -9
  • Worst ± rating, regular season career: Bob Stewart, -257
  • Best ± rating playoffs career: Jari Kurri, +101
  • Best ± rating one playoff season: Wayne Gretzky (1984–85), +27
  • Best ± rating, playoff game: Pat Stapleton and Bill White (April 25, 1971), and Brad Park (April 20, 1983), +7
  • Worst ± rating playoffs career: Tomas Sandstrom, -45
  • Worst ± rating one playoff season: Paul Reinhart (1982–83), -16

Power-play goals[edit]

  • Most power-play goals, career: Dave Andreychuk, 274
  • Most power-play goals, one season: Tim Kerr (1985–86), 34
  • Most power-play goals, one season for a defenseman: Sheldon Souray (2006–07), 19
  • Most power-play goals, career playoffs: Brett Hull38,
  • Most power-play goals, one playoff season: Mike Bossy, (1981), and Cam Neely, (1991), 9
  • Most power-play goals, one playoff series: Chris Kontos (seven-game series), (1989), 6
  • Most power-play goals, one playoff game: Syd Howe (March 23, 1939), Sid Smith (April 10, 1949), Phil Esposito (April 2, 1969), Johnny Bucyk (April 2, 1969), Denis Potvin (April 17, 1981), Tim Kerr (April 13, 1985), Jari Kurri (April 3, 1987), Mark Johnson (April 22, 1988), Dino Ciccarelli (April 29, 1993, May 11, 1995) and Valeri Kamensky (April 24, 1997), Jonathan Toews (May 7, 2010), 3
  • Most power-play goals, one playoff game period: Tim Kerr (April 13, 1985), 3
  • Most power-play goals, rookie Joe Nieuwendyk (1987–88) 31

Shorthanded goals[edit]

  • Most shorthanded goals, career: Wayne Gretzky, 73
  • Most shorthanded goals, career playoffs: Mark Messier, 14
  • Most shorthanded goals, one season: Mario Lemieux (1988–89), 13
  • Most shorthanded goals, one playoff season: Derek Sanderson (1969), Bill Barber (1980), Lorne Henning (1980), Wayne Gretzky (1983), Wayne Presley (1989), Todd Marchant (1997), and Tobias Rieder (2020) 3
  • Most shorthanded goals, one playoff series: Bill Barber (five-game series) (1980) and Wayne Presley (six-game series) (1989), 3
  • Most shorthanded goals, one game: Theoren Fleury (March 9, 1991), 3
  • Most shorthanded goals, rookie: Jordan Staal (2006–07), 7
  • Most two-man shorthanded goals, career: Mike Richards, 3

Overtime[edit]

  • Most overtime goals, career: Alexander Ovechkin, 22
  • Most playoff overtime goals, career: Joe Sakic, 8
  • Most overtime assists, career: Henrik Sedin, 23
  • Most playoff overtime assists, career: Brian Skrudland, Doug Gilmour and Joe Sakic, 6
  • Most overtime points, career: Patrik Elias, 37
  • Most playoff overtime points, career: Joe Sakic, 14
  • Most overtime goals, season: Steven Stamkos (2011–12), Jonathan Toews (2015–16), Alex Galchenyuk (2016–17), and Brad Marchand (2017–18),5
  • Most overtime goals by a rookie, season: Shayne Gostisbehere, 4
  • Most overtime goals, playoffs season: Mel Hill, Maurice Richard, and Corey Perry3
  • Most overtime goals, one playoff series: Mel Hill, 3
  • Most consecutive overtime goals: Andrew Cogliano (2007–08) and Nathan Horton (2010–11), 3

Goals/assists/points by position[edit]

