Who makes ac pro condensers

Who makes ac pro condensers DEFAULT

Note: This article only talks about the central air conditioner. If you are looking for a window AC or mini-split AC, you can read our Best Window Air Conditioners or Best Mini-split AC Guide.

How much does a central air conditioner cost installed? We answer that question in detail in this central AC price guide. The comprehensive discussion covers 4 important factors:

Each factor affects the price. When you read elsewhere that “the average central air conditioner costs $5,000 installed,” that information alone doesn’t tell you enough. For that cost, the unit could be a cheap, large and inefficient AC suitable for a large home in the North, or it could be a medium-sized, high-efficiency and high-quality model suitable for small homes in hot climates.

Here are the topics addressed in this Central Air Conditioner Price and Review Guide:

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Factors Affecting AC Unit Price

Let’s consider those 4 important keys to central air conditioner cost. This input will allow you to determine the ac unit that is right for your home.

1. Quality

Not all air conditioner brands offer similar quality. Here are the top companies divided by their place in the market. We’ve put brands together in parenthesis that have the same parent company and essentially the same product lineup:

  • Budget brands – (lowest cost, 12 to 16-year durability): Examples are Payne, Aire-Flo, Airtemp, Goodman and Ameristar.
  • Standard brands – (moderate cost, 15 to 18-year durability): Examples are (Heil, Arcoaire, ComfortMaker, KeepRite and Tempstar), (Armstrong and Ducane), (Rheem and Ruud), (Daikin and Amana), (Luxaire, York and Coleman), (Maytag, Broan, Westinghouse, Tappan, Frigidaire, Nordyne and NuTone), Bosch
  • Premium brands – (highest cost, 18 to 25-year durability): Examples are Lennox, (American Standard and Trane), (Carrier, Bryant and Day & Night)

Many sister brands make air conditioners that are identical except for the name. These air conditioner lists from Heil and Tempstar demonstrate the point.

Interestingly, all the brands in that group are owned by United Technology Corporation, the parent company of Carrier and Bryant in the premium category. This shows that UTC is seeking to capture consumers in various segments of the market. Lennox does the same thing with its Ducane and Aire-Flo brands.

2. Performance

Regardless of the quality niche they’re in, all brands make units in one or more of these performance categories:

  • Basic performance: These are single-stage central air conditioners with a SEER efficiency rating of 13-15. They are loud and might produce temperature fluctuations or cold spots in your home. All brands make “Basic” ACs.
  • Better performance: These are two-stage central air conditioners with SEER ratings of 16-19. They run on low, which is about 65 percent capacity, most of the time, so are quieter than single-stage units and cool more evenly. They’re more effective at dehumidifying your home too. Most brands make “Better” performance air conditioners.
  • Best performance: These are variable-capacity central air conditioners, called modulating or variable-speed by some brands. These units have compressors that modulate by very small degrees between 25 percent and 100 percent capacity with the result that the units are the quietest, most efficient, best at removing humidity and produce the most balanced temperatures. Variable-capacity ACs have SEER ratings as high as 26. These “Best” units are made by Standard and Premium brands.

3. Efficiency

The term SEER stands Seasonal Energy Efficiency Rating. Like gas mileage ratings, SEER is a rating of how many Btu’s of cooling the unit can produce for the electricity it uses. The higher the SEER, the more efficient the unit is.

Choosing the right efficiency rating for your purposes is discussed below.

4. Size (Ton)

Each residential AC model is produced in a range of sizes. Some start at 18,000 Btu while others start at 24,000 Btu. This is a measurement of the amount of heat per hour the units remove from your home. Most central air conditioner models increase incrementally by 6,000 to 12,000 Btu. The largest residential units are 60,000 Btu.

Within the industry, sizes are also spoken of in “tons”, a term that dates to using tons of ice to cool buildings. One ton of air conditioning capacity is equivalent to 12,000 Btu’s of cooling.

2021 Central Air Conditioner Prices

(Updated on Feb 9th, 2021)

Air conditioner prices are rising for a range of reasons including higher manufacturing costs, tariffs and the fact that today’s ACs are more efficient than ever before.

Because of that, we’ve updated pricing, so here are 2021 central air conditioner prices for all brands and ACs by size from 1.5 ton/18,000 BTUs to 5 ton/60,000 BTU.

What’s In These 2021 Air Conditioner Price Quotes?

The prices in the tables include everything – a complete system.

We’ve priced them in separate columns for:

1). Just the equipment

2). The whole system installed.

Most brands including the top names like Trane, Carrier and Lennox, are sold as a package: The equipment plus installation. You can only get them from local brand dealers and HVAC installers.

We itemize equipment and installation to see where your money will be going.

What’s in a Central Air Conditioning System?

A central air conditioner system is more than just the condensing unit – the outdoor unit usually referred to as the air conditioner.

If you sign a contract for a new air conditioning system, it will (at least should) include the following.

  • Condensing unit – outdoor unit
  • Indoor coil – housed in or near the furnace or air handler
  • Refrigerant line set to connect the coil in the condensing unit to the indoor coil
  • Refrigerant to fill the system, if the unit is not pre-filled or if the refrigerant line set is longer than usual.

Central AC Prices Table – AC + Installation

The prices in these table include all the equipment and materials plus AC installation labor cost.

Note: The price ranges are very broad for 2 reasons.

1). They cover all sizes, from 1.5 to 5.0 tons

2). They cover all series from basic to better to best, plus the lowest efficiency to the highest efficiency.

For example, Carrier makes Comfort (basic – up to 16 SEER), Performance (better – Up to 17 SEER) and Infinity (Best – Up to 21 SEER). Most brands make a similar range.

For a more detailed breakdown of costs, see our Brand Reviews and Price Guides for major air conditioner brands.

BrandEquipment OnlyInstalled Cost
Aire-Flo*$1,900 - $4,270$2,920 - $5,730
Amana$1,920 - $5,290$3,630 - $8,560
American Standard$2,470 - $7,000$4,300 - $10,620
Armstrong/Air Ease$2,300 - $5,660$4,070 - $9,750
Bryant$3,200 - $7,190$4,300 - $9,940
Carrier$3,420 - $7,680$4,620 - $10,860
Coleman$2,560 - $5,610$4,410 - $9,310
Comfortmaker$2,070 - $5,170$4,130 - $9,020
Daikin$2,320 - $5,540$3,820 - $9,900
Day & Night$2,310 - $5,090$3,760 - $9,070
Ducane*$2,110 - $3,950$3,410 - $7,050
Frigidaire$2,500 - $5,630$4,170 - $9,260
Gibson*$2,390 - $3,930$4,000 - $6,110
Goodman$1,590 - $4,080$2,850 - $6,920
Heil$2,090 - $5,300$3,730 - $8,990
JanitrolDiscontinuedDiscontinued
Keeprite$2,090 - $5,240$3,650 - $6,700
Lennox$3,160 - $7,230$4,750 - $10,780
Luxaire$2,610 - $6,020$4,590 - $9,580
Maytag$2,310 - $5,580$4,490 - $10,070
NordyneDiscontinuedDiscontinued
Payne*$1,950 - $3,920$3,910 - $6,770
Rheem$3,460 - $6,660$4,730 - $9,410
Ruud$3,460 - $6,590$4,700 - $9,300
Tempstar$2,130 - $5,240$3,590 - $6,820
Trane$3,370 - $7,440$4,360 - $20
York$2,590 - $5,980$4,440 - $9,620
*Aire Flo, Ducane, Gibson, Payne and a few other brands make a limited range of basic ACs.

