Giant trance 29 2 review

Giant trance 29 2 review DEFAULT

The Giant Trance 29 2 is the perfect example to prove that we can no longer categorise bikes just by the length of their travel. With just 115 mm at the rear, you don’t expect too much from it at first – but you will be surprised at what it’s capable of!

For an overview of the test fleet head to The best budget trail bike of 2019 – 11 mountain bikes head to head

The Giant Trance 29 is a bike that Giant fans have long been waiting for. Up until recently, you wouldn’t have found large 29er wheels on any of Giant’s trail bikes. However, unlike its small-wheeled counterpart, this bike only has 130 mm travel at the front and 115 mm at the rear. On our € 2,599 test bike, the suspension consists of a FOX Rhythm fork and a FOX Performance shock. Despite the large wheels fitted with durable MAXXIS Minion DHF and DHR II tires, the bike weighs just 14.08 kg – chapeau! The rest of the spec left no room for criticism, except the SRAM Guide T brakes. Paired with small 180 mm rotors lack power and reliability – these are worth upgrading. Giant’s in-house Contact cockpit has all the right dimensions, the dropper post has 150 mm travel and the SRAM NX-Eagle drivetrain provides sufficient range for long days in the saddle. Unfortunately, the finish of the bike clouds the otherwise very positive first impression. The chainstay protector came off after the first ride, the remote lever of the dropper post has a lot of play and the rubber grommets at the inlets of the internal cable routing regularly came loose.

The Giant Trance 29 is full of surprises. On flowing trails, we don’t know of a bike that’s more fun!

The Giant Trance 29 2 in detail

Fork FOX 34 Rhythm FLOAT 130 mm
Shock FOX Performance FLOAT DPS 115 mm
Brakes SRAM Guide T 180/180 mm
Drivetrain SRAM NX Eagle
Seatpost Giant Contact Switch 150 mm
Stem Giant Contact SL 50 mm
Handlebar Giant Contact TR Riser Bar 780 mm
Wheels Giant XCT Disc Laufrad-Satz 29″
Tires MAXXIS Minion DHF/DHR II 2.3/2.3″

SizeSMLXL
Seat tube380 mm431 mm482 mm507 mm
Top tube592 mm612 mm632 mm652 mm
Head tube95 mm110 mm110 mm120 mm
Head angle66,5°66,5°66,5°66,5°
Seat angle74,5°74,5°74,5°74,5°
Chainstays435 mm435 mm435 mm435 mm
BB Drop35 mm35 mm35 mm35 mm
Wheelbase1,154 mm1,176 mm1,196 mm1,218 mm
Reach426 mm442 mm462 mm480 mm
Stack599 mm613 mm613 mm622 mm

The Giant Trance 29 2 in test

The Giant Trance 29 2 bridges the gap between aggressive XC bikes and more capable and comfortable trail bikes. This is also reflected in the riding position which is slightly stretched and aggressive, but perfectly suitable for long rides. The pedalling position is efficient on even terrain, but on steep climbs, we would have liked a slightly steeper seat tube angle. Pushing the saddle forward helps compensate a little. The Trance 29’s firmly tuned Maestro linkage pedals efficiently and is spritely, saving you the effort of having to reach for the climb switch on the shock.

On flat, flowing trails, the Giant Trance 29 2 rewards every bit of the rider’s input with forward propulsion. If you get on the pedals, the bike sprints forward, if you pump it through a compression, you’ll generate a lot of speed and if you pull up at a jump, you’ve got to be careful not to overshoot your landing. This bike is a hell of a lot of fun, setting the benchmark in terms of pop and direct handling. The geometry is excellently balanced, keeping an equal amount of weight on the front and back wheel in the corners without the rider having to actively shift their weight. The bike’s handling is very stable and predictable as a result. It is this balance that also makes the Trance so easy to control, even in demanding terrain. Although you quickly reach the limit of the available travel, the bike remains composed. However, you’ll have to keep a firm grip of the bars on rough trails and you’ll be significantly slower than on the longer-travel bikes from this test field.

Despite the short travel l, you’ll be surprised what the Trance 29 is capable of!

Conclusion

The Giant Trance 29 2 is the perfect bike for those with easy, flowing home trails and those who value direct, agile and lively handling. You’re guaranteed to have a good time on this bike, and on top of that, it would make for an excellent mile muncher. On more challenging trails, the bike is a bit out of its depth.