  • Most goals by a centre, career: Wayne Gretzky, 894
  • Most goals by a centre, one season: Wayne Gretzky (1981–82), 92
  • Most assists by a centre, career: Wayne Gretzky, 1,963
  • Most assists by a centre, one season: Wayne Gretzky (1985–86), 163
  • Most points by a centre, career: Wayne Gretzky, 2,857
  • Most points by a centre, one season: Wayne Gretzky (1985–86), 215
  • Most goals by a left wing, career: Alexander Ovechkin, 706
  • Most goals by a left wing, one season: Alexander Ovechkin (2007–08), 65
  • Most assists by a left wing, career: John Bucyk, 813
  • Most assists by a left wing, one season: Joe Juneau (1992–93), 70
  • Most points by a left wing, career: Luc Robitaille, 1,394
  • Most points by a left wing, one season: Luc Robitaille (1992–93), 125
  • Most goals by a right wing, career: Gordie Howe, 801
  • Most goals by a right wing, one season: Brett Hull (1990–91), 86
  • Most assists by a right wing, career: Jaromir Jagr, 1,155
  • Most assists by a right wing, one season: Jaromir Jagr (1995–96) and Nikita Kucherov (2018-19), 87
  • Most points by a right wing, career: Jaromir Jagr, 1,921
  • Most points by a right wing, one season: Jaromir Jagr (1995–96), 149
  • Most goals by a defenseman, career: Ray Bourque, 410
  • Most goals by a defenseman, one season: Paul Coffey (1985–86), 48
  • Most goals by a defenseman, one game: Ian Turnbull (February 2, 1977), 5
  • Most assists by a defenseman, career: Ray Bourque, 1,169
  • Most assists by a defenseman, one season: Bobby Orr (1970–71), 102
  • Most assists by a defenseman, one game: Babe Pratt (January 8, 1944), Pat Stapleton (March 30, 1969), Bobby Orr (January 1, 1973), Ron Stackhouse (March 8, 1975), Paul Coffey (March 14, 1986), and Gary Suter, (April 4, 1986), 6
  • Most points by a defenseman, career: Ray Bourque, 1579
  • Most points by a defenseman, one season: Bobby Orr (1970–71), 139
  • Most points by a defenseman, one game: Tom Bladon (December 11, 1977) and Paul Coffey (March 14, 1986), 8
  • Most points by a defenseman, one playoff year: Paul Coffey (1985), 37
  • Most goals by a goaltender regular season career: Martin Brodeur (February 15, 2000 & March 21, 2013), 2
  • Most goals by a goaltender in the playoffs: Ron Hextall (April 11, 1989) and Martin Brodeur (April 17, 1997), 1
  • Most goals by a goaltender career, including playoffs: Martin Brodeur, 3
  • Most assists by a goaltender, one season: Grant Fuhr, (1983–84) 14
  • Most assists by a goaltender, regular season career: Tom Barrasso, 48
  • Most assists by a goaltender playoffs one season Martin Brodeur (2011–12), 4
  • Most assists by a goaltender, playoffs career: Grant Fuhr, 14
  • Most assists by a goaltender, career, including playoffs: Grant Fuhr (46 regular season, 14 playoffs), 60
  • Most assists by a goaltender, one game Jeff Reese (February 10, 1993), 3
  • Most points by a goaltender, one season: Grant Fuhr (1983–84), 14 - all assists
  • Most points by a goaltender regular season career: Tom Barrasso, 48 - all assists
  • Most points by a goaltender career, including playoffs Grant Fuhr (46 regular season, 14 playoffs), 60
  • Most points by a goaltender regular season one game: Jeff Reese (February 10, 1993), 3 - all assists
  • Most points by a goaltender playoffs one season Martin Brodeur (2011–12), 4 - all assists
  • Most points by a goaltender, one period: Jeff Reese (February 10, 1993), 3 - all assists

Records by a rookie[edit]

  • Most goals by a rookie, one season: Teemu Selanne (1992–93), 76
  • Most goals by a player in his first NHL season, one game: Joe Malone (December 19, 1917, January 12, 1918 and February 2, 1918), Howie Meeker (January 8, 1947) and Don Murdoch (October 12, 1976), 5
  • Most goals by a player in his first NHL game: Joe Malone (December 19, 1917), 5
  • Most goals by a rookie in his first NHL game: Auston Matthews (October 12, 2016), 4
  • Most assists by a rookie, one season: Peter Stastny (1980–81) and Joe Juneau (1992–93), 70
  • Most assists by a player in his first NHL season, one game: Wayne Gretzky (February 15, 1980), 7
  • Most assists by a player in his first NHL game: Dutch Reibel (October 8, 1953), 4
  • Most points by a rookie, one season: Teemu Selanne (1992–93), 132
  • Most goals by a rookie, one playoff season: Dino Ciccarelli (1981), 14
  • Most assists by a rookie, one playoff season: Marian Stastny and Ville Leino (2010), 14
  • Most points by a rookie, one playoff season: Dino Ciccarelli (1981), Ville Leino (2010), and Jake Guentzel (2017), 21
  • Most points by a player in his first NHL season, one game: Peter Stastny and Anton Stastny (February 22, 1981), 8
  • Most points by a player in his first NHL game: Al Hill (February 14, 1977), 5
  • Most points by a rookie, first playoff game: Dominik Kubalik (August 1, 2020), 5
  • Most goals by a rookie defenseman, one season: Brian Leetch (1988–89), 23
  • Most assists by a rookie defenseman, one season: Larry Murphy (1980–81), 60
  • Most points by a rookie defenseman, one season: Larry Murphy (1980–81), 76
  • Longest goal scoring streak in his first NHL Season: Joe Malone (1917–18), 14 games
  • Longest point streak by a rookie, one season: Paul Stastny (February 3, 2007 – March 17, 2007), 20 games
  • Longest point streak by an eighteen-year-old: Nathan MacKinnon (January 10, 2014 – March 6, 2014), 13 games
  • Longest point streak by a rookie defenseman: Shayne Gostisbehere (January 19, 2016 – February 20, 2016), 15 games