See costs in your areaEnter Your Zip Code

Prices might vary slightly from page to page on Pick HVAC. This is because we consistently monitor and update AC prices to give you the most accurate numbers available.

Central AC Prices by Unit Size

If you know what size unit you have or need, this chart will help you narrow your cost.

We’ve included a rough idea of home size, but you cannot be sure of the size AC unit you need without a pro technician doing a load calculation, such as a Manual J, that measures 10+ factors including home size, style, construction materials, door/windows, climate and more.

Here are central air conditioner prices by size.

AC Unit SizeHome SizeEquipment CostInstalled Cost
1.5 tons600 - 1000 sf$1,880 - $3,460$2,840 - $4,620
2.0 tons1001 - 1300 sf$2,260 - $4,290$3,410 - $5,740
2.5 tons1301 - 1600 sf$2,700 - $5,090$3,610 - $6,700
3.0 tons1601 - 1900 sf$3,050 - $5,830$4,590 - $7,930
3.5 tons1901 - 2200 sf$3,400 - $6,560$4,860 - $8,970
4.0 tons2201 - 2600 sf$3,470 - $7,020$5,060 - $9,360
5.0 tons2601 - 3200 sf$3,820 - $7,590$5,750 - $11,170

Central AC Installation Cost and Extras

How much does it cost to install a central air conditioner?

$1,400 – $3,500 | Central Air Conditioner Installation Cost for Labor

This cost is based on many factors including:

  • Brand name – Carrier and Bryant cost more than Heil and Day & Night even thought the equipment is nearly identical and all brands are owned by United Technologies Corporation (UTC)
  • Difficulty of the installation
  • Distance from the condensing unit (outdoor unit) to the indoor coil
  • Size of the AC unit and coil – more refrigerant is needed for larger systems, and refrigerant is expensive
  • Who you hire (general AC installer or brand-certified installer)
  • Size of the installation company (smaller companies with less overhead sometimes charge lower rates)
  • Where you live – Cost of living in your area will affect AC installation cost

This price includes everything – removing old AC equipment, if needed, setting the new condensing unit, installing the new indoor coil, replacement of the refrigerant lines and topping off the system with refrigerant if necessary.

Itemized AC Installation Costs

Here’s a breakdown of costs associated with the installation of a new or replacement central air conditioner. As noted, refrigerant line, refrigerant and indoor coil are included in the above costs.

The prices below show where your money is going – or where you might need to spend extra money for system components like a condensing unit pad, ductwork, thermostat or zoning controls.

Brand New Ductwork: If your house has never been installed with an HVAC system before, you need to pay extra money for it.

$2,000-$4,000 | Quality R-6 insulated ductwork

Related Article: HVAC Ductwork Cost Guide

Condensing unit pad: Most installers won’t put a condensing unit directly on the ground, so a pre-fab pad can be used or a concrete slab can be poured.

$20-$150 | Condensing unit pad

Refrigerant lineset: There are two lines. One carries refrigerant from the coil in the condensing unit to the indoor coil; the second returns the refrigerant to the outdoor coil. Linesets from 20 to 50 feet are produced; length affects cost.

$120-$400 | Refrigerant lineset

Evaporator coil: This indoor coil can be a cased coil that installs on top of your furnace or an uncased coil that installs in the furnace cabinet. The indoor coil, known as the evaporator coil, collects heat from the air circulating over the coil. The heat transfers into the refrigerant, and it is carried to the outdoor coil where it is released. As heat is removed from the air, the indoor coil gets cold enough to condense moisture. Drier air in summer is more comfortable. The condensed moisture is collected in a drain pan. The evaporator coil must be sized to the capacity of the central air conditioning system.

$175-$500 | Uncased evaporator coil

$225-$575 | Cased evaporator coil

Thermostat: If your new central air conditioner or complete HVAC system has features the old one didn’t, you’ll probably need to replace your thermostat. You might want to do this anyway if you currently don’t have a programmable or Wi-Fi thermostat that allows you to monitor and control your heating and cooling using your smartphone and an app.

$12-$100 | Non-programmable thermostat

$15-$124 | Basic programmable thermostat

$135-$500 | Wi-Fi programmable thermostat

HVAC Zoning Controls:

The cost of zoning system is typically around $2,000 to $3,500 depending on the number of zones. For more information, read our HVAC Zoning System Cost Guide.

Other HVAC Optional Add-ons: There are a couple of optional add-ons you may have heard of. Those of you, who are interested in them, can take a look at:

What Size Air Conditioner Do I Need?

Getting the right size ac unit is essential to your indoor comfort and to the durability of the system. An AC unit that is too small will work too hard and might not cool the space effectively. This will also lead to premature mechanical failure. A unit too large will over-cool your home, creating temperature swings. The unit might also short-cycle, a malfunction that can destroy an AC compressor in the condensing unit.

Before having a Manual-J calculation made, you can get a pretty accurate estimate of the size unit you’ll need with the following information.  First, find your location on this US Climate Zone map below.

Image Source: basc.pnnl.gov

The hotter your climate is, the more cooling power you’ll need per square foot of your home. This is a quick reference:

  • Zones 1 & 2 (hot): 22-30 Btu/sq. ft.
  • Zone 3 (warm): 20-24 Btu/sq. ft.
  • Zone 4 (moderate): 18-22 Btu/sq. ft.
  • Zone 5 (cool): 16-20 Btu/sq. ft.
  • Zone 6 (cold): 14-18 Btu/sq. ft.
  • Zone 7 (very cold): 12-16 Btu/sq. ft.

To give you an idea of how these numbers might translate into your home, let’s turn them into central AC unit sizes for an average house of 2,000 square feet in each of the climate zones:

  • Zones 1 & 2 (hot): 2,000 x 24-30 = a 44,000 to 60,000 Btu (4.0-5.0 ton)
  • Zone 3 (warm): 2,000 x 20-24 = a 40,000 to 48,000 Btu (3.5-4.0 ton)
  • Zone 4 (moderate): 2,000 x 18-22 = a 36,000 to 44,000 Btu (3.0-3.5 ton)
  • Zone 5 (cool): 2,000 x 16-20 = a 32,000 to 40,000 Btu (2.5-3.5 ton)
  • Zone 6 (cold): 2,000 x 14-18 = a 28,000 to 36,000 Btu (2.0-3.0 ton)
  • Zone 7 (very cold): 2,000 x 12-16 = a 24,000 to 32,000 Btu (2.0-2.5 ton)

The range in sizes is the result of factors related to your home’s construction. In short, homes with more insulation, energy-efficient windows and doors and light-colored roofing need fewer Btu’s of cooling.

Summarizing the sizing of a central air conditioner, keep in mind:

  • A home in a cool climate requires a smaller central air conditioner than the same home would need in a hot climate
  • A replacement AC should be smaller if the home’s insulation has been upgraded or other energy-efficiency modifications have been made
  • A replacement AC should be larger if additional space, such as a finished basement or converted garage, is to be air conditioned

What Efficiency (SEER) is Right for You?

How efficient should your central AC be? If eco-friendly heating and cooling is the highest priority, then buy the most efficient system you can afford. Since the most efficient ACs are also the best performers, the answer is the same if superior indoor climate control and comfort is your goal.

When cost-efficient air conditioning of your home is what you want, finding the right balance between equipment cost and energy cost is the key. Referring to the Climate Zone chart again:

  • Zones 1 & 2 (hot): 18 SEER and up
  • Zone 3 (very warm): 17-18 SEER
  • Zone 4 (warm): 16-18 SEER
  • Zone 5 (moderate): 15-16 SEER
  • Zone 6 (cool): 15-16 SEER
  • Zone 7 (cool): Up to 15 SEER

The above SEERs are roughly estimated. We also developed a SEER Savings Calculator to help find a better balance between equipment cost and electricity cost.

