Montessori report card comments examples

Montessori report card comments examples DEFAULT

Report Card Comments & Phrases for All Subjects

Report Card Comments for Distance (Remote) Learning

Report Card Comments for Distance Learning
A selection of report card comments focused on aspects of student performance during distance learning related to pandemic school closures, including work habits, behavior, and success at transitioning to remote learning.

Report Card Comments by Grade

Report Card Comments for Kindergarteners
This list of 32 ready-to-use comments covers academics, personality and attitude, work habits, and social skills for kindergarten report cards.

Report Card Comments for Preschool
This list of 38 ready-to-use comments covers academic subjects, social skills, behavior, and time/task management for preschool report cards.

Report Card Comments by Subject

Report Card Comments for Academic Achievement & Improvement
Creative and applicable academic achievement/improvement comments and phrases to use while completing the report card process.

Report Card Comments - General and Handwriting
General and handwriting comments and phrases to ease the report card crunch. Easy to modify and tailor to individual students.

Report Card Comments for Language Arts & Reading
An assortment of report card comments and phrases focusing on reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.

Report Card Comments for Math
Suggested math report card comments and phrases to assist you at the end of every quarter.

Report Card Comments for Science
Science report card comments and phrase for student evaluation during the grading process.

Report Card Comments for Social Studies
Make the most of your report card writing time using these suggested comments and phrases for social studies.

Report Card Comments by Student Topic

Report Card Comments for Citizenship
Help parents and students understand how being a good citizen in the classroom enhances learning and community.

Report Card Comments - End of Year
Provide a fitting look back on the full year in the classroom with these comments and phrases. Appropriate for all grade levels.

Report Card Comments for Personality & Attitude
Comments and phrases appropriate for all students. Also a great resource to prepare for parent-teacher conferences.

Report Card Comments for Work Habits
A set of comments and phrases that can be used to address a student's work habits.

Report Card Comments for Character and Social/Emotional Traits
Help parents and students appreciate the development and importance of 21st Century skills and character traits.

Positive Report Card Comment Descriptions of Student Behavior
An extensive list of verbs and phrases that will help you to prepare positive, descriptive statements about a student's behavior.

Report Card Comments for Distance Learning
A selection of report card comments focused on aspects of student performance during distance learning.

Report Card Comments for ESL Students
This list of 30 ready-to-use report card comments covers language growth, speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills for ESL and ELL report cards.

Advice for Teachers

Advice for Parents

Sours: https://www.teachervision.com/teaching-strategies/report-cards-advice-suggested-comments

How Progress Reports Work in the Montessori Classroom

How Progress Reports Work in the NAMC Montessori Classroom

I know I’m not alone when I say that one of my least favorite tasks is writing progress reports. Montessori teachers take extra time to personalize each child’s progress report. If we are following the child, our progress reports must reflect the individual child’s progress. Many parents and teachers alike are unsure of how progress reports actually work in the Montessori learning environment.

Why write a progress report? How does the Montessori progress report differ from a traditional school's report card? NAMC has compiled some helpful information for the Montessori parents and teachers who want to know more about  progress reports in the classroom.

How Progress Reports Work in the Montessori Classroom


Purpose of a Progress Report

Progress reports record and assess each student’s academic and social development, as well as clarify goals.

Types of Progress Reports

There are two basic types of Montessori progress reports: the checklist format and the narrative-style report. The checklist format is a checklist of important work, skills, and lessons that the child could receive. The curriculum is broken down into specific areas, which are assessed by an evaluative key. These keys vary, but convey the sense that the material has been 1) presented, 2) practiced, and eventually 3) mastered. For the parent, a checklist seems to focus the attention on the key or “grade”, rather than on the child’s personal qualities and development. These record sheets are important for the Montessori teacher as she is able to record her observations and follow the progress of each child.