Points/goals/assists per game average[edit]

  • Highest goals-per-game average, career (among players with 200-or-more goals): Mike Bossy, .762
  • Highest goals-per-game average including playoffs, career (among players with 200-or-more goals): Mario Lemieux, .749
  • Highest goals-per-game average, one season (among players with 20-or-more goals): Joe Malone (1917–18), 2.20
  • Highest goals-per-game average, one season (among players with 50-or-more goals): Wayne Gretzky (1983–84), 1.18
  • Highest assists-per-game average, career (among players with 300-or-more assists): Wayne Gretzky, 1.320
  • Highest assists-per-game average, one season (among players with 35-or-more assists): Wayne Gretzky (1985–86), 2.04
  • Highest points-per-game average, career (among players with 500-or-more points): Wayne Gretzky, 1.921
  • Highest points-per-game average, one season (among players with 50-or-more-points): Wayne Gretzky (1983–84), 2.77

Milestone goal seasons[edit]

  • Most 20-or-more goal seasons: Gordie Howe, 22
  • Most consecutive 20-or-more goal seasons: Gordie Howe (1949–1971), 22
  • Most 30-or-more goal seasons: Mike Gartner, 17
  • Most consecutive 30-or-more goal seasons: Mike Gartner (1979–1994) Jaromir Jagr (1991–2007) and Alexander Ovechkin (2005-2020), 15
  • Most 40-or-more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky, 12
  • Most consecutive 40-or-more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky (1979–1991), 12
  • Most 50-or-more goal seasons: Mike Bossy and Wayne Gretzky, 9
  • Most consecutive 50-or-more goal seasons: Mike Bossy (1977–1986), 9
  • Most 60-or-more goal seasons: Mike Bossy and Wayne Gretzky, 5
  • Most consecutive 60-or-more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky (1981–1984), 4
  • Most 70-or-more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky, 4
  • Most consecutive 70-or more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky (1981–1984), 4
  • Most 80-or-more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky, 2
  • Most 90-or-more goal seasons: Wayne Gretzky, 1

Hat trick or better games[edit]

  • Most three-or-more goal games, career: Wayne Gretzky, 50
  • Most three-or-more goal games, playoffs career: Wayne Gretzky, 8
  • Most three-or-more goal games, one season: Wayne Gretzky (1981–82 and 1983–84), 10
  • Most three-or-more goal games, one playoffs season: Jari Kurri (1985), 4
  • Most three-or-more goal games, one playoff series: Jari Kurri (1985), 3
  • Most four-or-more goal games, one season: Joe Malone (1917–18), 5
  • Most five-or-more goal games, one season: Joe Malone (1917–18), 3

Goal/assist/point streaks[edit]

  • Longest consecutive goal-scoring streak from start of NHL career: Joe Malone (1917–18), 14 games
  • Longest consecutive goal-scoring streak: Punch Broadbent, 16 games (1921–22)
  • Longest consecutive goal-scoring streak, one playoff season: Reggie Leach10 games (1976)
  • Longest consecutive goal-scoring streak by a defenseman: Mike Green (2008–09), 8 games
  • Longest consecutive assist-scoring streak: Wayne Gretzky (1990–91), 23 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak: Wayne Gretzky (1983–84), 51 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak, one playoff season: Bryan Trottier (1981), 18 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak, multiple playoff seasons: Bryan Trottier (1980, 1981, 1982), 27 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak from start of season: Wayne Gretzky (1983–84), 51 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak by a defenseman from start of season: John-Michael Liles (2010–11), 9 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak by a defenseman: Paul Coffey (1985–86), 28 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak by a rookie forward: Paul Stastny (2006–07), 20 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak by a rookie defenseman: Shayne Gostisbehere (2015–16), 15 games
  • Longest consecutive point-scoring streak by a teenager: Patrik Laine (2017–18), 15 games

