Nyt all purpose pie dough

Nyt all purpose pie dough DEFAULT

Pie Crust

Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour (150 grams)
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold and cut into cubes
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons ice water, as needed

Ingredient Substitution Guide

Preparation

  1. In a food processor, pulse together the flour and salt. Add butter and pulse until the mixture forms lima bean-size pieces. Slowly add ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse until the dough just comes together. It should be moist, but not wet.
  2. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gather into a ball. Flatten into a disk with the heel of your hand. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 2 days.
  • For the best results, use a high-fat, European-style unsalted butter like Plugra.
  • You can experiment with textures and flavors by substituting 3 to 4 tablespoons shortening, lard, beef suet, duck fat or an unsweetened nut butter, such as hazelnut butter, almond butter or mixed nut butter, for 3 to 4 tablespoons regular butter. All should be well chilled before using.
  • Or make a crispy cheddar crust, which pairs nicely with apple pie or savory pie fillings: Pulse together 1 1/4 cups flour with 3/4 teaspoon salt. Add 3/4 cup grated sharp cheddar; pulse until mixture forms coarse crumbs. Add 8 tablespoons chilled, cubed butter and proceed according to the directions above.
Sours: https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/448-pie-crust

Good for Almost Everything Pie Dough

Ingredients

For a 9-inch single crust:

  • 1 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • ¾ teaspoon salt
  • 1 ¼ sticks (10 tablespoons) very cold (frozen is fine) unsalted butter, cut into 10 pieces
  • 2 ½ tablespoons very cold (frozen is even better) vegetable shortening, cut into 2 pieces
  • About 1/4 cup ice water

Ingredient Substitution Guide

  • Nutritional Information

Preparation

  1. Put the flour, sugar and salt in a food processor fitted with a metal blade; pulse just to combine the ingredients. Drop in the butter and shortening and pulse only until the butter and shortening are cut into the flour. Don’t overdo the mixing— what you’re aiming for is to have some pieces the size of fat green peas and others the size of barley. Pulsing the machine on and off, gradually add about 3 tablespoons of the water— add a little water and pulse once, add some more water, pulse again and keep going that way. Then use a few long pulses to get the water into the flour. If, after a dozen or so pulses, the dough doesn’t look evenly moistened or form soft curds, pulse in as much of the remaining water as necessary. or even a few drops more, to get a dough that will stick together when pinched. Big pieces of butter are fine. Scrape the dough out of the work bowl and onto a work surface.
  2. Gather the dough into a ball, flatten it into a disk, and wrap it in plastic. Refrigerate the dough for at least 1 hour before rolling. (If your ingredients were very cold and you worked quickly, though, you might be able to roll the dough immediately: the dough should be as cold as if it had just come out of the fridge.)
  3. To roll out the dough: Have a buttered pie plate at hand.
  4. You can roll the dough out on a floured surface or between sheets of wax paper or plastic wrap or in a rolling slipcover. (I usually roll this dough out on the floured counter.) If you are working on a counter, turn the dough over frequently and keep the counter floured. If you are rolling between paper, plastic or a in slipcover, make sure to turn the dough over often and to lift the paper, plastic or cover frequently so that it doesn’t roll into the dough and form creases.
  5. If you’ve got time, slide the rolled-out dough into the fridge for about 20 minutes to rest and firm up.
  6. Fit the dough into the pie plate and, using a pair of scissors, cut the excess dough to a 1/4- to 1/2-inch overhang. Fold the dough under on itself, so that it hangs over the edge just a tad, and flute or pinch the crust to make a decorative edge. Alternatively, you can finish the crust by pressing it with the tines of a fork.
  7. To partially or fully bake a single crust: Refrigerate the crust while you preheat the oven to 400 degrees.
  8. Butter the shiny side of a piece of aluminum foil, fit the foil, buttered side down, tightly against the crust and fill with dried beans or rice or pie weights. Put the pie plate on a baking sheet and bake the crust for 25 minutes. Carefully remove the foil and weights and, if the crust has puffed, press it down gently with the back of a spoon. For a partially baked crust, return the pie plate to the oven and bake for about 8 minutes more, or until the crust is very lightly colored. To fully bake the crust, bake until golden brown, about another 10 minutes. Transfer the pie plate to a cooling rack and cool to room temperature before filling.
  • Storing: Well wrapped, the dough can be kept in the refrigerator for up to 5 days or frozen for up to 2 months. While the fully baked crust can be packed airtight and frozen for up to 2 months, I prefer to freeze the unbaked crust in the pan, and to bake it directly from the freezer — it has a fresher flavor. Just add about 5 minutes to the baking time.