The narrative progress report is the most demanding for teachers, but as parents have shared with me time and time again, it’s the most rewarding for parents as they really gain a true feeling as to what their child is learning. The narrative progress report recognizes that each child is unique and whose development cannot fully be understood or assisted by using a checklist approach. It gives a more detailed description of the child’s work and choices of work. For both the parent and child, a narrative report assures them that “My teacher really understands and cares about me/my child.”

The narrative progress report also allows the Montessori teacher to address character development, something which is nearly impossible to do with a checklist. The development of independence, initiative, responsibility, confidence, social awareness, cooperation, concentration, helpfulness, and commitment to work is a crucial element of Dr. Montessori’s curriculum and ones that need the well-thought out use of words to convey.

The Language of Progress Reports: Keeping it Positive

Begin the report with positive comments. It is important for teachers to reflect upon and remember that each child, no matter how challenging, has good qualities. These qualities need to be brought to the forefront of the progress report. Parents are always happy to know that you think well of their child and it also helps “soften the blow” if there are some difficult situations to be addressed.

The language of progress reports should also model the language we use in our Montessori classrooms. Instead of saying “Don’t run!”, Montessori teachers say “Please use walking feet.” The same is true in progress reports. Instead of saying “Magda talks to her friends all the time”, we say “Magda is very social”. Instead of saying “Kevin consistently interrupts during lessons”, we say “Kevin is learning to focus his attention and listen during lessons”.

As a new Montessori teacher, this was the most difficult part of writing progress reports. Over time, it became second nature, but there are still times when I will ask a fellow Montessori teacher to help me re-phrase a delicate statement. I’ve put together some useful phrases to help you when it comes time to write your own progress reports.

Instead of Saying... Montessori teachers use...

Wanders from task to task/wastes timeIs learning to occupy his time more constructively
Short attention spanIs becoming more dependable during work periods
Not working to full potentialHas great potential and is working toward achieving it
Doesn’t follow directionsIs learning to listen to directions more carefully
Doesn’t maintain a clean workspace/materialsIs learning to take care of her workspace and classroom materials
Clingy/needyIs continuing to grow in independence
Is easily distractedIs learning to concentrate on her work
IrresponsibleIs developing his sense of responsibility
Doesn’t play fairIs learning to be more cooperative, careful, and fair

As each progress report becomes part of the student’s formal school record, and will be read by parents and future teachers, it is important for the teacher to treat progress reports as important documents. The most effective progress report is thorough and has a friendly feel to it. It discusses the student’s progress and personality in a way that only someone who truly knows and understand the student could convey.

Michelle Irinyi — NAMC Tutor & Graduate

As much as possible, NAMC’s web blog reflects the Montessori curriculum as provided in its teacher training programs. We realize and respect that Montessori schools are unique and may vary their schedules and offerings in accordance with the needs of their individual communities. We hope that our readers will find our articles useful and inspiring as a contribution to the global Montessori community.
© North American Montessori Center - originally posted in its entirety at Montessori Teacher Training on Wednesday, October 3, 2007.

Sours: https://montessoritraining.blogspot.com/2007/10/progress-reports_03.html
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It can feel daunting to write 15 to 20 report cards in one sitting. Be sure to maintain notes for each child on a weekly basis so you can write a thorough and helpful report card without struggling to remember specifics.

The Importance of Report Cards

Report cards help track a child's progress and let both the teacher and parents know what the child is excelling in and what they need to work on. Comments and observations can provide tremendous insight into the child's wellbeing and help foster a supportive network of teachers and family members.

Related Articles

Comments for Specific Subjects

Your subjects will differ depending on what your school emphasizes. Keep comments short, yet detailed and use as many templates as you need to explain the child's experience with each specific subject. You can write:

  • He/She seems to really enjoy (specific subject) and is excelling in (specific subject-related skill).
  • He/She seems distracted during (specific subject) as evidenced by (insert supporting behavior).
  • He/She seems to like learning about (specific subject or topic) and has been a pleasure to teach.
  • He/She appears to really like (specific subject) and could use some extra help with (insert specific topic).
  • He/She is very enthusiastic when (subject) is brought up and consistently participates during discussions.
  • He/She has come up with very creative answers during (subject) and I've enjoyed teaching him/her.
  • He/She has been a joy to have in class and especially excels in (enter several subjects if applicable).
  • He/She tends to get antsy during (subject) and may need a little extra help understanding (specific subject-related topic).
  • He/She loves listening to (insert subject topic) and actively shares his/her thoughts.
  • He/She has seems to enjoy (insert subject) and has a deep understanding of the material.
  • He/She shows advanced abilities in (subject) and would benefit from (insert recommendation).