Fastest goals[edit]

  • Fastest goal from start of game: Merlyn Phillips (December 29, 1926), Doug Smail (December 20, 1981), Bryan Trottier (March 22, 1984), and Alexander Mogilny (December 21, 1991), 5 seconds
  • Fastest goal from start of game, playoffs: Don Kozak (April 17, 1977), 6 seconds
  • Fastest goal from start of period: Claude Provost (November 9, 1957), Denis Savard (January 12, 1986), and James van Riemsdyk (March 28, 2014), 4 seconds
  • Fastest goal from start of period, playoffs: Don Kozak (April 17, 1977), and Pelle Eklund (April 25, 1989), 6 seconds
  • Fastest goal by a player in his first NHL game: Gabriel Vilardi (February 20, 2020), 10 seconds
  • Fastest two goals from start of game: Mike Knuble (February 14, 2003), 27 seconds
  • Fastest two goals from start of game, playoffs: Dick Duff (April 9, 1963), 68 seconds
  • Fastest two goals from start of period, playoffs: Pat LaFontaine (May 19, 1984), 35 seconds
  • Fastest two goals: Nels Stewart (January 3, 1931) and Deron Quint (December 15, 1995), 4 seconds
  • Fastest two goals, playoffs: Joe Malone (February 22, 1919), and Norm Ullman (April 11, 1965), 5 seconds
  • Fastest three goals: Bill Mosienko (March 23, 1952), 21 seconds
  • Fastest three assists: Gus Bodnar (March 23, 1952), 21 seconds
  • Fastest regular season overtime goal: Mats Sundin, Alexander Ovechkin, William Nylander, David Legwand, and Andreas Athanasiou, 6 seconds
  • Fastest playoff overtime goal: Brian Skrudland (May 18, 1986), 9 seconds
  • Fastest goal after being scored on: Doug Gilmour (December 19, 1987), and Mikael Granlund (January 5, 2016), 2 seconds

Shots[edit]

  • Most shots on goal, career: Ray Bourque, 6,206
  • Most shots on goal, playoffs career: Ray Bourque, 812
  • Most shots on goal, one season: Phil Esposito (1970–71), 550
  • Most shots on goal, one playoff season: Henrik Zetterberg (2008), 116
  • Most shots on goal, one game: Ray Bourque (March 21, 1991), 19
  • Most shots on goal, one playoff game: Daniel Briere (April 22, 2006), 14
  • Most shots on goal, one period: Evander Kane, 10

Hits[edit]

  • Most hits, one season: Matt Martin (2014–15), 382
  • Most hits, one playoff season: Blake Coleman (2020), 126
  • Most hits, regular season career: Dustin Brown, 3,166
  • Most hits, playoff career: Brooks Orpik, 499
  • Most hits, one regular season game: Gary Roberts (March 10, 1999) and Zdeno Chara (November 3, 1999) 17
  • Most hits, one playoff game: Brenden Morrow (May 4, 2008), 19

Blocked shots[edit]

  • Most blocked shots, one season: Kris Russell (2014–15), 283
  • Most blocked shots, one playoff season: Anton Volchenkov (2007), 80
  • Most blocked shots, career: Brent Seabrook, 1998
  • Most blocked shots, playoffs career: Dan Girardi, 383
  • Most blocked shots, one game: Kris Russell (March 5, 2015), 15
  • Most blocked shots, one playoff game: Anton Volchenkov (May 12, 2007 and March 22, 2010) and David Savard (August 11, 2020), 11

Time on Ice[edit]

  • Most time on ice per game by a defenseman, one season: Ryan Suter (2013–14), 29:25
  • Most time on ice per game by a forward, one season : Paul Kariya (1998–99), 25:16
  • Most time on ice per game by a defenseman, playoff season (minimum 10 games): Chris Pronger, 35:52
  • Most time on ice per game by a forward, playoff season (minimum 10 games): Alexei Kovalev, 26:35
  • Most time on ice by a defenseman, one regular season game: Dennis Wideman (January 18, 2014), 38:05
  • Most time on ice by a forward, one regular season game: Vyacheslav Kozlov (October 10, 2003), 30:00
  • Most time on ice by a defenseman, one playoff game: Seth Jones (August 11, 2020), 65:06
  • Most time on ice by a forward, one playoff game: Jaromir Jagr (May 4, 2000), 59:08

Penalty shots[edit]