Tops

  • lots of fun on flowing trails
  • super agile, lively handling with a lot of pop
  • good value for money

Flops

  • short travel (not enough for rough trails)
  • brakes lack power and reliability
  • poor quality finish

Riding Characteristics

12

Uphill

1
  1. sluggish
  2. efficient

Agility

2
  1. cumbersome
  2. playful

Stability

3
  1. nervous
  2. confident

Handling

4
  1. demanding
  2. balanced

Suspension

5
  1. harsh
  2. plush

Fun Factor

6
  1. planted
  2. poppy

Value for money

7
  1. terrible
  2. very good

For more info head to:giant-bicycles.com

The test field

For an overview of the test fleet head to The best budget trail bike of 2019 – 11 mountain bikes head to head

All bikes in test:Canyon Spectral CF 7.0 | FOCUS JAM 6.8 NINE | MERIDA ONE FORTY 800 | Propain Tyee AM Performance | RADON SLIDE TRAIL 8.0 | ROSE PIKES PEAK AM1 | SCOTT Genius 950 | Specialized Stumpjumper Comp Alloy 29 | Trek Remedy 8 | YT JEFFSY 27 AL Base

Words & Photos: Christoph Bayer

Sours: https://enduro-mtb.com/en/giant-trance-29-2-review/

Trance 29 2

  • Sizes

    S, M, L, XL

  • Colours

    Black/Teal

  • Frame

    ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum, 115mm Maestro suspension

  • Fork

    Fox 34 Float Rhythm, 130mm, GRIP damper, Boost 15x110 Kabolt, 44mm offset, custom tuned for Giant

  • Shock

    Fox Float DPS Performance, 165/42.5, custom tuned for Giant

  • Handlebar

    Giant Contact TR35, 780x35mm, 20mm rise

  • Stem

    Giant Contact SL 35

  • Seatpost

    Giant Contact Switch dropper post with remote, 30.9

  • Saddle

    Giant Romero

  • Pedals

    N/A

  • Shifters

    Shimano SLX

  • Front Derailleur

    N/A

  • Rear Derailleur

    Shimano SLX

  • Brakes

    Shimano MT520

  • Brake Levers

    Shimano MT501

  • Cassette

    Shimano SLX, 12-speed, 10x51

  • Chain

    KMC X-12

  • Crankset

    Shimano SLX, 30t

  • Bottom Bracket

    Shimano, press fit

  • Rims

    Giant AM 29 wheelset, alloy, 30mm inner

  • Hubs

    Shimano Boost [F] 15x110 [R] 12x148, sealed bearing

  • Spokes

    Sapim

  • Tires

    [F] Maxxis Minion DHF 29x2.3, 3C, EXO, TR [R] Maxxis Aggressor 29x2.3, 3C, EXO, TR, tubeless

  • Extras

    tubeless prepared

  • Weight

    The most accurate way to determine any bike’s weight is to have your local dealer weigh it for you. Many brands strive to list the lowest possible weight, but in reality weight can vary based on size, finish, hardware and accessories. All our bikes are designed for best-in-class weight and ride quality.

  • Sours: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/ca/trance-29-2
    1. Mossberg patriot 270 wood stock
    2. All souls cemetery visiting hours
    3. Jack wills t shirts
    4. My foldaway fan double offer
    5. Lego movie wii u game

    The not-so-minor details

    06Aug2020

    The Giant Trance X is back! Forget everything you knew about the old one though, because this 2021 model is a very different beast


    Positives

    - Big-trail and big-speed ready
    - Excellent new-school geometry
    - Impressive technical climbing abilities
    - Trail-tuning flip-chip
    - Supportive & smooth suspension

    Negatives

    - Fork has already developed bushing knock
    - Creaky saddle
    - The heavy wheels

    Wil reviews the 2021 Giant Trance X 29

    Big news from the bike brand with the big name, Giant has an all-new full suspension mountain bike for 2021, and it’s called the Trance X. Equipped with a 150mm travel fork and 135mm of rear travel, the Trance X is a chunky 29er trail bike that will be squeezing its way into the Giant lineup in between the current Trance 29 and Reign 29.

    To see what’s new and how it all performs on the trail, Giant sent us out two bikes – the alloy Trance X 29 2, and the carbon Trance X Advanced Pro 29 0 – to put to the test on our local trails. Here we’ll be going into our ride experience with the alloy bike, but you can also see our review of the carbon model here. Either way, this isn’t just the most contemporary Trance we’ve ever seen from Giant, there are no doubts it’s the most exciting too. And we reckon it’s going to prove to be a very hot competitor for the likes of the Trek Fuel EX and Specialized Stumpjumper.


    Watch our review of the 2021 Giant Trance X here!