Featured in: The Baker’s Apprentice: Banana Cream Pie. 

Adapted from "Baking From My Home to Yours" by Dorie Greenspan (Houghton-Mifflin, 2006)

Sours: https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1015570-good-for-almost-everything-pie-dough
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Flaky Pie Crust

Ingredients

  • 2 cups unbleached all-purpose flour
  • ⅜ teaspoon salt
  • ⅛ teaspoon sugar
  • 5 tablespoons salted butter, cut in several pieces
  • 6 ½ tablespoons unsalted butter, cut in several pieces
  • 3 tablespoons solid vegetable shortening
  • 3 tablespoons ice water (a bit more or less may be needed)

Ingredient Substitution Guide

  • Nutritional Information

Preparation

  1. Mix flour, salt and sugar.
  2. Using a processor, a pastry blender or your fingertips, cut the salted butter into the dry ingredients until the mixture resembles cornmeal. Add unsalted butter and shortening and cut them in until the lumps are the size of peas.
  3. If you have been using a processor, transfer the mixture to a large bowl. Sprinkle on the ice water a little at a time and toss with a fork until the mixture comes together in lumps and holds together when pressed. If necessary, add more ice water, sparingly. Avoid kneading the dough.
  4. Gather the dough into two balls, wrap each tightly in plastic wrap and chill for at least four hours.

Featured in: Food; American Pie. 

Sours: https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/3305-flaky-pie-crust
Make Beautiful Sourdough With Claire Saffitz - Try This at Home - NYT Cooking

All-Purpose Pie Dough

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups all-purpose flour
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold, cut into 1/2-inch cubes
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable shortening, cold
  • ¼ teaspoon of kosher salt
  • Yolk of 1 egg, beaten
  • 1 teaspoon cider vinegar
  • ¼ cup water, from 3/4 cup ice water.

Ingredient Substitution Guide

  • Nutritional Information

Preparation

  1. Using your fingertips or the pulse function of a food processor, blend together the flour, fats and salt until the mixture resembles a coarse meal. There should be pebbles of butter throughout the mixture.
  2. Add egg yolk and vinegar to 1/4 cup ice water and stir to combine. Drizzle 4 tablespoons of this mixture over the dough and gently stir or pulse to combine. Gather a golfball-size bit of dough and squeeze to combine. If it does not hold together, add a little more of the liquid and stir or pulse, then check again. Repeat as necessary.
  3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gather together into a rough ball. You want to be careful not to overwork the flour, but not too careful; the dough should hold together. Divide the ball in half with a knife or a pastry scraper, then divide each portion in half again, and again, to create eight portions. Using the heel of your hand, flatten each portion of dough once or twice to expand the pebbles of butter, then gather the dough together again in one ball. Divide this ball in half.
  4. Flatten each ball into a 5- or 6-inch disc and dust lightly with flour. Wrap the discs in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 60 minutes.

Featured in: Pie Fidelity. 

Sours: https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/12319-all-purpose-pie-dough

Dough nyt all purpose pie

Foolproof Pie Dough

Ingredients

  • 2 ½ cups unbleached all-purpose flour (12 1/2 ounces)
  • 1 teaspoon table salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 12 tablespoons cold unsalted butter (1 1/2 sticks), cut into 1/4-inch slices
  • ½ cup chilled solid vegetable shortening, cut into 4 pieces
  • ¼ cup vodka, cold
  • ¼ cup cold water

Ingredient Substitution Guide

  • Nutritional Information

Preparation

  1. Process 1 1/2 cups flour, salt, and sugar in food processor until combined, about 2 one-second pulses. Add butter and shortening and process until homogeneous dough just starts to collect in uneven clumps, about 15 seconds (dough will resemble cottage-cheese curds, and there should be no uncoated flour). Scrape bowl with rubber spatula and redistribute dough evenly around processor blade. Add remaining cup flour and pulse until mixture is evenly distributed around bowl and mass of dough has been broken up, 4 to 6 quick pulses. Empty mixture into medium bowl.
  2. Sprinkle vodka and water over mixture. With rubber spatula, use folding motion to mix, pressing down on dough until dough is slightly tacky and sticks together. Divide dough into two even balls and flatten each into 4-inch disk. Wrap each in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 45 minutes or up to 2 days.
  • Correction: December 9, 2012

    Because of an editing error, a headline for a recipe that accompanied an article on Oct. 14 about Christopher Kimball, the host of the TV show ‘‘America’s Test Kitchen,’’ referred imprecisely to the discoverer of ‘‘Foolproof Pie Dough.’’ It was developed by a test-kitchen team led by J. Kenji Lopez-Alt, not by Kimball.
Sours: https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/12852-foolproof-pie-dough
The Sponge Cake That Can Do It All With Claire Saffitz - Try This at Home - NYT Cooking
Melissa Clark

Pie is an iconic American dessert, and there are few kitchen projects as rewarding as baking one. The best pies start with a flaky homemade crust, which is a lot easier to make than some people fear. We'll teach you how to make it here. Then go off and explore our pie recipes — any filling can be paired with this crust, which is yet another reason to master it.