There are a few more factors to consider.

Moist air is harder to cool, so if high humidity is common in your area, then getting a more efficient AC Units will reduce energy costs and make your home more comfortable.

The longer you intend to live in your current home, the more cost-effective a very efficient central air conditioner will be because its higher cost will be recouped when spread over more years.

If you plan to sell soon, you won’t get the long-term energy cost savings of an efficient air conditioner. However, keep in mind that some potential buyers will want to know how efficient your AC is, especially in warm and/or humid parts of the country.

Best Central Air Conditioner Reviews by Brands

hvac-brands-horizontal

Related Article: Best Central Air Conditioner Brands 2021

Note: Before you dive into brands/companies reviews, we strongly recommend you spend 70% of your research time on finding a qualified contractor. HVAC system is not a traditional appliance and most brands are reliable.

You may be also interested in the brand’s comparison posts:

Checking Contractor’s Background

Actually, 80% of repair problems are caused by bad installation instead of bad brands or units. Checking a contractor’s background is essential to ensure skill, experience, good reputation and certification.

Start by checking whether the contractor is certified by a trade organization such as the HVAC Excellence or North American Technician Excellence. To check their reputation, the Consumer Affairs Office and the Better Business Bureau are good sources of information such as complaints. For more information, you can read 6 Hacks Of Choosing an HVAC Contractor

Submitted AC Unit Cost and Reviews

ModelPriceHome LocationHome Size
Trane XL18, 5 ton$11,500Eatonton, GA2100 sq ft
New larger return, remove manufactured home system & block, new thermostat, new wiring and breaker. 0% financing and military discount.
Trane XR16$5,475Stuart, Florida1935 sq ft
Air handler and ac outside replacement 3.5 ton outside unit and variable speed air handler
Trane XV18, Trane XC80$21,400Allen, TX4600 sq ft
2 systems. XV18 5 ton variable speed a/c. XC80 2 stage 100000 BTU 5 ton variable speed furnace. Trane 5 ton cased coil. Trane ComfortLink II XL 1050 thermostat. Includes: emergency drain pan, drain switch, thermostat, A/C pad, driers, acid scavenger. New plenum and combo box with Honeywell media filter. 2 additional 12x10 returns. Standard Trane Warranty. Dealer's free 5 year bi-annual maintenance. 10 hour, 2 crew attic installation. Removed old systems.
Carrier comfort series 24AAA5$13,000(Include Ductwork)Chatsworth, CA2350 sq ft
LA County must have Ultra low NOX furnaces. This includes new ducting in the attic and they will wrap the metal fiberglass wrapped ducting in the garage to make it look nicer. Also includes the iwave R air purifier. I had 5 estimates with LENNOX topping out at 18k. Only one company was slightly lower but they quoted me on an 80k BTU furnace and I currently have 100k. The company I went with is a family owned company that appears to be very professional. Install is scheduled next week. Everything is Carrier including the thermostat. They originally quoted 14188 but I offered 13k and they agreed. My current LENNOX unit is 41 years old and still blows cold but every summer we cross our fingers that it does not go out and finally decided its time. If this new one lasts 20 years I will be happy and 81 years old.
Carrier Performance 14 Compact 24AHA4$7,500San Diego2017 sq ft
The price including the following items:
Condenser Carrier 24AHA448 Left wing of the house Condensing unit, slim line, up to 15 SEER 4 ton
Furnace Carrier 58SB1A090E2116 Garage Comfort 80% , Single Stage Heating , ECM Blower Motor
Evaporative Coil Carrier CNPVP4821ALA Garage Evaporative coil, high efficiency
Lennox ML14XC1-041$4,139Boca Raton, FL1600 sq ft
Original cost was $4,987. Instant rebate of $698 for payment in cash. Utility rebate $150. Although the salesperson indicated that the water pump was included, it was not included in the sales contract. However, there were issues and delays during the installation and we got the water pump "for free". The condenser was damaged. Lennox did not have the replacement part or another condenser. We got the condenser the following day.
Lennox XC20$15,534Mesa AZ1753 sq ft
4 ton Lennox Xc20 and furnace SL280 with s30 thermostat and one new duct to master bedroom
Amana ASX16-048-1F$4100 Installed w/ evap coreMississauga, Ontario3500 sq ft
19 year old Amana RCC42A2B 12 SEER condenser had broken down. The cost of repair (replacement of cracked and now discontinued condenser coil) was quoted to be 3 week lead special order at 50% of the newer and 20-22% more efficient 16 SEER unit. Evaporator core in the airhandler (furnace) had to be replaced because the old system was running on R-22 refrigerant and all new ones run on R-410A. Looked at perfectly matching Lennox unit EL16XC1 (and it came in at 5.3% cheaper), however, based on existing relationship with local Amana dealer decided to stay with the brand and it's newer product line for their post sales customer support and fast emergency service response times.
American Standard Silver 15$4690.00 PLUS TAXPORT TOWNSEND, WA.1530 sq ft
Included air handler, american standard model tem6aob30
Armstrong 4SCU14$5150 installed with separate gas heat unitGardendale, AL1700 sq ft two story (850 sq ft per floor)
Replaced a 30y/o Rudd unit on 6/1/19 with this Armstrong unit based on Consumer Reports reliability ratings and local HVAC guys recommendation. Already have had to replace the inside coil due to Dirty Sock syndrome (caused by using recycled aluminum to build the coil cheaper-bacteria builds up on the coil easier due to the porous nature of it) and then the compressor fan failed about a month ago. So two warranty issues in less than a year. It does cool well but is somewhat noisy compared to my Rheem unit that I still have for 2nd floor. Now looking to replace my Rheem unit due to age but probably going to spend the extra and go Trane.
Daikin 3-ton 16 seer (DX16SA0371)$11,000.00Norwalk CA1200 sq ft
First time install for this house without any HVAC before. Full install.
Day & Night FEM4x4800BL$11,000(Include Ductwork)Costa Mesa2000 sq ft
2 phase. Current house at 958 sq feet to then expand when we finish remodel to 2000 sq feet. includes all new duct work and brand new installation (no old unit). they are replacing a Split. Also, the attic is short which make install difficult. 9000 for phase 1 and 2000 more when they come back in 1-2 years to get the rest of the new build of house
Goodman GSX14$8,200(Include Ductwork)Slidell2330 Lower + 2500 Upper
New Construction of a 2 unit duplex, upper and lower. Seperate systems and ductwork.
Payne PA15NC 4-ton$4,500Brentwood,CA1810 sq ft
This is to replace my 18 years old Trane XL14i outdoor condenser unit only.I kept the old American Standard evaporator coil and Trane furnace, because dealers charge $2000+ for a new coil and another $2000-3000 for furnace replacement.The technician came to cut the old unit off and haul it away, install new unit, braze the 2 lines, do linesets flush and Nitrogen pressure check, vacuum the air out from the system, release the factory pre charged N410A into the coil and add more according to the line length.It runs quietly,much smaller than my old one, so far so good, I don't expect this could last for 18 years, 12-15 years would be appreciated.
York PHE4824$6,900Pioneertown2000
Unit is on the roof. Need a crane to replace the existing one (25-28 years old)
This table is based on local customers feedback and online submitted information, we will update this table every 3-6 months to keep this up to date. Last Update: Jan 2021

 

How to Get the Best Air Conditioner Prices

  • Firstly, keep in mind that installation quality is always the most important thing for residential HVAC project. So never sacrifice contractor quality for a lower price.
  • Secondly, remember to look up the latest rebates as we talked above.
  • Thirdly, ask for at least 3 bids before you make the decision. You can click here to get 3 free estimates for your local contractor, and this estimate already takes rebates and tax credit into consideration and filter unqualified contractors automatically.