Improvement Comments

Letting a parent or parents know what the child needs help with can accelerate their ability to find appropriate solutions. Doing so early on can help the little one improve upon necessary skills before heading to kindergarten. You can write:

  • It seems like (child's name) could use some help with (insert behavior or subject matter).
  • I've noticed that (child's name) consistently struggles with (insert behavior or subject matter) because he/she has been (give examples).
  • (Child's name) would benefit from some extra practice with (insert behavior or topic).
  • More often than not, (child's name) appears to have difficulties with (insert behavior or topic).
  • It would help (child's name) improve upon (skill or behavior) if it were practiced a bit more at home.
  • I've noticed (child's name) seems to struggles with (behavior). We will continue to work on this at school and it would be great if (child's name) could practice these skills at home as well.
  • (Child's name) seems nearly ready for (insert skill) but still could use some extra practice getting there.
  • (Child's name) could use a brush up on (skill or behavior).
  • There's been a few instances where I've seen (child's name) have a challenging time with (skill).
  • Although (child's name) has made great progress with (skill or behavior), he/she could still use some extra help understanding it a bit better.

Praise Comments

Praise comments can be really fun to write. Highlight what each child is doing well by writing:

  • (Child's name) is excelling in (list subjects) and consistently participates in class.
  • (Child's name) is eager to lend a helping hand and gets along with his/her classmates.
  • (Child's name) works well with others and is liked amongst his/her peers.
  • He/She has been a joy to teach and always comes to class with a smile.
  • (Child's name) is incredibly creative and consistently impresses me with his/her (skills).
  • (Child's name) consistently excels in (behaviors) and has been really fun to teach.
  • (Child's name) is smart, creative, and consistently kind to his/her classmates.
  • (Child's name) learns quickly and demonstrates (skills) at an advanced level.
  • (Child's name) has picked up (skills) very quickly and shows an eagerness to learn.
  • (Child's name) always participates in class and has great problem-solving skills.
  • (Child's name) handles misunderstandings well and is great at communicating.
  • (Child's name) does very well at identifying his/her feelings and communicating them in a calm, mature way.
  • (Child's name) shows an interest in learning new topics and consistently makes insightful observations.

Comments for Behavioral Issues

Although it can be tricky to write about behavioral issues on a report card, it is important information for the child's caregiver to understand. You can say:

  • He/She seems to struggle with sharing toys and learning materials with his/her peers.
  • He/She is working on raising his/her hand and has shown some improvement.
  • I've noticed (child's name) seems to have a difficult time following directions. This typically happens during (activity).
  • (Child's name) has had a challenging time keeping his/her hands to him/herself. This happens (amount) times a day.
  • (Child's name) is struggling to complete projects in entirety. This is something we will continue to work on in class.
  • (Child's name) tends to throw tantrums when (insert example). We are actively working on emotional expression with him/her.
  • (Child's name) has shown some aggression towards a few classmates during playtime. Examples of this include (insert examples). We are working on using words instead of touch.
  • During one occasion, (child's name) grabbed a toy from another child. Since then we have seen great improvement, but are still working on sharing.

Socializing Comments

Noting how each child interacts with their peers and adults can help paint a thorough picture for the child's parent. You can write:

  • (Child's name) tends to keep to him/herself and often prefers to observe his/her classmates.
  • (Child's name) loves to engage with his/her peers and plays well with others.
  • (Child's name) seems to struggle with connecting with his/her peers.
  • (Child's name) enjoys spending time with his/her peers and reports having a good time with his/her friends.
  • (Child's name) shares well with friends and gets along with everyone in class.
  • (Child's name) seems to have a hard time getting along with his/her peers.
  • (Child's name) has developed close friendships with several classmates and prefers spending time with one or two friends at a time.