    2021 giant trance x 29 2 wil
    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Pairing mid-travel suspension with progressive geometry isn’t exactly new, but it is for Giant. The result is an entertaining trail bike that climbs and descends steep, technical terrain equally well, without the numbing ride quality that longer travel enduro bikes can often suffer from.

    giant trance x 29 2021

    The Trance X is back! What’s changed?

    Who here remembers the old Trance X 29er from 2013? You know, the one that looked like it had been rammed into a wall? At the time, it was the longest travel 29er that Giant had every designed, with a humongous 120mm of travel at both ends. However, it was only available for two years before Giant famously shelved its 29er offerings altogether in favour of exclusive adoption of 27.5in wheels.

    Despite its short shelf life though, the Trance X 29er had a huge impact – we remember seeing them everywhere at the time, and these days it’s not uncommon to see those polished silver and white frames still being battered around the trails.

    Remember the original Giant Trance X? That bike had a huge impact during its short lifespan, but things have moved on a lot since then.

    Aside from the name and the fact that it also has 29in diameter wheels, the new Giant Trance X thankfully shares nothing in common with that old bike.

    For a start, it looks a zillion times better. While it’s still curvy, the curves are more gentle, with much longer frame geometry allowing each tube a bit more breathing room.

    Overall it looks a lot like a mini Reign 29er, with similar lines shared between the two. Of course it also features the Maestro dual-link suspension design, with a single-piece compression moulded composite rocker link driving the trunnion-mounted rear shock. Rear travel is only 11mm shorter than the Reign 29 (135mm vs 146mm), and the fork is also pretty close too (150mm vs 160mm).

    And then you see the angles.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2 wil

    Properly progressive geometry

    Giant has obviously had its eye on current geometry trends, and while the new Trance X isn’t exactly breaking any boundaries, it is pushing towards the edges, particularly for a brand that has historically stood on the conservative side.

    Out of the box the Trance X’s head angle sits at 65.5°, and reach goes up to a very generous 519mm on the XL frame. To keep the climbing position in check, there’s a steep 77.2-77.93° effective seat tube angle. That last number is a big improvement over the current Trance 29 (74.5°) and it’s also steeper than the Reign 29 (76.8°). See what we mean about this being progressive?

    2021 giant trance x 29 geometry

    Adjustable flip-chip

    Furthermore, the geometry is adjustable on the Trance X. This is new for Giant, and it’s very much a welcome addition for the trail rider that wants to tune the handling according to their trails and riding style.

    The geometry flip-chip is discreetly located in the rearward pivot on the rocker link, which you can access via a 5mm hex key. You’ll have to do both sides, but in my experience it’s a quick and easy adjustment to make on the side of the trail.

    The Trance X will come from the factory setup in the Low position, and flipping it into the High position will steepen the head and seat angles by 0.73°, while lifting the BB height by 10mm. This is a more substantial adjustment compared to the Fuel EX’s flip chip (0.5° & 7mm) and the Stumpjumper (0.5° & 6mm), so you can expect to feel more of a difference between the two settings.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    The geometry flip-chip is discreetly located in the rearward pivot on the rocker link, which you can access via a 5mm hex key.

    Also worth noting is that adjusting the flip chip does have a slight impact on suspension performance, since the leverage ratio becomes slightly lower when you flip it into the High position. All things being equal, this will make the rear suspension feel a touch firmer, which should match the higher BB and steeper angles.

    Battle armour

    Also new for the Trance X is a soft, low durometer rubber used for the downtube belly armour and chainstay protection. Both rubber panels feature a rippled pattern that supposedly improves its ability to absorb impacts and deaden sound.

    Further big-hitting credentials include the clearance for up to a 2.5in wide rear tyre, ISCG 05 chainguide tabs, and low-profile thru-axles front and rear. The frame itself boasts shapely tubes and large junctions, with a tapered head tube up top and a 92mm wide PF92 bottom bracket shell. Despite the low-slung top tube and Maestro suspension design, there’s still room to fit a water bottle inside the mainframe.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    For our Medium test bike with the tyres setup tubeless, it clocked in at 15.02kg on the Scales Of Broken Dreams™. That is kinda chunky.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Giant Trance X 29 price & specs

    Giant will be offering five Trance X 29 models in Australia for 2021. The two cheaper models are built around an ALUXX SL hydroformed alloy frame, while the other three feature a full carbon Advanced Pro frame. For pricing and specs on the carbon models, head here.

    Worth noting is that since the Trance X is an addition to the Giant lineup. That means the current Trance 29 will continue to be available for 2021, where it will coexist alongside the new Trance X.