Lastly, once you chose the right contractor, remember to use the tactics from this guide: Homeowners Tactics When Negotiating with HVAC Dealer to get the final best price.

Are you in the market for a complete HVAC system? See our Heating and AC Unit Combo Prices or Gas Furnace Cost for complete information on heating.

Sours: https://www.pickhvac.com/central-air-conditioner/

Most Reliable Central Air Conditioning Systems

Over the past months, with folks working and studying at home, homeowners began to appreciate their central air conditioning systems more than ever.

In fact, 14 percent of the members we surveyed about their AC systems said they used theirs much more than they had the previous summer and well over 80 percent said they used theirs just as much or slightly more. Of these, 15 percent had purchased a central AC system for the first time.

Installing or replacing a central air conditioning system is one of a homeowner’s biggest expenses, so you’ll want to get it right. Because there are so many variables, including a home’s size and design, how the system is installed, and construction of the ductwork, Consumer Reports doesn’t test central air conditioning systems. Instead, we estimate the reliability of major brands on the market by asking our members about their experiences with the central AC systems they have purchased and had installed.

In our latest central air conditioning survey, our members told us about the 23,997 central air conditioning systems they had installed between 2005 and 2020. They let us know which parts break and what it cost to fix their central AC if repairs were needed. We also asked them how likely they are to recommend their system to friends and family, and use their responses to calculate owner satisfaction ratings.

“Choosing a brand with higher predicted reliability and better owner satisfaction will boost your chances of getting an air conditioning system that you can depend on,” says Simon Slater, associate director of survey research for Consumer Reports.

Members expect their central air systems to last for a median of 15 years. Our findings are based on central air conditioning systems that are used a median of five months a year. Here are the details.

Using the information provided by our members, we calculated ratings for both predicted reliability and owner satisfaction. Of the 21 brands captured in our survey only one, Trane, earned an Excellent mark on both measures.

To calculate predicted reliability, we used our survey data to estimate how likely a system is to break or cease to sufficiently cool a home by the end of the eighth year. In addition to Trane, Armstrong and Ducane earned an Excellent reliability rating. Seven other brands earned a favorable rating of Very Good; and seven brands earned a rating of Good, which is just average.

In this survey, no brand earned a Poor reliability rating, but Coleman, Goodman, Luxaire, and York received a subpar Fair rating. People should take this into account if they’re considering buying a central AC system from one of these brands.

Our owner satisfaction rating is based on the percentage of members who say they’re extremely likely to recommend their central air brand. Five brands got a top rating of Excellent for satisfaction, including Trane, American Standard, Bryant, Lennox, and Carrier. Armstrong and Ducane earned Very Good satisfaction ratings, as did Rheem and Ruud. The other 12 brands earned a rating of Good (average) for owner satisfaction. (None received a Fair or Poor rating.)

So what breaks most often? According to our survey, the evaporator coil, which resides in the indoor unit, is the part most likely to break, affecting 5 percent of owners, on average. The three brands affiliated with Johnson Controls (Coleman, Luxaire, and York) stand out for having evaporator coils that are comparatively more problematic, with a problem rate of 10 percent.

Next are problems with condenser coils (outdoors), followed by blowers, compressors, and controls (excluding the thermostat). Issues with fans and valves were reported in fewer numbers.

Of the central AC systems covered in our survey, we predict that 36 percent will break or experience problems by the end of the eighth year of ownership. In our 2018 survey the median cost of a repair was $250 when paid completely out of pocket, vs. a median of $5,700 to get a new system installed (a figure confirmed in our 2020 survey). However, our 2018 survey also showed that less than half of the repair work was paid out of pocket—among our members, repairs are usually covered by a warranty or a service contract.

Manufacturers of central air conditioning systems recommend that owners have them serviced by a professional at least once a year, and 56 percent of our members do. Numbers drop dramatically after that, with 21 percent having their system serviced every two or three years, 8 percent reporting less than every three years, and 15 percent reporting that they never had routine maintenance.

We dug deeper into what our members consider when they say they are extremely likely to recommend their central AC systems to friends and family. How quietly it runs is first on the list, followed by how quickly the AC cools and how reliable it is. Comfort level, ease of use, and cooling evenly also contribute to satisfaction but not as heavily.

At the brand level, we found that Trane stands out for quietness, quick and even cooling, and comfort. Members also gave props to American Standard for even cooling. But owners of Payne systems weren’t particularly impressed, saying they were too noisy and failed to provide the level of comfort they expected.

The next AC: Owners of central air systems are very unlikely to switch to another type of air conditioning if their current system needs to be replaced. When we asked our members to rate the importance of certain features when considering the next system they’ll buy, well over half, 56 percent, said a 10-year manufacturer’s warranty was very important. More than 40 percent would especially like a new system that is more energy-efficient than the one they have now. Price was near the bottom of the list of important features, with only 9 percent looking for a system that costs less than the one they have now.

Brand loyalty: Only 15 percent of our members said that buying an AC system of the same brand is very important to them, but 25 percent of Trane owners indicated that it was key for them. Owners of American Standard systems are also more likely to be brand loyal than most others. Owners of systems from Heil appear to be the least.

Even if you buy the most reliable air conditioning system, it can let you down if you don’t tend to some regular maintenance. Some tasks require a professional, but others you can do yourself.

Keeping it clean: Be sure hedges and plants are at least 2 feet away from the outside unit. Clean grills and filters monthly. Clear debris and dirt from condenser coils, and check for blockages in the drain pipe.

Sealing and insulating ducts: Up to 30 to 40 percent of energy can escape through air leaks or when ducts aren’t insulated. Sealing them will keep you cooler in summer and warmer in winter.

Seasonal checks: Once a year, have a licensed professional change all filters, clean and flush the coils, drain the pan and drainage system, and vacuum the blower compartments. The contractor should also check that the system is properly charged with refrigerant, that there are no leaks, and that all mechanical components are working properly.

Source: Results are based on Consumer Reports’ 2018 and 2020 Summer surveys of owners of 23,997 conventional central air conditioning systems. Our statistical model estimates breakage rates (a system breaks down or ceases to sufficiently cool a home) by the end of the eighth year of ownership for systems that are not covered by an extended warranty or service contract. We also adjust for the number of months the system is used over a 12-month period. The median number of months during which these systems are used among our members is five per year.


Mary H.J. Farrell

Knowing that I wanted to be a journalist from a young age, I decided to spiff up my byline by adding the middle initials "H.J." A veteran of online and print journalism, I've worked at People, MSNBC, Ladies’ Home Journal, Good Housekeeping, and an online Consumer Reports wannabe. But the real thing is so much better. Follow me on Twitter.

Sours: https://www.consumerreports.org/central-air-conditioning/most-reliable-central-air-conditioning-systems-a5246005663/
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As you decide on the best central air conditioner brand for your home and budget, there are many factors to think over. The home ac units you’ll consider will differ based on your needs.

If you’re ready to invest in a high-quality hvac system for your forever home, you may explore different brands than if you’re replacing a unit at a rental income property. Your investment will create years of comfort and increase your home’s value.   

Our goal is to help you evaluate the best ac brands of 2021 and decide which would best fit your needs. We’ll explain why we like the brands listed below and introduce you to hvac units that have received top reviews from homeowners.