Group Play Observations

Group projects or play can reveal a lot about a child's ability to collaborate with peers. On their report card you can note:

  • (Child's name) does well working with others and tends to take on a leadership role.
  • (Child's name) seems to enjoy collaborating with others during group projects.
  • He/She gets along well with others and is very interactive during group play time.
  • He/She tends to keep to themselves during group play time.
  • He/She seems to prefer listening to others' ideas during group projects.
  • He/She is typically withdrawn during group projects and tends to prefer playing one on one.
  • He/She listens to instructions well during group activities and follows through with the assignment.
  • He/She collaborates well with others and is respectful when his/her peers share their opinions.
  • He/She tends to struggle with group activities and usually prefers to spend time playing alone.
  • He/She reports liking group activities and thrives in this environment.

Leadership Comments

Although not all children tend to take on leadership roles, it can be helpful for parents to know which collaboration style their child tends to gravitate towards. On their report card you can say:

  • (Child's name) tends to enjoy being in charge during group activities and projects.
  • He/She shows great leadership skills, especially during (insert activity).
  • He/She tends to shy away from leadership roles and prefers to observe his/her classmates.
  • He/She usually takes on leadership roles but also seems to enjoy collaborating with others.
  • He/She actively participates in group activities and tends to take charge when offered the opportunity to do so.
  • (Child's name) demonstrates impressive leadership skills and is consistently respectful of other's opinions.
  • He/She has a take charge spirit and enjoys doing group activities.

Referral Comments

Because you spend so much time with each child, you may notice that a few may benefit from a referral. These can be included on their report card, along with some supporting examples. You can write:

  • (Child's name) seems to struggle with (specific) subject and would benefit from having a tutor provide a little extra help.
  • (Child's name) is having a hard time reading and writing and may benefit from an evaluation with a medical psychologist.
  • (Child's name) is struggling socially. Some examples of this include (give examples). You may want to consider contacting a child psychologist or therapist for an evaluation.
  • (Child's name) appears anxious throughout the day, especially during (mention examples). You may want to take him/her to a child psychologist or therapist for an evaluation so we can increase his/her comfort level. Let me know if you'd like to discuss this further or have any questions and I'm happy to help.
  • (Child's name) seems to have a mild reaction to (list food or beverage). It would be a good idea to consult with his/her pediatrician to make sure there isn't an allergy that we should know about.

Writing Useful Report Card Comments

Take your time writing each child's report card. Even though the task may feel tedious, remember that you are providing incredibly helpful and insightful information for the child and their family to build upon.

© 2021 LoveToKnow Media. All rights reserved.

Sours: https://kids.lovetoknow.com/childrens-education/preschool-report-card-comment-examples
Sample Report Card Comments

105 Report Card Comments to Use and Adapt

Just about every teacher agrees: report card comments are important to provide insights and next steps to students and families. But there are few who actually look forward to writing them.

Why?

Because every instructor knows working under tight deadlines to create upwards of 20 unique and detailed reports at the end of the year or term isn’t exactly straightforward (or particularly fun). That's especially true in the era of distance learning.

And while no one at your school knows your students better than you do, writing valuable report card comments for each of them can be a huge challenge.

That’s why we created a list of 105 sample report card comments — starters to help you find ideas, inspiration, and insights while writing your own report cards.

The 105 report card comments in this list will help you:

  • Instill a growth mindset in students
  • Build stronger home-to-school connections
  • Write stronger leads and use livelier language
  • Choose the right phrasing when writing positive and constructive report card comments

Report card comment starters

You'll notice that the report card comments below can act as a springboard for more fully developed ones. But don't worry, using them you'll be able to take some of these one-liners and turn them into insightful and actionable next steps!