    2021 giant trance x 29 3

    2021 Giant Trance X 29 3

    • Frame | ALUXX SL Alloy, Maestro Suspension Design, 135mm Travel
    • Fork | RockShox 35 Gold RL, DebonAir Spring, 44mm Offset, 150mm Travel
    • Shock | Fox Float DPS, Performance Series, 185x55mm
    • Wheels | Giant Performance Disc Hubs & AM Alloy Rims, 30mm Inner Width
    • Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 2.5 WT Front & Dissector EXO 2.4 WT Rear
    • Drivetrain | SRAM SX Eagle 1×12 w/SX Eagle 30T Crankset & 11-50T Cassette
    • Brakes | Shimano MT420 4-Piston w/203mm Front & 180mm Rear Rotors
    • Bar | Giant Contact Trail Riser, 35mm Diameter, 780mm Wide
    • Stem | Giant Contact SL, 35mm Diameter, Length: 40mm (S/M), 50mm (L/XL)
    • Seatpost | Giant Contact Switch, 30.9mm Diameter, Travel: 125mm (S), 150mm (M), 170mm (L/XL)
    • Saddle | Giant Romero
    • Available Sizes | Small, Medium, Large, Extra-Large
    • RRP | $3,799 AUD
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    2021 Giant Trance X 29 2

    • Frame | ALUXX SL Alloy, Maestro Suspension Design, 135mm Travel
    • Fork | Fox Rhythm 36, GRIP Damper, 44mm Offset, 150mm Travel
    • Shock | Fox Float DPS, Performance Series, 185x55mm
    • Wheels | Shimano MT-410 Hubs & Giant AM Alloy Rims, 30mm Inner Width
    • Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 2.5 WT Front & Dissector EXO 2.4 WT Rear
    • Drivetrain | Shimano SLX 1×12 w/SLX 30T Crankset & 10-51T Cassette
    • Brakes | Shimano MT520 4-Piston w/203mm Front & 180mm Rear Rotors
    • Bar | Giant Contact Trail Riser, 35mm Diameter, 780mm Wide
    • Stem | Giant Contact SL, 35mm Diameter, Length: 40mm (S/M), 50mm (L/XL)
    • Seatpost | Giant Contact Switch, 30.9mm Diameter, Travel: 125mm (S), 150mm (M), 170mm (L/XL)
    • Saddle | Giant Romero
    • Available Sizes | Small, Medium, Large, Extra-Large
    • RRP | $4,499 AUD

    There’s a new women’s specific Liv Intrigue too

    But wait, there’s more! Giant’s sister brand Liv also has a new full suspension bike to unveil, which is simply called the Intrigue 29. As its name suggests, it’s a 29er version of the existing Intrigue 27.5, though that’s kinda downplaying the fact that this is Liv’s first ever 29er trail bike.

    The Intrigue 29 is based on the Trance X 29, and it also features the Maestro suspension design with the new geometry flip chip. The two frames are different however, with the Intrigue featuring women’s specific geometry and fit. It’s a touch steeper with a 65.8° head angle (Low) and the reach has been brought in a bit. The suspension travel is a bit shorter too, with the Intrigue 29 featuring a 140mm fork and 125mm of rear wheel travel.

    Only one Intrigue model is coming into Australia for 2021 – the Liv Intrigue 29 2.

    2021 liv intrique 29 2

    2021 Liv Intrigue 29 2

    • Frame | ALUXX SL Alloy, Maestro Suspension Design, 125mm Travel
    • Fork | Fox Rhythm 36, GRIP Damper, 44mm Offset, 140mm Travel
    • Shock | Fox Float DPS, Performance Series
    • Wheels | Shimano MT-410 Hubs & Giant AM Alloy Rims, 30mm Inner Width
    • Tyres | Maxxis Minion DHF EXO 2.5 WT Front & Dissector EXO 2.4 WT Rear
    • Drivetrain | Shimano SLX 1×12 w/SLX 30T Crankset & 10-51T Cassette
    • Brakes | Shimano MT520 4-Piston w/180mm Rotors
    • Bar | Giant Contact Trail Riser, 35mm Diameter, Width: 760mm (S/M), 780mm (L)
    • Stem | Giant Contact SL, 35mm Diameter, 50mm Length
    • Seatpost | Giant Contact Switch, 30.9mm Diameter
    • Saddle | Liv Sylvia
    • Available Sizes | Small, Medium & Large
    • RRP | $4,499 AUD
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Testing the 2021 Giant Trance X 29

    The bike I’ve been testing is the Trance X 29 2, which features a Shimano SLX 1×12 drivetrain, 4-piston brakes, a Fox 36 Rhythm fork, and Giant-branded finishing kit.