Best Air Conditioner Brands

  • Trane – Best for Quality
  • Amana – Best Value
  • Carrier – Best for Reliability
  • Lennox – Best for Efficiency
  • Rheem – Best Warranty
Air Conditioner

Here’s an overview of the best central air conditioner brands of 2021 and why we picked them.

1. Trane

Trane Central Air Conditioners

Trane has been named America’s Most Trusted HVAC brand by Lifestory for seven consecutive years. Homeowners rely on Trane because of the quality and dependability of their products. Their HVAC units have a distinctive, sleek design, but the brand’s portfolio of equipment and systems extends far beyond home ac units. Customers also turn to Trane for ventilation and indoor humidity and air quality solutions.

  • Efficiency Rating
  • 14.5 to 22 SEER
  • Sound Rating
  • An average of 70 decibels
  • Price Range
  • $5,800 – $14,000
  • Our take: There are not many cons when you choose Trane. You get a great unit that lasts, but you’ll pay more for it. If you don’t live in a hot area, a Trane unit may not be worth the price and efficiency rating.
  • Types: 9 models from single-stage to variable capacity. A compact model will fit in smaller homes.
  • Advanced features: The TruComfort feature reduces humidity by running longer at lower speeds instead of shutting off to remove moisture from the air.
  • Warranties: Standard 10-year warranty that covers both parts and labor and a 12-year compressor warranty.
  • Customer satisfaction: Trane is rated as the second most reliable brand in the Consumer Reports survey.

Our Featured Trane Unit: Trane XR16

The Trane XR16 has a SEER rating of up to 17, providing energy-efficient cooling for your home. This Energy Star qualified unit offers up to 54% in energy savings and operates on a single stage cooling system. The installed cost for this Trane unit typically runs between $6,800 and $10,800. Your family will experience quality comfort with this Trane HVAC system.

2. Amana

Amana Central Air Conditioners

Michigan-based Amana has been manufacturing home AC systems since 1934. Amana central air conditioning systems are affordable, and the company emphasizes value and reliability with each of its units. Amana is most readily recognized for its systems being designed, engineered, and assembled in America.

  • Efficiency Rating
  • 14 to 24.5 SEER range
  • Price Range
  • $2,800 – $5,900
  • Our take: Ideal for hotter climates due to their higher SEER rating. The unit’s installation costs could be higher than other brands, offsetting the lower price point of the unit.
  • Types: Eight types including single to variable-speed models.
  • Advanced features: ComfortBridge smart home technology gathers the system’s performance data to automatically make adjustments and minimize energy use in a home.
  • Warranties: One of the best HVAC warranties of all brands. Besides the standard 10 year warranty, compressors come with a Limited Lifetime Replacement warranty.
  • Customer satisfaction: Most complaints on Consumer Affairs are about the warranty not being transferable or not covering the installation of covered replacement parts.

Our featured Amana unit: ASXC16

The Amana ASXC16 offers quiet performance and energy efficiency with a SEER rating of up to 17. This unit offers a two-stage compressor and a two-speed condenser fan motor for cooling that may save your family money each month on the energy bill. The installed cost for this Amana unit typically runs between $2,300 and $4,225. Experience years of reliable cooling comfort with an Amana ASXC16.

3. Carrier

Carrier Central Air Conditioners

Carrier heating and cooling systems have been around since 1902. The AC company houses its residential business headquarters in Indianapolis, Indiana. The brand builds reliable AC units for the multipurpose uses of today’s homes. Carrier is recognized for its testing of normal wear and tear to ensure the HVAC units that bear the Carrier logo keep your home comfortable well into the future.

  • Efficiency Rating
  • Up to 21 SEER rating
  • Sounds Rating
  • 49dB to 72dB
  • Price Range
  • $3,500 – $8,400
  • Our take: Carrier may be pricier but they require installers to be certified by the company, guaranteeing proper installation of your investment.
  • Types: Regardless of single-stage and two-stage models in the range, all our built with quality Copeland compressors so you can cool your home more precisely.
  • Advanced features: Carrier makes the quietest central air conditioners on the market thanks to their quality insulation and chassis.
  • Warranties: 10-year parts warranty.
  • Customer satisfaction: Considering Carrier has been in business for over 100 years, the company doesn’t have many complaints at the Better Business Bureau. Most were resolved.

Our featured Carrier unit: Comfort™ 16 Central Air Conditioner

The Carrier Comfort™ 16 Central Air Conditioner is part of the Comfort™ Series line from one of the best air conditioner brands of 2021. This unit offers cool air with up to 17 SEER rating and five standout features: efficiency, durability, environmentally friendly, quiet cooling, and a limited warranty. The installed cost for this Carrier unit typically runs between $2,700 and $4,700. Rest easy knowing Carrier Comfort™ Series air conditioners are covered by a 10-year parts limited warranty upon timely registration.

4. Lennox

Lennox Central Air Conditioners

Lennox was founded in 1895 in Marshalltown, Iowa. Now headquartered in Richardson, Texas, the brand is recognized for high-efficiency AC units in every price range. With more than 6,000 independent Lennox Dealers across the country, there’s likely to be an HVAC expert nearby to install one of the best AC units available. From smartphone compatibility to cool, clean air, Lennox leads the way in HVAC innovation to make indoor comfort available to everyone.

  • Efficiency Rating
  • Up to 26 SEER rating
  • Price Range
  • $4,700 – $10,700
  • Our take: Except for the XC25, other units are more expensive than similar competitor offerings. Considering the high price point, the warranty is disappointing.
  • Types: 11 models featuring two-stage or variable speed compressors for cooling your home more precisely.
  • Advanced features: The XC25 model has a 26 SEER for the lowest running cost of all units and an impressively low 41 dB noise level.
  • Warranties: The unit and parts are covered by Lennox for five years from installation. Select models have a 10-year warranty.
  • Customer satisfaction: Lennox is among the more reliable central air systems in Consumer Reports’ owner survey, with around 17 percent of owners reporting that their unit required service in its first five years.

Our featured Lennox unit: Elite Series® EL16XC1

The Lennox Elite Series® EL16XC1 is a single-stage cooling system that offers comfort and energy efficiency in one. The system has up to 17 SEER rating and provides quiet cooling for your entire home. The installed cost for this Lennox unit typically runs between $5,550 and $9,100. The outdoor unit operates seamlessly in extreme heat thanks to the Lennox® Quantum™ coil and the fortified aluminum alloy exterior allows the unit to handle the most severe weather conditions.

5. Rheem

Rheem Central Air Conditioners

Rheem Manufacturing Company was created in Emeryville, California, in 1925. The brand is best known for its water heating systems, but the expansion into air conditioning in 1970 quickly ranked Rheem as one of the best central air conditioner brands in the U.S. The systems are known to be efficient and affordable. The brand is strongly committed to creating products that are good for the environment and has made a 2025 commitment to design for zero waste.

  • Efficiency Rating
  • Up to 23 SEER rating
  • Sounds Rating
  • 55dB to 72dB
  • Price Range
  • $2,300 – $4,300
  • Our take: Rheem sells solid units at a middle price range. But the company doesn’t require certified installers, which may create issues if the unit isn’t installed properly.
  • Types: Three series of multi-stage and variable speed central AC units are their standard offerings. Other companies consider those features as premium add-ons.
  • Advanced features: EcoNet-enabled systems can be programmed and voice-controlled using Amazon Alexa.
  • Warranties: 10 years limited warranty on parts and compressors if you register your product within 90 days of purchasing.
  • Customer satisfaction: The most common customer complaint is about unhelpful customer service and problems which may be due to improper installation.