  • Most penalty shot goals, career: Pavel Bure, 7
  • Most penalty shot goals, playoffs career: Michael Frolik, 2
  • Most penalty shot goals, one season: Pavel Bure, 3
  • Most penalty shot attempts, career: Vincent Lecavalier, 13
  • Most penalty shot attempts, playoffs career: Mats Sundin and Michael Frolik, 2
  • Most penalty shot attempts, one season: Erik Cole, 5
  • Most penalty shot attempts, one game: Erik Cole (November 9, 2005), Max Pacioretty (February 6, 2009), and Auston Matthews (November 3, 2017), 2
  • Most penalty shots faced by a goaltender, career: Marc-Andre Fleury, 21
  • Most penalty shots faced by a goaltender, playoffs career: Dominik Hasek, 5
  • Most penalty shots faced by a goaltender, one game: Ben Bishop (October 8, 2015), Miikka Kiprusoff (March 4, 2011), Roberto Luongo (February 6, 2014), and Jonathan Quick (November 3, 2017), 2
  • Most penalty shots stopped by a goaltender, career: Marc-Andre Fleury, 15
  • Most penalty shots stopped by a goaltender, playoffs career: Dominik Hasek, 4
  • Most penalty shots allowed by a goaltender, career: Tomas Vokoun, 8

Penalties[edit]

  • Most penalties, one game: Chris Nilan (March 31, 1991), 10
  • Most penalties, one playoff game: Forbes Kennedy (April 2, 1969), Kim Clackson (April 20, 1980), and Dale Hunter (April 22, 1988), 8
  • Most penalties, one period: Randy Holt (March 11, 1979), 9
  • Most penalty minutes, career: Tiger Williams, 3,966
  • Most penalty minutes, playoffs career: Dale Hunter, 729
  • Most penalty minutes, career, including playoffs: Tiger Williams, 4,421
  • Most penalty minutes, one season: Dave Schultz (1974–75), 472
  • Most penalty minutes, one playoffs season: Chris Nilan (1986), 141
  • Most penalty minutes, one game: Randy Holt (March 11, 1979), 67
  • Most penalty minutes, one playoff game: Billy Coutu (March 7, 1923), Dave Schultz (April 22, 1976), and Deryk Engelland (April 17, 2015), 42
  • Most penalty minutes, one period: Randy Holt (March 11, 1979), 67
  • Most penalty minutes, one playoff period: Billy Coutu (March 7, 1923) and Deryk Engelland (April 17, 2015), 42
  • Most penalty minutes, career, in the Stanley Cup Final: Gordie Howe, 94

Goaltending[edit]