    Our test bike arrived prior to the official release, so I’ve been able to get a load of riding on it. That’s given me plenty of time to get a solid impression of what this bike is all about, how it compares to the existing Trance 29 (a bike we know very well here at Flow), and what it’s capable of.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    It’s not particularly light

    I will start by saying the Trance X 29 2 isn’t exactly what you’d call light. For our Medium test bike with the tyres setup tubeless, it clocked in at 15.02kg on the Scales Of Broken Dreams™. That is kinda chunky. Though not totally unexpected given ‘The Fattening‘ we’ve witnessed amongst the trail and enduro market over recent years, with brands choosing to spec big-stanchioned forks, wide rims and burlier tyres. On top of that, as frames get longer and slacker, of course there’s more material there too.

    In the case of the Trance X, there’s quite a lot of mass to be found in the wheelset, which is made up of basic Shimano MT410 hubs, straight-gauge spokes, brass nipples and Giant’s own AM rims. Confirmed weight for the relatively basic hoops is a DH-worthy 2.46kg. That’s heavy! If you owned this bike and wanted to throw money at an upgrade, you could drop a serious amount of weight by going to a lighter wheelset.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Going up!

    Despite the weighty wheels, the Trance X climbs well. Like, surprisingly well. Giant has played a clever trick by spec’ing a Dissector on the back, rather than the oft-chosen Minion DHR II that typically pairs with the Minion DHF up front. The Dissector may have less braking bite, and it may also be rounder and driftier in loose conditions, but it is also quicker rolling than the DHR II with noticeably less drag. But that’s not only it.

    The Trance X’s climbing zest is borne from that steep 77.2° seat angle, which centres you nicely between the wheels, putting your hips and knees further over the bottom bracket. As soon as you’re moving uphill you notice the difference compared to the slacker 74.5° seat angle on the Trance 29. In comparison, the new Trance X is more efficient and more comfortable. And because your body mass isn’t levering off the back of the bike so much, the shock doesn’t sink into its travel as much, and that helps to maintain that nice steep seat angle for longer.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Combined with the long wheelbase, low gearing and active suspension design, this bike is a seriously good climber. By that I don’t mean on smooth fireroads where you do feel the weight, but on actual singletrack climbs. The sort of technical ascents where you need to negotiate tricky turns, rocky ledges and narrow gaps. In these situations it’s an absolutely brilliant climber, with an excellent seated climbing position and gobs of grip generated from the supple Maestro suspension linkage and trunnion-mounted Float DPS shock. In fact, on the very first ride I managed to clean one horribly steep climb that I’ve only ever been able to clean on an e-MTB. It was thoroughly satisfying, and a glowing endorsement of the Trance X’s technical uphill chops.

    Those who like to stomp and dance on the pedals may wish to engage the blue compression switch, but for seated climbing I left the shock wide open, allowing the rear tyre to continue driving for traction.

    Eye-watering good times

    While I didn’t expect the climbing proficiency, I did expect the Trance X to go downhill well. And you’ll be happy to know that it does. The suspension is active, the Maxxis Wide Trail tyres are well-connected, and the big Fox 36 chassis gives a stout and dependable front end. While it may be the cheaper Rhythm model, the GRIP damper offers a supple and thoroughly active ride, keeping the front tyre stuck down. Most will enjoy the responsive feel, though bigger and jumpier riders will likely benefit from adding a volume spacer or two for added support.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2 wil

    Giant recommends you setup the Fox Float DPS shock with 30% sag. For my 68kg riding weight, 160psi was the magic pressure. There’s flexibility to fit a smaller or larger volume spacer inside the large volume EVOL air can, but I found the progression out of the box to feel great, with no harsh bottoming to speak of. There’s decent support to the back end, which means the Trance X never gives off that sluggish vibe that bigger travel, heavily damped enduro bikes can suffer from. It’s got a sporty, poppy vibe to it, and that encourages you to seek out the fun lines, imaginary lips and transitions.

    While the long wheelbase and low BB give usable stability on the descents for keeping up with longer travel folk, I did find I was smashing both the pedals and the MRP bashguard regularly on the first couple of rides. In the spirit of science, I flipped the geo chip into the High position, which instantly made a difference. Pedalling through ugly, technical rock gardens was a lot easier, thanks to the added 10mm of clearance below my flailing pedals.

    Certainly for more natural rutted-out singletrack, the High position is the way to go. Though given how quick it is to adjust the geometry, and how noticeable the difference is, it offers a genuine trail-tuning tool for those who wish to exploit it. I’d happily drop it into the Low position for a long weekend of bikepark-style riding at Bright, before flipping it back to High for my local trails.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2 wil

    Any issues so far?