Our featured Rheem unit: Classic Series: Two-Stage RA17

Rheem offers efficiencies up to 17 SEER with the Classic Series: Two-Stage RA17 unit. This two-stage cooling system operates at either 67% or 100% to provide more precise temperature control, lower humidity and efficiency that helps you save each month on your energy bill. The installed cost for this Rheem unit typically runs between $2,300 and $2,800. Your family will enjoy cooling comfort in peace as the Rheem unit relies on a scroll compressor for efficient and quiet performance. 

AC Cost Calculator

The price of a new HVAC system can vary. Our Cost Calculator will help you create a price estimate for the ideal AC unit for your home so you have a starting point as you receive quotes from technicians.

Just tell us what you need and we’ll find the best dealer for your project.

Your email has been sent

Thank you for letting HVAC.com connect you with a certified contractor. A local specialist will contact you shortly.

Your HVAC.com estimate is $5,000 – $6,000

This estimate is based on current data and is not a guaranteed price. For accurate pricing contact a local HVAC pro.

Here are a few brands we recommend:

Trane

Founded over 100 years ago, Trane is a well-known provider of HVAC products systems.

Explore Trane furnaces

Lennox

Lennox specializes in innovative technologies that maximize efficiency and minimize noise.

Explore Lennox furnaces

Goodman

Goodman HVAC systems are proudly “designed, engineered and assembled in the U.S.A.

Explore Goodman furnaces

*Estimate is based on current data and does not represent a guaranteed price. For accurate pricing contact a local HVAC dealer.

Air Conditioner Buying Checklist

Determining the best HVAC unit for your home will require more information than just the price. A unit with a lower initial price may cost you more in repairs and utility bills down the road. Consider these important factors as you determine the best central air conditioner brands 2021 has to offer.

Home size

Manufacturers build central air conditioning units according to the size of the spaces they will cool. The term “size” is not about a unit’s dimensions but its ability to produce cooled air. There’s an art to choosing the right-sized unit so that you don’t buy one that’s bigger (and more expensive) than you need or is too small and has to work harder to cool your home. Your installation expert will help you decide which size is best for you.

Energy efficiency

A unit’s energy-efficiency rating will predict how much it will cost to operate. The higher the rating, the more efficient your system and the more you’ll save on your utility bill. Some common terms you should know are:

  • EER and SEER  Look for the rectangular yellow Energy Guide sticker or tag. EER (Energy Efficiency Ratio) shows how much electricity the system needs to run at 95°F outside and maintain 80°F with 50% humidity inside. SEER shows a unit’s efficiency as the temperature in your area changes each season. Modern HVAC units have a minimum rating of 13 and go up to a 26 SEER. The more efficient the air conditioning system, the higher the number. 
  • ENERGY STAR certification  ENERGY STAR is a voluntary program and the “trusted, government-backed symbol for energy efficiency” designed to help consumers know how much their unit will cost to run.
  • HSPF – Heating Seasonal Performance Factor measures the efficiency of a system’s heat pump. It measures a unit’s heat output, or energy consumption, over a typical heating season. Again, a higher number means greater efficiency.

Cost

There are a number of factors that go into the cost of an air conditioner, including size, labor, brand and installation. On average, central air conditioner costs range from $3,000 to $6,000.

Warranty

A good warranty will save you thousands in repairs over the life of the unit. Different parts may have longer or shorter coverage, so read the fine print. Look for a warranty with a term of at least 10 years or longer. A warranty that can transfer to the next homeowner is an attractive selling feature. Ask the dealer how to register your unit. Many warranties will not go into effect until the system has been registered through the manufacturer’s website.

Advanced features

Advanced features can add to your home’s comfort level and your personal convenience. Some features worth considering include:

  • Smart programmable thermostat(s).
  • A system with zones that can be individually controlled to adjust the temperature in different rooms.
  • HEPA filters to keep allergy-producing particles away.
  • A dehumidifier to keep moisture (and mold) under control.
  • Quality insulation for quieter operation.
  • Customer reviews

Websites like Consumer Reports and the Better Business Bureau provide customer reviews of different brands. These are good resources to see how a central AC manufacturer handles customer complaints and issues.

Installation

Installation is a very important element to consider. An improper install could void the manufacturer’s warranty or damage the unit. Look for an installer that’s certified by the company and offers a warranty on installation.

Frequently asked questions

What are the best central air conditioner brands 2021?

The best central air conditioner brands 2021 (based on many factors) include Amana, Carrier, Lennox, Rheem and Trane.

What is the best-rated air conditioner?

If you’re looking for the top rated air conditioning system, Lennox’s XC25 model tops the list in energy efficiency with a SEER rating of 26 — the highest rating on the market and double the minimum rating required of 13. Carrier offers the quietest range of central air conditioners on the market with a sound rating as low as 49 dB.

How do I choose an air conditioner for my home?

When choosing an AC system for your home, there are seven factors we cover in this guide you should consider: cost, customer reviews, energy efficiency, features, home size, installation and warranty.

Sours: https://www.hvac.com/air-conditioners/best/
A/C Pro® How To Recharge

Thread: Opinions on this estimate for an AC Pro-brand and Lennox Unit?

I think some of you misunderstand what the Costco program is. Costco doesn't sell you or install the equipment. They just have HVAC specialists in the area that they contract with and who get to participate in the rebate program. The estimate is from the independent HVAC dealer that has been in business for 36 years and actually seems to have a good reputation based upon Yelp, Google and Home Advisor reviews.

Also, everyone says we're getting ripped off, but this estimate was, by far, the lowest of now 6 total estimates we've gotten from other HVAC specialists in the area -- none of the others affiliated with the Costco program. I'm guessing that location plays a big role in costs? The cost of living in San Diego, where they are, is obviously high.

Sorry to be a complainer, but the one thing that makes this feedback difficult to... quantify is that the forum rules say we're not allowed to get price estimates through y'all, but the estimates we've gotten from 5 other HVAC specialists in the area are all higher than this one, yet, you're saying the lowest price one is ripping us off. Sorry if that makes me sound ungrateful -- I'm not -- I appreciate anyone taking the time to respond. But if we've got estimates from 6 different HVAC specialists in the area, all of them highly rated on Yelp, Home Advisor and Google, how do we find these mystery HVAC specialists who will apparently be able to install equivalent equipment for dramatically lower costs?

Sours: https://hvac-talk.com/vbb/

Ac who pro condensers makes

HVAC-Talk: Heating, Air & Refrigeration Discussion - Powered by vBulletin

  1. 02-06-2017, 06:28 PM#1
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    New Air conditioner install question

    So I had an HVAC guy come out gave me an estimate and i have accepted he uses ac-pro.com products which is Maytag and AC pro a re branded allied air owned by lennox.

    Is this a good brand to go with or i should have him install a more known brand like Bryant or Rheem or Trane.?

    it is a 1500Sqft single story house we are replacing everything even the ducting R6 3ton 14 seer

    this is the unit he s trying to install

    Any help would be appreciated.

  2. 02-06-2017, 06:29 PM#2
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    Choose the contractor over the name on the box.

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  4. 02-06-2017, 06:32 PM#3
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    3-Tons for 1500 may be overkill. Did you see the manual "J" load / loss calculations?

  5. 02-06-2017, 06:37 PM#4
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    Thread Starter
    Well he has good reviews on yelp and home advisor licensed HVAC contractor. We have a 40yr old furnace and a seer 8 lennox which is 25yrs old the lennox is 3 ton the furnace is 2.5 ton.