  • Most wins by a goaltender regular season career: Martin Brodeur, 691
  • Most wins by a goaltender playoffs career: Patrick Roy, 151
  • Most wins by a goaltender career, including playoffs: Martin Brodeur 804
  • Best Winning Percentage (minimum 250 played): Ken Dryden.740 in 397 games played
  • Best Winning Percentage (minimum 500 games played): Jacques Plante.610 in 837 games played
  • Most wins by a goaltender, one season: Martin Brodeur (2006–07) and Braden Holtby (2015–16), 48
  • Most wins by a goaltender, career, in the Finals: Jacques Plante, 25
  • Most wins by a goaltender, expansion team season: Marc-Andre Fleury (2017–18 Vegas Golden Knights), 28
  • Most wins by a rookie goaltender, single playoffs season: Jordan Binnington (2018–19 St. Louis Blues), 16
  • Most ties, career: Terry Sawchuk, 172
  • Most losses by a goaltender regular season career: Martin Brodeur, 397
  • Most losses by a goaltender playoffs career: Patrick Roy, 94
  • Most losses by a goaltender, one season: Gary Smith (1970–71), 48
  • Most losses by a goaltender, one playoff season: Ron Hextall (1987), Miikka Kiprusoff (2004), Henrik Lundqvist (2014), Ben Bishop (2015), 11
  • Most shutouts regular season career: Martin Brodeur 125
  • Most shutouts playoffs career: Martin Brodeur 24
  • Most shutouts by a goaltender, including playoffs, expansion team season: Marc-Andre Fleury (2017–18 Vegas Golden Knights), 9
  • Most shutouts, including playoffs career: Martin Brodeur 149
  • Most shutouts, one regular season: George Hainsworth (1928–29), 22
  • Most shutouts, one playoff season: Martin Brodeur (2002–03), 7
  • Most games appeared in by a goaltender, career regular season: Martin Brodeur, 1,265
  • Most games appeared in by a goaltender, career playoffs: Patrick Roy, 247
  • Most games appeared in by a goaltender career, including playoffs Martin Brodeur, 1,470
  • Most games appeared in by a goaltender career, in the Finals: Jacques Plante (Montreal-38), St. Louis-3), 41
  • Most consecutive complete games by a goaltender: Glenn Hall, 502 (1955–1962)
  • Most games appeared in by a goaltender, one regular season: Grant Fuhr, 79 (1995–96)
  • Most games appeared in by a goaltender, one playoff season Ron Hextall (1986–87), Jonathan Quick (2013–14) and Jordan Binnington (2018–19 St. Louis Blues season), 26
  • Most minutes played by a goaltender, career: Martin Brodeur, 74,380
  • Most minutes played by a goaltender, one season: Martin Brodeur (2006–07), 4,697
  • Least time played by a goaltender, career Jorge Alves Dec 31, 2016, 7.6 sec
  • Longest continuous shutout by a goaltender: Alec Connell (7 games, 2 periods) (1927–28), 461 minutes, 29 seconds
  • Longest continuous shutout by a goaltender at start of NHL career: Matt Hackett (December 6 & 8, 2011), 102 minutes, 48 seconds
  • Longest winning streak by a goaltender, one season: Gilles Gilbert (1975–76), 17 games
  • Longest winning streak to start a season: Jack Campbell (2020–21), 11 games
  • Longest undefeated streak by a goaltender, one season: Gerry Cheevers (24 wins, 8 ties 1971–72), 32 games
  • Longest undefeated streak by a goaltender in his first NHL season: Grant Fuhr (15 wins, 8 ties 1981–82), 23 games
  • Longest undefeated streak by a goaltender from start of career: Patrick Lalime (14 wins, 2 ties 1996–97), 16 games
  • Most 20-or-more win seasons by a goaltender Patrick Roy, 17
  • Most consecutive 20-or-more win seasons by a goaltender: Henrik Lundqvist (2005–2018), 13
  • Most 30-or-more win seasons by a goaltender: Martin Brodeur and Patrick Roy, 14
  • Most consecutive 30-or-more win seasons by a goaltender: Martin Brodeur (1995–2008), 12
  • Most consecutive 30-or-more win seasons to start a career: Henrik Lundqvist (2005–2012), 7
  • Most 40-or-more win seasons by a goaltender: Martin Brodeur 8
  • Most consecutive 40-or-more win seasons by a goaltender: Martin Brodeur (2005–2008) and Evgeni Nabokov (2007–10), 3
  • Most consecutive wins by a goaltender in his rookie season: Ross Brooks (1973–74), 12
  • Most consecutive wins by a goaltender in his first NHL season: George Hainsworth (1926–27), 11
  • Most losses by a goaltender regular season career: Martin Brodeur, 397
  • Most losses by a goaltender, one season: Gary Smith (1970–71), 48
  • Most home games played by a goaltender, one season: Roberto Luongo (2006–07), 41
  • Most shots faced by a goaltender, in a regular season game: Sam LoPresti (March 4, 1941), 83
  • Most shots faced by a goaltender, in a season: Roberto Luongo (2005–06), 2,488
  • Most shots faced by a goaltender, in a playoff game: Normie Smith (March 24, 1936), 92
  • Most saves by a goaltender career: Martin Brodeur, 28,928
  • Most saves by a goaltender playoffs career: Patrick Roy, 6,561
  • Most saves by a goaltender, including playoffs career: Martin Brodeur, 33,758
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a regular season game: Sam LoPresti (March 4, 1941), 80
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a playoff game: Normie Smith (March 24, 1936), 92
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a playoffs overtime game shutout: Normie Smith (March 24, 1936), 92
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a regular season shutout: Ben Scrivens (January 29, 2014), 59
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a season: Roberto Luongo (2003–04), 2,303
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a playoff run: Tim Thomas (2011), 798
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a Stanley Cup finals series: Tim Thomas (2011), 238
  • Most saves by a goaltender, in a playoff game shutout that did not go to overtime: Thatcher Demko (2020), 48
  • Highest save percentage, in a regular season (minimum 30 starts): Jacques Plante (1970–71), .944
  • Highest save percentage, playoffs (minimum 10 games): Jonathan Quick (2012), .946
  • Most goals-against, one regular season game: Frank Brophy (March 3, 1920), 16
  • Most goals-against, one playoff game: Paul Bibeault (March 20, 1944), 11
  • Fewest goals-against, regular season (minimum 30 games): Alec Connell (1925–26), 42
  • Most goals-against, regular season (minimum 30 games): Ken McAuley (1943–44), 310
  • Fewest goals-against, playoffs (minimum 10 games): Jacques Plante (1969), 14
  • Most goal-against, playoffs (minimum 10 games): Kelly Hrudey (1993), 74
  • Lowest goals-against average, regular season (minimum 20 games): George Hainsworth, 0.92
  • Lowest goals-against average, playoffs (minimum 10 games): Frank Brimsek, 1.25
  • Highest goals-against average, regular season (minimum 20 games): Frank Brophy, 7.11
  • Highest goals-against average, playoffs (minimum 10 games): Murray Bannerman, 4.77
  • Most overtime wins: Roberto Luongo, 49
  • Most penalty minutes by a goaltender regular season career: Ron Hextall, 584
  • Most penalty minutes by a goaltender playoffs career: Ron Hextall, 115
  • Most penalty minutes by a goaltender career, including playoffs: Ron Hextall (584 regular season, 115 playoffs), 699
  • Most penalty minutes by a goaltender one season Ron Hextall (1988–89), 113
  • Most penalty minutes by a goaltender one playoff season Ron Hextall (1986–87), 43
  • Youngest goaltender to win 50 regular-season games: Patrick Roy 22 yrs
  • Youngest goaltender to win 100 regular-season games: Patrick Roy 23 yrs
  • Youngest goaltender to win 200 regular-season games: Martin Brodeur 26 yrs., 1 mos
  • Youngest goaltender to win 300 regular-season games: Martin Brodeur 29 yrs., 7 mos.
  • Youngest goaltender to win 400 regular-season games: Martin Brodeur 31 yrs., 10 mos.
  • Youngest goaltender to win 500 regular-season games: Martin Brodeur 35 yrs., 6 mos.
  • Youngest goaltender to win 600 regular-season games: Martin Brodeur 37 yrs., 11 mos.
  • Quickest goaltender to win 400 regular-season games: Henrik Lundqvist 727
  • Most Stanley Cup finals series played by a goaltender: Jacques Plante (Montreal: 8 (1953, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60); St. Louis: 2 (1969, 70)), 10
  • Most Stanley Cup consecutive finals series played by a goaltender: Jacques Plante (Montreal (1953, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60), 8
  • Fewest saves required in a win: Ryan Miller (Anaheim Jan. 25, 2018) 11:40 min; Antti Niemi (Dallas Dec. 12, 2015) 6:43 min; Richard Bachman (Dallas Mar. 29, 2013) 2:32 min; Craig Billington (Colorado Dec. 21, 1998) 1:52 min, (Colorado Dec. 31, 1996) 0:12 sec; Steve Weeks (NY Rangers Mar. 24, 1982) 0:17 sec 0