For example, you'll be able to take a 1st grade number sense comment like "Your child is able to add and subtract numbers up to 20 using various manipulatives" and transform it into:

Your child is able to add and subtract numbers up to 20 using various manipulatives. This was evident when he was working independently to solve a real-world problem by adding toys in the classroom toy bin. As a next step, they should continue to add to larger numbers to encourage his skills. You can support him by asking him to add his own toy piles at home.

Or taking a responsibility-related learning skill comment from "Your child is able to take responsibility for her own actions both in and out of the classroom" to:

Your child is able to take responsibility for her own actions both in and out of the classroom. She often checks her agenda and day planner to make sure she has all of the necessary materials to complete work at home before leaving. During indoor recess, she takes time to tidy up everything she was playing with.

Notice the difference?

Compared to a single number or letter grade, report card comments can provide even more value to your students and their families. In other words, a number or letter or grade captures the what, while an accompanying comment captures the how.

Depending on the age group or grade level you teach, a letter or grade letter might be enough. However, research in Phi Delta Kappan, the professional journal for educators, suggests:

Comments that identify what students did well, what improvements they need to make, and how to make those improvements, provided with sensitivity to important contextual elements, can guide students on their pathways to learning success and ensure that all learn excellently.

Gather insights into student performance all year long and make report card writing easier with Prodigy, the adaptive math game that students love.

Learning skills (positive comments)

  • ________ is confident, positive and a great role model for his/her classmates.
  • ________ is frequently among the first to help and mentor other classmates. He/she is a valuable part of the classroom.
  • ________ has shown excellent ability to set goals and be persistent in achieving them.
  • ________ is interested in his/her own learning, listens attentively, and makes a solid effort to avoid distractions that could interrupt the learning process.
  • ________ is accountable and responsible. He/she makes smart decisions, admits mistakes and listens to opportunities to improve.
  • ________ relates well to classmates and is appreciative of different perspectives and experiences.
  • ________ manages his/her emotions maturely and responds to feedback appropriately.
  • ________ always looks for ways to be helpful in the classroom.
  • ________ is dependable and reliable, follows directions effectively, and follows through on his/her commitments to him/herself and others.
  • ________ is thoughtful, insightful and thorough in written and verbal communication, and has a talent for expressing his/her ideas clearly.
  • ________ works well with classmates in group work and often takes a leadership role.
  • ________ shows a positive attitude with classmates in group projects and activities, and both takes and gives suggestions and directions effectively.
  • ________ shows maturity when solving problems with classmates and uses good communication.
  • ________ excels at applying what he/she learns in the classroom to real-world and real-life situations.
  • It has been a pleasure to have _______'s enthusiasm, positivity and maturity in my class.
  • ________ is an enthusiastic member of the class and shows a willingness to learn.
  • ________ shows responsible behavior, works well with a group and shows appreciation for the efforts of classmates.
  • ________ is focused during classroom activities and willingly participated in class discussions.
  • ________ performs independent work with confidence and focus.
  • ________ works independently and takes pride in work done well.
  • ________ is focused in class and willingly participates in group discussion.
  • ________ is very conscientious and shows excellent effort and care with daily work.
  • ________ demonstrates a willing and conscientious effort in his/her daily work.
  • ________ shows a conscientious effort to learn.
  • ________ has done a great job facing and overcoming big challenges this year. Please continue to nurture and encourage this behavior over the summer.
  • ________ shows responsibility and follows directions whenever they are given.
  • ________ listens to and follows directions precisely and attentively.
  • ________ follows directions promptly and accurately.