    I did not see the manual because he is going to install everything next Monday and Tue.

  6. 02-06-2017, 06:41 PM#5
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    Where are you? How much insulation? Lot of windows?

    I have no issue with the Allied products. Pretty similar to Lennox, same factories in most cases. Mexico on the low end.

    As was said, find the best contractor. WAY too many hacks out there.

  7. 02-06-2017, 06:47 PM#6
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    Thread Starter
    We have new dual pane windows 5 windows 3 sliding doors in So California. Unit and installation $ plus ac condenser re-location and new ducting.
    Last edited by beenthere; 02-07-2017 at 03:24 AM. Reason: Price

  8. 02-06-2017, 08:03 PM#7
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    Not good!

    Unit too big.

    Yelp, home advisor and at least in my area anyone can get a license with $'s

    We have members in SoCal. Give them time to tune in.

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  10. 02-06-2017, 08:23 PM#8
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    3 tons in SoCal with humidity might be ok. I'd like to see a heat gain done on your home to nail it down. Probably do not even need a furnace, so I'm assuming the new equipment is a heat pump?

    Is there a reason he is mixing manufacturers on the condensing unit (Nordyne) and ac pro for the airhandler?

  11. 02-06-2017, 09:41 PM#9
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    Thread Starter
    We have a 40 yr old furnace and he is installing a 50K ac pro furnace 3 ton 14 seer condenser and a 3 ton ADP 14 seer coil they all will be the same brand.

    So you think i should go with 2.5 ton I don't think .05 ton will make that much of a difference the house has 5 bedrooms i think 3 ton won't be too much but i could be wrong

    I think anything will be way superior than what we have.

    Warranty as follows

    3yr labor
    10yr parts
    10yr compressor
    10yr heat exchanger
    24 hr service
    1 yr unit replacement
    10yr furnace replacement

  12. 02-06-2017, 10:08 PM#10
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    Quote Originally Posted by akheroView Post
    We have a 40 yr old furnace and he is installing a 50K ac pro furnace 3 ton 14 seer condenser and a 3 ton ADP 14 seer coil they all will be the same brand.

    So you think i should go with 2.5 ton I don't think .05 ton will make that much of a difference the house has 5 bedrooms i think 3 ton won't be too much but i could be wrong

    I think anything will be way superior than what we have.

    Warranty as follows

    3yr labor
    10yr parts
    10yr compressor
    10yr heat exchanger
    24 hr service
    1 yr unit replacement
    10yr furnace replacement
    May want to look at that HX warranty again, nowaday typically it's a basic 20 years or a limited lifetime to the original owner. It does say they offer a limited lifetime HX warranty is available thou, so maybe you do only have a basic 10 year warranty.

    Maybe it's me but I did not see where you get a 10 year furnace replacement with the 80 % Air Pro Furnace or even the 95%
    Last edited by Bazooka Joe; 02-06-2017 at 10:38 PM.

  13. 02-07-2017, 06:20 AM#11
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    Who is Air Pro or AC Pro?

  14. 02-07-2017, 09:41 AM#12
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    http://www.acpro.com/furnaces/ Sorry meant to say AC Pro brand

  15. 02-07-2017, 10:54 AM#13
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    A contractor private labeling huh. I typed the link in before but the OP had a - in there so I got some Chinese looking website.

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- AC Pro

AC Pro Turns California Dreams Into Digital Distribution Dominance

Like most entrepreneurs, Dion Quinn’s dreams of owning his own business started as little more than a hope and a dream.

In the summer of 1985, from a garage in Anaheim, California, Dion Quinn drafted the budgets for his first company using an Apple II computer.

Thirty-four years later, his company, AC Pro, a family-owned HVAC distributor and manufacturer based in Fontana, California, employs 400 employees across 17 locations in Southern California and southern Nevada.

“At AC Pro, we’re working to create a company where everyone can succeed together,” said Dion Quinn, president, AC Pro. “We’re not just selling HVAC equipment and supplies, we’re building a partnership to develop our team members and help our customers succeed.”

Entrepreneurial Spirit

Dion Quinn never wanted to work for anyone other than himself. That was his goal for as long as he can remember.

“Since I was 18 years old, I’ve always wanted to go into business for myself,” Dion Quinn said. “Starting a business was my focus when I got my first full-time job out of high school.”

Sal Trujillo Sr. (left), co-founder, HASCO, and Marshall Scott (right), Riverside, California, branch manager, AC Pro, discuss the innerworkings of a product at the counter. - Distribution Trends

Sal Trujillo Sr. (left), co-founder, HASCO, and Marshall Scott (right), Riverside, California, branch manager, AC Pro, discuss the innerworkings of a product at the counter. Scott has been an AC Pro employee for 16 years.

In 1984, he met his wife, Petra. They married the next year. Very soon thereafter, the pair founded Mechanical Systems Insulation, a mechanical insulation contracting company. With a borrowed Datsun truck, the Quinns humbly ran the business out of a small garage. A year later, the company expanded its offerings and began offering duct insulations in large commercial/industrial applications.

Never one to keep the entrepreneurial genie bottled up for too long, Dion Quinn — along with his friend Bob Billiu — elected to start another company, Material Supply Inc., a heating and cooling supply company, in 1986. While both of Dion Quinn’s companies shared the same acronym, they were very different — one delivered services, and the other distributed supplies.

Through contracting and material sales, the entrepreneurs continued to gain industry knowledge and establish their businesses’ identities.

“My experience being a contractor for the first four years, working out in the field myself, helped us understand the needs of our customers,” Dion Quinn said. “We continually strived to make it easy to do business with us then, and that remains true today.”

By 1989, the Quinns decided to leave contracting behind and focused on their growing supply business. Soon after, they began fabricating sheet metal products, which paved the way for more growth.

The following decade spurred exponential expansion as new locations opened throughout Southern California and Nevada. Today, the company has a collective 250,000 square feet of manufacturing and warehousing space across both states.

“We’ve come a long way since our contracting days, and we’ve learned a lot over the years,” Dion Quinn said.

Digital Transformation

Dion and Petra Quinn’s son Blake Quinn grew up in the family business. In fact, AC Pro was the first place he visited upon leaving the hospital when he was born.

“My mom was the only one who processed payroll back then,” Blake Quinn said. “My parents had to make a stop at the office on the way home from the hospital.”

Jon Tillery (right), territory manager, AC Pro, tours a customer through one of AC Pro’s showrooms. - Distribution Trends

Jon Tillery (right), territory manager, AC Pro, tours a customer through one of AC Pro’s showrooms.

During summer or winter breaks from his studies at Biola University, Blake Quinn found himself doing anything from janitorial work to stuffing envelopes to working in the plant to sitting in on dealer meetings at AC Pro.

In 2009, he officially hired in as a territory manager, where he gained firsthand experience into what customers want from a supplier. In 2011, he was promoted to director of marketing, and in 2014, he became director of marketing and e-commerce.

Sensing the shift in the digital marketplace, Blake Quinn embraced his e-commerce title and began brainstorming what an AC Pro online storefront could potentially look like.

“We had never attempted anything like this before,” he said. “It ended up being so much more complex than I could have ever imagined.”

During the project’s infancy, Blake Quinn and his marketing/e-commerce team approached multiple platforms and agencies. While each had a lot to offer, none effectively checked all of the boxes the company desired. So, the team pondered the possibility of customizing an off-the-shelf solution. And that’s what they did.

After three years of trial and error, hundreds of product photo shoots, and the entry of thousands of product attributes, AC Pro debuted its online storefront in June 2016.