    Within the first ride the Fox 36 developed some very annoying bushing knock. This is likely due to poor tolerances between the upper tubes and the internal bushings, which results in a knocking sensation that feels just like a loose headset. It isn’t totally uncommon, and it does happen to forks over time as the bushings wear. It is totally unacceptable for it to happen within the first 15km of riding though, and very disappointing from Fox. Thankfully such an issue would be covered under warranty as a manufacturing defect, but it’d be nice if it didn’t happen at all.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Our test bike has also developed a persistent creak in the saddle, which is equally irritating given the rest of the bike is so quiet and smooth. The saddle is Giant’s new Romero model, and hopefully the creaking is an isolated issue with our test bike, as it’s pretty comfortable and likely to be a popular update over the previous Contact saddle.

    The only other hiccup I encountered is that I’ve already managed to put a nasty snakebike in the Dissector. I wasn’t running particularly low pressures, but it does only have the standard EXO casing, and at 937g it is on the lighter side given its size (the front tyre is 1,036g for reference). With the Trance X offering some serious go-fast capability for a bike with only 135mm of travel at the rear, I feel that I was coerced into going a lot faster than I should have been. Yes, I’m blaming the bike for encouraging such a reckless, spontaneous, and horrendous made-up transition on one particular descent, which caused said snakebite.

    Anyway, you’ll work out pretty quickly if the Trance X wants you to put a more aggressive rear tyre on it, or perhaps a tubeless insert for a little more protection.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Giant Trance X vs Trance 29

    We were already fans of the Trance 29er, which showcased some of the most progressive geometry we’d seen from Giant when it debuted back in 2018. It did so in a tight little 115mm travel package that punched well above its weight, resulting in a riotously lively ride on snaky singletrack. For riders who wanted more fun and more capability than an XC bike could offer, but still wanted something that was efficient and involving to ride, the Trance 29 has been quite the thrilling option.

    So how does this new Trance X compare to the existing Trance 29?

    giant trance 29 1 trx 1 xcr 0 carbon wheels

    Well obviously it has more travel – 20mm more at each end. And the Trance X has a Fox 36, rather than the skinnier Fox 34 found on the Trance 29. Of course the bigger suspension brings more capability and comfort on rough terrain, but it’s really the geometry that separates these two bikes. The Trance X is notably slacker and longer, which helps to increase high-speed stability, giving more security when things get steep and hectic. And with more suspension in reserve, it’ll keep chewing the trail for longer.

    Where it gets a little confusing is the fact that it also climbs better than the Trance 29, a direct result of that much steeper seat angle and longer wheelbase. Yes there’s more suspension between you and the trail, but the more central riding position helps to boost efficiency and balance. The rougher the conditions and the more technical the climb, the better the Trance X gets.

    Geometry is all about compromise though, and one bike can’t do it all. The Trance X isn’t quite as sharp on really tight singletrack and on flatter terrain compared to the Trance 29, so it isn’t as nippy. But I’d say that’s about it. The Trance X is otherwise a better and more capable trail bike in every way.

    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2
    2021 giant trance x 29 2

    Flow’s Verdict

    Giant has introduced a belting addition to its full suspension lineup with the Trance X. Pairing mid-travel suspension with progressive geometry isn’t exactly new, but it is for Giant. The result is an entertaining trail bike that climbs and descends steep, technical terrain equally well, without the numbing ride quality that longer travel enduro bikes can often suffer from.

    The thrashers and smashers will likely still choose the Reign 29 for pure enduro racing duties, but if that sort of race is only likely to pop up a few times a year on your calendar, I wouldn’t hesitate turning up on this Trance X. Indeed in Australia, where we’re not so blessed with huge mountains and 30-minute long alpine descents, the Trance X is likely to be a more popular, and more practical option with domestic enduro-ers.

    It is plenty quick, which is supported by the grippy rubber, stout fork, and the big 4-piston brakes. Sure it could do with some lighter wheels, but overall this is a solid package for the money. And it certainly sits favourably alongside the equivalent Trek Fuel EX and Specialized Stumpjumper, especially when you consider the forward-thinking geometry that Giant has committed to.

    Alongside this alloy model, we’ve also been testing out the carbon version too. To see what you get for the extra coin, along with a comparison between the carbon and alloy frames, check out our Giant Trance X Advanced Pro 29 review.