Shootout[edit]

  • Most shootout goals in one season: Ilya Kovalchuk (2011–12), 11
  • Most game-deciding shootout goals in one season: Ilya Kovalchuk (2011–12), 7
  • Most shootout goals career: Jonathan Toews, 50
  • Most game-deciding shootout goals career: Frans Nielsen, 23
  • Highest shootout percentage (Minimum 15 attempts): Artemi Panarin, 61.5% (16/26)
  • Most shootout attempts in a season: Radim Vrbata, 18
  • Most shootout attempts career: Joe Pavelski, 115
  • Most shootout games played by a goaltender in a season: Martin Brodeur (2006–07), 16
  • Most shootout games played by a goaltender career: Roberto Luongo, 110
  • Most shootout wins by a goaltender in a season: Ryan Miller and Martin Brodeur (2006–07), Mathieu Garon (2007–08), and Jonathan Quick (2010–11), 10
  • Most shootout wins by a goaltender career: Henrik Lundqvist, 61
  • Most shootout losses by a goaltender in a season: Tomas Vokoun (2009–10) and Tuukka Rask (2014–15), 9
  • Most shootout losses by a goaltender career: Roberto Luongo, 58
  • Most goals allowed in a shootout by a goaltender career: Roberto Luongo, 133
  • Most saves in a shootout by a goaltender career: Henrik Lundqvist, 293

Age[edit]