Before You Start

  1. You’ll need a 9-inch pie pan, a rolling pin and pie weights (or use dried beans).

  2. Your butter must be cold; even frozen butter works as long as you cut it into cubes before freezing.

  3. Be sure to factor in at least one hour to let your dough chill before rolling it out.

Pie Crust

  • YieldOne 9-inch single pie crust
  • Time15 minutes, plus chilling

Ingredients

  • 1 ¼ cups all-purpose flour (150 grams)
  • ¼ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 10 tablespoons unsalted butter, cold and cut into cubes
  • 2 to 4 tablespoons ice water, as needed

Ingredient Substitution Guide

Preparation

  1. In a food processor, pulse together the flour and salt. Add butter and pulse until the mixture forms lima bean-size pieces. Slowly add ice water, 1 tablespoon at a time, and pulse until the dough just comes together. It should be moist, but not wet.
  2. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gather into a ball. Flatten into a disk with the heel of your hand. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour and up to 2 days.
  • For the best results, use a high-fat, European-style unsalted butter like Plugra.
  • You can experiment with textures and flavors by substituting 3 to 4 tablespoons shortening, lard, beef suet, duck fat or an unsweetened nut butter, such as hazelnut butter, almond butter or mixed nut butter, for 3 to 4 tablespoons regular butter. All should be well chilled before using.
  • Or make a crispy cheddar crust, which pairs nicely with apple pie or savory pie fillings: Pulse together 1 1/4 cups flour with 3/4 teaspoon salt. Add 3/4 cup grated sharp cheddar; pulse until mixture forms coarse crumbs. Add 8 tablespoons chilled, cubed butter and proceed according to the directions above.

Rolling Out Dough

  1. Lightly dust flour onto a clean counter and onto a rolling pin. (Alternatively, you can roll the dough out between two sheets of parchment paper or plastic wrap; no flour required.)

    Put the dough on the floured surface and, using the pin, roll away from you, applying pressure evenly.

    Rotate the dough clockwise as you work so it’s uniformly thin and isn’t rolled irretrievably into the counter. Lightly dust the counter with flour as you work. But don’t overdo it with the flour. Too much flour all at once makes a tough crust.

    Continue to roll the dough in all directions until you have a 12-inch circle. (If your rolled dough doesn’t end up in a neat circle, you can trim it, and use the trimmings to patch up any rips, holes or bald spots.)

    Transfer crust to a 9-inch pie pan by gently rolling it up onto the pin, then carefully unfurling it into the pan. Fold over any excess dough. If you’re not making a top crust, then the crimp edges now.

    Prick crust all over with a fork, then chill crust for 30 minutes. Your crust is now ready to fill or blind bake.

Blind Baking

Blind baking is partially baking a pie crust before you add the filling, which helps keep the crust crunchy. After filling it, you return the pie to the oven to finish baking. It's a particularly good method for custard pies, like pumpkin and pecan, that are prone to sogginess. Blind baking can be done up to 24 hours before filling; cover the crust loosely with a dish towel and store it at room temperature.

  1. Begin with the chilled, rolled-out dough in the pan. Line the dough with parchment paper or foil. Fill the parchment or foil with pie weights, uncooked rice or dried beans. Transfer to a 425-degree oven.

    Bake the crust until it firms up, about 15 minutes. It will still be very pale at this point. Remove the parchment or foil and weights, then return crust to the oven to brown slightly.

    Bake the crust 5 to 7 minutes more, until pale golden brown. Let it cool on a rack before filling.

Top Crust

Custard pies don’t usually have tops, but fruit pies just about always do, and it’s something you can play around with. Start with any fruit filling you like, pile it into your pan, and then choose one of the top crusts, or the crumble, below.

    Lattice Top

  • To make a lattice top, you’ll need to double your pie dough if it’s not already a recipe for a double crust. Roll out the chilled dough and cut it into 1-inch thick strips.