    2021 giant trance x alloy vs carbon
    Sours: https://flowmountainbike.com/tests/first-ride-review-2021-giant-trance-x-29-2/
    Giant Trance 29 2 (review)

    Trance X 29 2

  • Sizes

    S, M, L, XL

  • Colors

    Balsam Green/Black/Chrome

  • Frame

    ALUXX SL-Grade Aluminum front and rear triangles, 135mm Maestro suspension, flip chip

  • Fork

    Fox 36 Float Rhythm, 150mm, GRIP damper, Boost 15x110 QR, 44mm offset, custom tuned for Giant

  • Shock

    Fox Float DPS Performance, 185/55, custom tuned for Giant

  • Handlebar

    Giant Contact TR35, 780x35mm, 20mm rise

  • Stem

    Giant Contact SL 35

  • Seatpost

    Giant Contact Switch dropper with remote, 30.9

  • Saddle

    Giant Romero

  • Pedals

    platform

  • Shifters

    Shimano SLX

  • Front Derailleur

    N/A

  • Rear Derailleur

    Shimano SLX

  • Brakes

    Shimano MT520

  • Brake Levers

    Shimano MT501

  • Cassette

    Shimano SLX, 10x51

  • Chain

    KMC X-12

  • Crankset

    Shimano MT510, 30t

  • Bottom Bracket

    Shimano, press fit

  • Rims

    Giant AM 29, alloy

  • Hubs

    Shimano, sealed bearing

  • Spokes

    Sapim

  • Tires

    [F] Maxxis Minion DHF 29x2.5, 3C, EXO, TR [R] Maxxis Dissector 29x2.4, 3C, EXO, TR, tubeless

  • Extras

    tubeless prepared

  • Weight

    The most accurate way to determine any bike’s weight is to have your local dealer weigh it for you. Many brands strive to list the lowest possible weight, but in reality weight can vary based on size, finish, hardware and accessories. All our bikes are designed for best-in-class weight and ride quality.

  • Sours: https://www.giant-bicycles.com/us/trance-x-29-2

    Review 29 giant trance 2

    When the Giant Trance Advanced 29 was launched back in 2018, it was one of the first brands to promote the idea of doing more with less.

    Read more: 10 hottest short-travel ‘downcountry’ mountain bikes

    The trend at the time was for trail bikes with ever-increasing amounts of travel, but billed squarely as a trail bike, the 115mm travel Trance went against the flow. But it worked. The Maestro twin-link suspension tuned to give impressive small-bump sensitivity but with enough progression to stop bottom-out forces transferring to the lightweight chassis.

    giant trance advanced

    Giant Trance Advanced Pro 29 2 review

    Fast-forward to today and there are plenty of short-travel trail bikes to choose from, so is the Trance 29 still relevant? Not if you are just looking at frame sizing alone. We measured the reach on the size large at 456mm, making it the shortest bike in this test. Standover is also pretty tall, so there’s not much room to upsize. The rest of the geometry is on point, however, and as is so often the case, the static numbers on a geometry chart don’t paint the complete picture.

    Giant Trance Advanced

    Co-pivot design delivers 115mm of travel via Fox DPS shock

    Suspension

    By using the main pivot of the lower suspension link as the shock mount, Giant’s co-pivot design isn’t just a neat packaging solution, it also eliminates the shock bushing and any associated friction. Combine this with the bearings at the anchor points for the trunnion mount shock in the upper link, and the suspension response on the Giant Trance Advanced is sublimely smooth.

    With three compression settings on the Fox DPS shock, you can toggle between fully open for maximum traction, platform mode for more support when climbing, or simply lock it out. With the shock being so low in the frame, however, you’ll need to be flexible enough to touch your toes in order to reach the lever from the saddle.

    Up front, travel has been increased to 130mm, and the Fox 34 Rhythm suspension fork is a great match for the sensitivity and progression of the rear suspension. At first glance it sounds like a lot more travel than on the rear, but when you factor in the 66° head angle and look at vertical-wheel travel, rather than just how much the fork compresses, it measures 118mm, so is almost identical.

    Dula-bolt seatpost clamp is overkill and standover could be better

    Components

    Giant’s in-house components look functional rather than flashy, but don’t take that as a criticism – it’s all top-quality kit. The four-piston SRAM Guide brakes don’t have as solid a lever feel as the Level brakes on the NS Synonym TR, but they do have noticeably more power, the Maxxis Minion tyres translating the hydraulic advantage of the four-piston calipers through the contact patch more effectively. One small change to the specification this year that we’re really happy about is the saddle, the pointed back now filled in so it can’t snag your shorts or stab you in the gut.

    In-house carbon wheels are the fast-track to speed

    Performance

    On our 60-minute test loop, the Giant Trance Advanced was the only bike on which we didn’t return to the van with pins and needles in our hands. Same trail, same tyres and pressures, same day and the exact same conditions – so we’re confident when we say that it’s a direct result of the superior suspension response.