  • Oldest Forward: Gordie Howe, April 11, 1980, 52 years, 11 days
  • Oldest Defensemen: Chris Chelios, April 6, 2010, 48 years, 71 days
  • Oldest Goaltender: Maurice Roberts, November 25, 1951, 45 years, 345 days
  • Oldest Player to play his first NHL game: Connie Madigan, February 6, 1973, 38 years, 94 days
  • Oldest Goalie to play his first NHL game: David Ayres , February 22, 2020, 42 years 194 days
  • Oldest Goalie to win his regular-season debut: David Ayres , February 22, 2020, 42 years, 194 days[1], as an emergency backup goaltender for the Carolina Hurricanes in a 6–3 win against the Toronto Maple Leafs
  • Youngest Player to play his first NHL game: Bep Guidolin, November 12, 1942, 16 years, 337 days
  • Youngest Goalie to play his first NHL game: Harry Lumley, December 23, 1943, 17 years, 42 days
  • Oldest Goalie to play in Stanley Cup Finals: Lester Patrick, April 7, 1928, 44 years, 90 days
  • Oldest Defensemen to play in the Stanley Cup Finals: Doug Harvey, May 11, 1968, 43 years, 137 days
  • Oldest Forward to play in Stanley Cup Finals: Mark Recchi, June 15, 2011, 43 years, 134 days
  • Youngest Player to play in the Stanley Cup Finals: Gaye Stewart, April 14, 1942, 18 years, 290 days
  • Youngest Player to win the Stanley Cup: Larry Hillman, April 14, 1955 18 years, 68 days (played 2 games in Semi-finals, did not play in the finals)
  • Oldest Player to win the Stanley Cup: Chris Chelios, June 4, 2008, 46 years, 130 days (did not play in 2008 finals, so Doug Harvey keeps record for oldest defenceman to play in finals)
  • Oldest Goalie to win the Stanley Cup: Lester Patrick April 14, 1928, 44 years, 90 days

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Individual All Time Career Records (1918 - 2011)". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved January 8, 2016.
  2. ^"Hart Memorial Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. July 15, 2015.
  3. ^"Ted Lindsay Award". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  4. ^"Conn Smythe Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  5. ^"James Norris Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  6. ^"Maurice Richard Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  7. ^"Art Ross Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  8. ^"Frank J. Selke Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  9. ^"Lady Byng Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  10. ^"William M. Jennings Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  11. ^"Vezina Trophy". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  12. ^"Jack Adams Award". NHL Enterprises, L.P. Retrieved July 15, 2015.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^Chicago (5), Toronto (29), and Montreal (43)
  2. ^Detroit (37) and Toronto (28)
  3. ^Montreal (65)
  4. ^Montreal (20), Pittsburgh (4), and Detroit (12)
  5. ^Montreal Canadiens: 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971, 1973
  6. ^Montreal: 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979 (Coach); Pittsburgh: 1991 (Director of Player Development-Recruitment), 1992 (Head Coach); Detroit: 1997, 1998, 2002 (Head Coach), 2008 (Consultant); Chicago: 2010, 2013, 2015 (Senior Advisor)
  7. ^Montreal: 1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1965, 1966, 1968, 1969, 1971 (Player); 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979, 1986, 1993 (Senior Vice President)
  8. ^Winnipeg Victorias: 1901; Montreal AAA: 1902, 1903; Montreal Wanderers: 1907, 1910; Toronto Blueshirts: 1914
  9. ^Toronto Blueshirts: 1914; Seattle Metropolitans: 1917; Toronto Arenas: 1918; Victoria Cougars: 1925
  10. ^Player: Detroit 1954, Chicago 1961, Toronto 1962, 1964; Coach: New York Islanders 1980, 1981, 1982, 1983
  11. ^Ottawa Senators: 1920, 1921, 1923 (Manager); Chicago: 1934 (Manager/Coach); Montreal Maroons: 1935 (Manager/Coach); Montreal Canadiens: 1944, 1946 (Manager)
  12. ^Montreal: 1973, 1976, 1977, 1978, 1979 (Coach); Pittsburgh: 1991 (Director of Player Development-Recruitment), 1992 (Head Coach); Detroit: 1997, 1998, 2002 (Head Coach), 2008 (Consultant); Chicago: 2010, 2013, 2015 (Senior Advisor)

Sources[edit]

  • NHL Official Guide and Record Book, 2016
  • www.nhl.com

National Hockey League-related lists and topics

History
Personnel
Records
  • League records (individual, team)
  • Statistical leaders (by country of birth)
  • Points, career (min. 1,000)
  • Assists, career (min. 1,000)
  • Goals, career (min. 500)
  • Points, season (min. 100)
  • Goals, season (min. 50)
  • 50 goals in 50 games
  • Games, career (min. 1,000)
  • Consecutive games, career (min. 500)
  • PIMs, career (min. 2,000)
  • 5+ goals, game
  • 8+ points, game
  • Goaltender wins, career (min. 300)
  • Goaltenders who have scored
  • Wayne Gretzky's records
  • Gordie Howe's records
  • Longest winning streaks
  • Longest losing streaks
Related
Other
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_NHL_records_(individual)


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