Learning skills (needs improvement)

  • ________ is encouraged to demonstrate more responsible attitudes and behavior in the classroom.
  • ________ needs to show more appropriate behavior when interacting with classmates.
  • ________ needs to pay attention to the use of appropriate language at all times
  • ________ requires encouragement to listen attentively during group sharing times.
  • ________  needs to listen to directions more attentively during lessons.
  • ________ would benefit from showing a greater desire to contribute ideas in class.
  • ________ needs frequent reminders to be attentive during instructions and lessons.
  • ________ needs to improve his/her cooperation in group settings. He/she should work on voicing feelings and opinions and listening to others.
  • ________ needs to improve his/her work with others. He/she must ensure to accept a share of the work when participating in a group assignment.
  • ________ needs to improve on working independently and be sure to ask for assistance only when it is needed.
  • ________ often struggles to focus in class, which harms his/her ability to engage well with class activities and assignments.
  • ________ is encouraged to use time wisely to finish tasks in the time required.
  • ________ is encouraged to be more responsible in completing tasks without needing regular reminders.
  • ________ needs to show by the quality of work and use of class time that he/she is properly engaged in the learning process.
  • ________ consistently needs reminders to focus on time management.
  • ________ needs to follow classroom rules more closely throughout the school day.

Math (general comments)

  • ________ is having considerable difficulty with math. I recommend he/she work on studying ________ and ________. This extra practice will help him/her feel more relaxed when doing math in the classroom. Please contact me if you need materials to get him/her started.
  • ________ has a good understanding of all math concepts taught so far this year. He/she continues to turn in excellent assignments and especially enjoys hands-on math activities.
  • ________  has a positive attitude towards math but continues to have trouble in a few key areas. He should practice every evening at home. Areas that need extra attention are ________  and ________ .
  • ________  demonstrates a good understanding of all math concepts studied and communicates with clarity and good justification of reasoning.
  • ________ needs to work on increasing his/her speed in math facts. He/she should continue with daily practice with a focus on addition, subtraction, multiplication and division.
  • ________ seems to need continuous encouragement in math. He/she continues to struggle with basic math concepts for his/her grade level.
  • ________ is having a difficult time in certain areas of math. Areas in need of extra work are ________ . Working on these problem areas every night would help improve his/her learning outcomes.
  • ________ is struggling to keep up in math. He/she could benefit from practicing the multiplication table and should also continue to practice the long division process.
  • ________ is easily distracted during math lessons and behavioral issues are interfering with his/her learning. We will be working on more difficult subjects and he/she will struggle if he/she does not pay attention in class.
  • ________ is having trouble with math tests. He/she does well on assignments, but does not seem to retain information for tests. I always give a week’s notice before tests, so please be sure ________ studies and adequately prepares for them as they approach.

Addition and subtraction

  • ________ is able to calculate addition and subtraction facts to 18 with confidence and accuracy.
  • ________  is becoming more able to calculate addition and subtraction facts to 18 with confidence and accuracy.
  • ________  requires more time and practice in calculating addition and subtraction facts to 18
  • ________ needs to put more effort into learning to calculate addition and subtraction facts to 18.

Skip counting

  • ________  is able to skip count forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  is learning to skip count forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  needs practice with skip counting forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.
  • ________  needs considerable practice with skip counting forward and backward by twos, fives, tens, and hundreds to complete short patterns.

Place value

  • ________  is able to demonstrate place value concepts to give meaning to numbers from zero to 1000, identifying ones, tens, and hundreds.
  • ________  is developing an understanding of place value concepts to give meaning to numbers zero to identifying ones, tens, and hundreds.
  • ________  requires more time and practice to demonstrate place value concepts to give meaning to numbers 0 to 1000, identifying ones, tens, and 100s.

Comparing numbers

  • ________ is able to compare numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ is learning to compare numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ requires support to compare numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.
  • ________ demonstrates a limited understanding in comparing numbers to 1000 using terms such as greater or less and greatest or least.

Addition with regrouping

  • ________ can demonstrate and explain the process of addition of whole numbers up to 100, with and without regrouping.
  • ________ requires ongoing support to demonstrate and explain the process of addition of whole numbers up to 100 with and without regrouping.
  • ________ requires considerable attention and individual instruction to demonstrate and explain the process of addition of whole numbers up to 100 with and without regrouping.