“Ironically, our first order was placed by a lady who I never expected to use a computer in this fashion,” Blake Quinn said. “She started keying in orders, kept keying in orders, and hasn’t stopped since.”

“Ultimately, we recognize that HVAC sales are going to occur online. This is something customers are going to use regardless whether we have a storefront or not. They’re either going to purchase from us or our competitors.”
- Blake Quinn, vice president, AC Pro

Customers shopping on AC Pro’s online storefront are able to search inventory across any of the company’s 17 branches and look up accurate, real-time pricing. All equipment is accompanied by photographs, which can be viewed in 360-degree angles. In-house templating allows contractors to match units to the components they’ll need for a comprehensive install or repair.

“We offer a complete system matchup,” said Blake Quinn. “For example, we help contractors match their horizontal, vertical, or plenum coils with specific condensers across multiple efficiency levels. We’ll offer a full system price and everything can be added to a shopper’s cart in one click. While this may take 45 minutes on other sites, it can all be completed in less than two minutes on our site. And, many of the smaller items available on our site can be delivered the next day.”

While the website is only two years old, it could be viewed as a mature platform in the HVACR distribution industry, which is largely still developing its digital storefronts.

“We have several patents; there’s a lot of proprietary things on the site,” Blake Quinn said. “We’ve written our own code, and our site is learning and getting smarter all the time. Our customers seem to really like it, as more and more of our orders are being done online every day.

“Ultimately, we recognize that HVAC sales are going to occur online,” Blake Quinn continued. “This is something customers are going to use regardless whether we have a storefront or not. They’re either going to purchase from us or our competitors. Manufacturers are filling orders directly through the Amazons of the world. We’re extremely proud of what we’ve been able to create in-house with our own team.”

Incredible Intangibles

AC Pro’s philanthropic efforts extend beyond its 17 branches.

In 2002, The Quinn’s started God’s Kids, a nonprofit organization that supports orphanages and feeding centers worldwide. More than 600 children in five countries are currently under the care of orphanages supported by God’s Kids. Children receive meals, shelter, clothing, medical attention, educational support, and other human necessities to help them live purposeful and hopeful lives.

Fontana, California-based AC Pro employs 400 individuals across 17 branches. - Distribution Trends

Fontana, California-based AC Pro employs 400 individuals across 17 branches. Collectively, the company owns and operates 250,000 square feet of manufacturing and warehousing space across Nevada and California.

“God’s Kids has set the bar for international orphanages by instituting standards of care,” said Dion Quinn. “When an orphanage enters into the God’s Kids’ network, the organization provides financial, strategic, and instructional support to these homes for their children.”

AC Pro’s exceptional efforts have garnered the attention of many. The company earned the Maytag Sales Performance Award in 2016, Affiliated Distributors HVAC Member of the Year Award in 2015, and the 2015 Emerson White-Rodgers Exceptional Sales Performance Honor in 2015, to name a few. The company’s exceptional growth also earned it a spot in the Inc. 5000 list of America’s fastest growing private companies in 2015.

Associates at AC Pro receive a number of benefits, including medical, dental HMO & Dental PPO in network, vision, company-paid life insurance, employee assistance program, vacation and sick pay, 401k, profit sharing, and more.

“When associates go on vacation, we have their email and ERP software shut down,” said Blake Quinn. “We don’t want them checking emails when they should be enjoying family time.”

This family atmosphere extends throughout the arteries of each branch and is evident in the testimonials provided by many of the company’s employees. 


“Personally, I believe this is the best place to work,” said Denise Endicott, director of accounting, who joined the company in 2003. “We are one big happy family, and just like a family, we support one another and encourage and stand beside each other in the good times and bad.”

Pat Hutchinson, director of purchasing, AC Pro Nevada, joined the company in 1994. She deems working for AC Pro a blessing.

“I have been here 22 years, and every day I thank God that I work for this company,” she said. “The owners treat their associates, customers, and vendors with respect. They value each and every one of us. I love AC Pro and everything it stands for. If every company was like this AC Pro, the world would be a much better place.”

Distribution Trends editor-in-chief, Herb Woerpel, visited with Blake Quinn, vice president, AC Pro, and toured several of the Fontana, California-based distributor’s warehouses and retail stores.

Publication date: 12/26/2018

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Sours: https://www.achrnews.com/articles/140319-ac-pro-turns-california-dreams-into-digital-distribution-dominance

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A/C Pro

In most cases, if your car air conditioner is blowing warm air, A/C Pro is the fast, easy way to fix it yourself and save money.

However, there are situations where you’ll probably need to take your car to a professional mechanic instead. A/C Pro won’t fix a broken compressor clutch, for instance, or replace a bad condenser coil.

So how do you know whether you need to go to a mechanic or use something other than A/C Pro? Below is a list of the situations in which you should not use A/C Pro.

Don’t use A/C Pro if:

Your car was built before 1994 and has never been converted from R-12 to R-134a.

AC-Pro-Chevy-IMpala

Photo Source.

This one’s going to be rare if the car’s been driven much, because if the A/C has broken down at any point in the past 20 years, it would have likely been converted to R-134a in the process of getting it fixed. However, if you do have an old R-12 system, you can’t use A/C Pro until it’s been converted to R-134a. (All cars built since 1994 will have R-134a systems, which is what A/C Pro is designed for.)

You drive a hybrid or electric car.

AC-Pro-Chevy-Volt-Hybrid

Photo Source.

This is because most hybrid cars (and all electric vehicles) use an electric A/C compressor, which requires a different type of compressor oil. A/C Pro contains compressor oil, but it’s the type used in regular belt-driven A/C systems.

It took less than two weeks for your A/C to go from cold to hot.

AC-Pro-Vent

A/C Pro seals small leaks in rubber A/C components, such as o-rings, gaskets, and hoses, which are what usually causes a system to become low on refrigerant. A leak is considered “small” if it takes at least two weeks for the refrigerant to leak out. If your A/C was cold yesterday and today it’s blowing hot air, you have a problem bigger than A/C Pro can fix.

Your compressor is running, but the A/C pressure is too high.

AC-Pro-Recharging-Compressor

Before adding A/C Pro, one of the first steps is to use the A/C Pro gauge (which can also be bought separately) to check the system pressure. The gauge measures the low-pressure (or suction) side of the A/C system. When the compressor is running, it should create suction and lower the pressure reading. (When the compressor is not running, it’s normal for the gauge to show a high reading.)

If the pressure is too low due to a lack of refrigerant, adding A/C Pro will bring it up to the correct range. However, if the compressor is running and the pressure is too high, that either means that the system has too much refrigerant or that there is a problem with the compressor. Keep in mind that the belt will be constantly moving, even when the compressor is cycled off. To be sure the compressor is running, watch the center pulley.

You’ve already added A/C Pro. 

AC-Pro-Super-Seal

Here’s the scenario: you recharge your system with A/C Pro and it works, making your air conditioner ice-cold. However, after a few weeks or months, the air from the A/C starts to get warm again. This indicates that you have a slow leak in a metal A/C component, since A/C Pro will have sealed any small leaks in the rubber components (which are more common). At this point, before adding any more refrigerant, you’ll need to seal the metal leak—which you can do using Super Seal.

If one of those five conditions apply, A/C Pro is currently not for you. However, if your car’s air conditioner is blowing hot air because it’s low on R-134a refrigerant, and it’s taken at least two weeks to get that way, A/C Pro can fix your problem and save you time and money.

If you have any questions, please contact us.

Sours: https://www.acprocold.com/shouldnt-use-ac-pro/


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