    Place half the dough strips parallel to each other across the top of the filled pie. (Reserve some of the longer strips for when you weave the lattice.) The longest strip should be in the center of the pie.

    Flip up every other strip on the pie. Place another long strip perpendicular to the others across the center of the pie.

    Flip those strips back down, then flip up the other strips. Weave in a second strip of dough. Repeat process on one side, and then the other, until you have fully covered the pie with woven strips.

    Gently press lattice strip edges into the bottom crust, then crimp the edges to seal the top and bottom crusts together. Or, if you’ve blind baked the bottom crust, simply tuck in the edges of the lattice so the strips don’t hang over the side of the pan. Brush lattice all over with milk, cream or an egg wash (a mix of egg and water or milk) to encourage browning. You can sprinkle the top with sugar or cinnamon sugar if you like.

    Whole Top

  • To cover the top of the whole pie, you’ll need to double your pie dough if it’s not already a recipe for a double crust. Roll out the chilled dough, then lay it out over the top of the filled pie.

    Crimp the edges to seal the top and bottom crusts together. Or, if you’ve blind baked the bottom crust, simply tuck in the edges of the top crust so it doesn’t hang over the side of the pan.

    Slash the top of the pie with a knife to allow steam to escape. Brush top crust all over with milk, cream or an egg wash (a mix of egg and water or milk) to encourage browning. You can sprinkle it with sugar or cinnamon sugar if you like.

    Cut-Out Top

  • To make a top using dough cutouts, you’ll need to double your pie dough if it’s not already a recipe for a double crust. Roll out the chilled dough and use decorative cookie cutters (circles, leaves, etc.) to cut out shapes from the dough.

    If you haven’t blind baked the crust, use a paring knife or scissors to trim any dough that is hanging over the edge of the pan. The dough should be flush with the edge of the pan.

    Arrange a ring of cutouts around the outer edge of the filled pie (the cutouts should be touching the crust, coming flush to the edge).

    Continue adding cutouts to fully cover the top of the pie. You can overlap the cutouts (or not) as you see fit.

    Brush cutouts all over with milk, cream or an egg wash (a mix of egg and water or milk) to encourage browning. You can sprinkle the cutouts with sugar or cinnamon sugar if you like.

    Crumble Top

  • To make a simple crumble for a standard 9-inch pie, combine 3/4 cup (90 grams) all-purpose flour, 1/2 cup (100 grams) dark brown sugar, 1 teaspoon (5 grams) cinnamon, a large pinch of salt and 5 tablespoons (71 grams) softened butter in a large bowl.

    Use your hands to mix the ingredients together, pinching the mixture until large crumbs form. The crumbs should be on the larger side, a bit bigger than a lima bean. Do not make small crumbs.

    Scatter crumbs over the top of the pie. It is nice, but not necessary, to mound more of the crumbs in the center of the pie and fade them out toward the edges so that some of the filling can show.

Baking Tips

  1. Always bake a pie on a rimmed baking sheet to contain any overflow. A baking sheet also makes removing the pie from the oven easier.

  2. You can freeze a whole, unbaked fruit pie. Then bake it while still frozen, adding about 15 minutes onto the baking time. Do not thaw it first or you could lose flakiness in the crust.

  3. For the best-looking crimped crust, or to avoid having your crust shrink in the oven, freeze the unbaked pie dough before filling and baking (or blind baking). The colder your dough when you get it into the oven, the better it holds its shape.

  4. You can store your baked pie at room temperature, covered, for up to one day. After that, the crust will become irretrievablysoggy.

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Sours: https://cooking.nytimes.com/guides/3-how-to-make-a-pie-crust

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All-Purpose Pie Dough

2. Add egg yolk and vinegar to ¾ cup ice water and stir to combine. Drizzle 4 tablespoons of this mixture over the dough and gently stir or pulse to combine. Gather a golfball-size bit of dough and squeeze to combine. If it does not hold together, add a little more of the liquid and stir or pulse, then check again. Repeat as necessary.

3. Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and gather together into a rough ball. You want to be careful not to overwork the flour, but not too careful; the dough should hold together. Divide the ball in half with a knife or a pastry scraper, then divide each portion in half again, and again, to create eight portions. Using the heel of your hand, flatten each portion of dough once or twice to expand the pebbles of butter, then gather the dough together again in one ball. Divide this ball in half.

4. Flatten each ball into a 5- or 6-inch disc and dust lightly with flour. Wrap the discs in plastic wrap and place in the refrigerator for at least 60 minutes.

Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/2012/02/19/magazine/recipe-pie-dough.html


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