Word problems (math)

  • ________ is able to complete word problems using one- and two-digit addition, showing his/her work and writing a full sentence answer.
  • ________ is becoming more confident in his/her ability to complete word problems using one- and two-digit addition, showing his/her work and writing a full sentence answer.

As we move into language and literacy, the following sections include starter report card comments which cover reading, writing, oral communication and critical thinking skills.

Language (general)

  • ________ ’s (comprehension, spelling, reading) has greatly improved, but he/she still needs extra work in (comprehension, spelling, reading). Please contact me if you need supplemental learning materials to use at home for practice.
  • ________  is conscious of putting care into his/her daily writing work, and frequently goes beyond the minimum requirements for assignments.
  • ________ has trouble with his handwriting. I believe he/she can form letters well, but has to slow down and take a little more time. Neater handwriting will improve his/her schoolwork overall.
  • ________ makes a good effort to make his/her handwriting legible. He/she is able to print on the lines, use good spacing, and form letters correctly.
  • ________ needs to focus on her spelling. More improvement is needed in the areas of (dictation, weekly spelling tests, sentence structure). Daily practice at home will help improve his/her results.
  • ________ shows the ability to quickly use spelling, punctuation and grammar rules that were recently taught. He/she is able to quickly learn new skills and is eager to apply them to his/her writing.
  • ________ is having considerable difficulty with reading, particularly with fluency and comprehension.
  • ________ speaks well in front of the class, but requires improvement in written language. He/she is having trouble with (dictation, copying words correctly, story writing, creating logical sequences). Further practice is needed in this area.
  • ________ continues to make excellent progress in spelling and reading. He/she works hard to submit work that is free of grammatical errors.
  • ________ has difficulty remembering previously discussed writing skills and often makes errors with punctuation, grammar, and overall sentence structure. Basic writing skills need improvement.

Reading responses

  • ________ is able to offer direct responses to his/her readings and supports ideas with sound reasoning and specific examples.
  • ________ is learning to offer more direct responses to her reading experiences supported by reasons, examples, and details.
  • ________ needs frequent support to offer direct responses to his/her reading experiences supported by reasons, examples, and details.

Reading comprehension

  • ________ shows good ability when completing reading comprehension tests.
  • ________ would benefit from extra practice with reading aloud and discussion of content.
  • ________ consistently demonstrates comprehension of short spoken texts by answering questions, and explaining the events described.
  • ________ consistently reads grade-level material independently.
  • ________ uses good editing skills and correctly places capitals, quotation marks, question marks, apostrophes, commas, and periods.
  • ________ is doing a good job of breaking a story into paragraphs
  • ________ determines various forms of writing and identifies important ideas through the development of insightful questions and answers.
  • ________ is able to analyze character actions, story plots, and shows strong fluency with reading.

Response journal

  • ________ uses correct spelling, grammar and punctuation when writing simple sentences.
  • ________ is encouraged to show increased attention to the use of correct spelling, grammar and punctuation with general writing skills.
  • ________ needs more time and practice in the use of correct spelling, grammar and punctuation with general writing skills.
  • ________ requires considerable assistance to achieve the correct spelling, grammar and punctuation when writing simple sentences.

Note taking

  • ________ shows an excellent understanding of note taking from lectures and readings in preparation for tests and assignments.
  • ________ requires ongoing support to develop an understanding of note taking from lectures and readings in preparation for tests.

Distance learning

  • ________ was very engaged and focused during distance learning activities, and participated in class discussions.
  • ________ stayed motivated to complete assignments during distance learning, and turned in all required materials on time. 
  • ________ needed some extra prompting to stay engaged during online lessons, but participated well in discussions when called upon. 
  • ________ modeled good online learning behavior for other students.
  • ________ was disruptive during online learning and did not meaningfully participate in class discussions.
  • ________ handled technical problems well and was always prepared.
  • Although he/she couldn’t always access a device, _________ consistently completed online assignments and asked thoughtful questions.
  • ________ should ask more questions during online discussions to avoid confusion later.
  • ________’s attendance during online lessons was infrequent and assignments were not always completed.
  • ________ worked well independently and in a group setting during distance learning activities.
  • ________ is excellent at completing distance learning activities independently, but struggled to engage with his/her classmates during breakout sessions or class discussions.
  • ________ is a technology superstar! He/she rarely needed assistance and even helped other classmates troubleshoot issues.
  • ________ asks good questions and always reaches out proactively when he/she needs help with an assignment or lesson.