    So even though it has less travel than the NS Synonym TR or Marin Rift Zone, the Giant Trance Advanced uses it so much more effectively. And it wasn’t just on the roughest sections of trail that the gains were obvious either. Its ability to iron out the smallest bumps means the Trance bowls along pitted fire roads at a blistering pace. The progressive nature of the suspension also makes the bike lively and playful, so loading the suspension to pop out of a turn, or ride light over some roots, becomes child’s play.

    And if it’s a more conservative suspension response you crave, adding a couple of clicks of rebound damping to the shock is enough to calm the bikes exuberance and direct more of your energy into forward propulsion.

    giant trance advanced

    Verdict

    What the Trance Advanced Pro 29 2 lacks in stature is compensated for by its composed, balanced handling. The well-damped carbon frame and neural response from the suspension never dulls the senses, it just makes it much easier to ride fast and have fun. And unlike most short-travel bikes that write cheques the suspension can't cash, the Giant offers a safety net that belies its 115mm travel. Would we like a longer, lower front end? Of course we would, because we’re convinced there’s room for the Trance frame to grow before reaching the limits of the suspension.

    Details

    Frame:Advanced carbon, 115mm travel

    Shock:Fox Float DPS Performance

    Fork:Fox 34 Float Rhythm Grip, 130mm travel

    Wheels:Giant TRX-1 110/148mm hubs, Giant TRX-1 Composite rims, Maxxis Minion DHF/DHR II 29x2.3in tyres

    Drivetrain:Truvativ Descendent 6k 30t, 170mm chainset, SRAM NX Eagle r-mech and shifter

    Brakes:SRAM Guide T four-piston, 180mm

    Components:Giant Contact TR35 780m bar, Contact SL 55mm stem, Contact Switch 150mm post, Contact saddle

    Sizes:M, L, XL

    Weight:13.33kg (29.39lb)

    Contact:giant-bicycles.com

    Size tested:L

    Head angle:66.1°

    Actual seat angle:67.8°

    Effective seat angle:75.1°

    BB height:336mm

    Chainstay:434mm

    Front centre:736mm

    Wheelbase:1,195mm

    Down tube:722mm

    Top tube:620mm

    Sours: https://www.mbr.co.uk/reviews/full-suspension-bikes/giant-trance-advanced-pro-29-2
    2020 GIANT TRANCE 29 2

    Giant Trance 29 2 review

    Smooth short-travel suspension and light weight make the 29er Giant Trance a fun playbike, but frame and wheel flex can get you into trouble on more challenging trails.

    Giant Trance 29 2 frame

    While the 650b Trance has 140mm of rear travel, the new 29er gets just 115mm. Giant’s twin-link ‘Maestro’ system keeps the shock low in the frame and a trunnion mount gives maximum smoothness.

    Chain guide tabs on the press-fit bottom bracket, plus a 66.5-degree head angle and 460mm reach (large), show the bike is aimed at more radical riders than its travel might suggest.

    Giant Trance 29 2 kit

    The hard-riding vibe is backed up by a Truvativ Descendant crankset powering the NX Eagle gears, a 780mm bar in a 50mm stem and 180mm brake rotors.

    Maxxis’s Minion tyres are a high-control, all-conditions combo too, and come set up tubeless. Fox’s Rhythm 34 is our favourite affordable fork, providing consistent control when pushed hard.

    Mick Kirkman / Immediate Media

    Giant Trance 29 2 ride impressions

    With a relatively low weight and eagerly mobile suspension, the Trance 29 feels alive and engaged on flatter trails. Even with the drag of big tyre knobs, the light wheels pick up pace pretty well.

    There’s obvious suspension movement, but it doesn’t disturb your pedalling or feel bouncy. Loads of supple ground connection means climbing grip is rarely a concern. The 74.5-degree seat angle requires you to slide onto the saddle nose for steep climbs, but feels more natural for flatter pedalling.

    It’s when you try to carry that easy speed onto trickier terrain that the trouble starts. There are moments when an impact comes through the short-travel rear end properly hard. What really undermines confidence, though, is the squirm and flex through the frame and wheels. If you’re pushing hard, things can quickly get out of shape.

    On the flipside, the way the Giant naturally defaults onto the line of least resistance helps to flatter its traction and travel. Its all-round smoothness also reduces fatigue, so as an all-day XC/trail bike, it’s still well worth a look.

    Sours: https://www.bikeradar.com/reviews/bikes/mountain-bikes/giant-trance-29-2-review/

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    Sours: https://99spokes.com/bikes/giant/2021/trance-29-2


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