Tips for teachers to write more effective report card comments

Somewhere around the halfway point to your deadline for report cards, you make your best effort to use time at the end of each week to reflect — and jot down notes — about your students’ performance and class week.

What are their strengths and weaknesses? How are their social skills developing with classmates? How is their class participation - are they an enthusiastic learner? Have they shown great improvement in one particular subject area? Are homework assignments getting done? Have any new challenges come up that affect learning?

Even just a few minutes of note-taking in the weeks preceding report card deadlines will help to ease your stress when the time comes to write your final comments.

Moreover, having a dated log of information detailed throughout the school year will help you remember how students are performing throughout each week, which can be valuable information come parent-teacher conference time.

This will also help to engage and reassure parents who want relevant and detailed commentary about their child’s performance at school.

Use Prodigy to write insightful report cards with a minimum of hassle. Prodigy Math Game is an engaging math adventure for students where success depends on correctly answering adaptive math questions. 

As students play, you’ll get insights into:

  • Which skills students are practicing
  • How far they’ve progressed through the curriculum
  • What they’ve mastered and where they need more support

Use one of Prodigy’s eight reports to track student progress throughout the year. When the time comes to write report card comments, you’ll have detailed reports on all your students’ achievements.

Just getting started with Prodigy? No problem! The first time students explore the world of Prodigy Math Game, they’ll start completing the Placement Test — without even knowing. Once they’re done, you’ll have a snapshot of the grade level they’re at, what they know and specific skills they still need to work on.

Sign up for your free teacher account today to get started!

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Although every report card cannot be glowingly positive, do strive to write in an encouraging and informational tone. As you write constructive report card comments, use encouraging language that focuses on the student’s opportunity for improvement.

For example, instead of describing a student struggling with listening as a “bad listener,” remark that the student “would benefit from listening more carefully.”

If appropriate, frame a negative comment in terms of what students are doing well -- and consider how this more successful characteristic can help them bolster performance in other areas.

Lead your report card comments with the positive comments, followed by areas that need more attention.

Choosing the right format for reporting information will simplify the entire process, while resulting in a clearer and more organized final product.

If you are unclear about your school’s format for report cards, request samples or consult with other teachers or staff members to clarify.

Being open and honest about a student’s performance requires tact and consideration with regard to how you express those comments. Be transparent, and remain mindful that your goal is to improve your students’ learning experience.

Openness and honesty are key to ensuring that experience is the best it can be. If possible, discuss what intervention strategies you can use to help improve the student’s learning outcomes. 

As elementary teacher Donna Donaghue remarks in her book A Guide for Beginning Elementary Teachers: Getting Hired and Staying Inspired:

If there is a problem, most parents will be grateful to you for telling them and will want to help you correct it as soon as possible. Many problems that show up at school are also problems noticed at home, so your comments will not surprise parents. Ideally, at some point prior to receiving the progress report, parents have already discussed the problem with you.

If you get stuck completing the comments for a particular student, move on to your other students and return to it later. You will likely have more trouble completing comments for students who have multiple areas needing further improvement and attention.

Feel free to move on and return to those students periodically or as you find the right language to express your insights.

While every report card comment is ultimately about your student, think of your students’ parents or guardians as much as possible and offer suggestions for their participation.

In fact, if you can, keep parents up to date on an ongoing basis. This will help ensure they don't get caught off guard by any of your comments.

As you make note of your students’ strengths and weaknesses, endeavor to include practical insights into how parents can involve and support their child at home. If possible, make reference to how you use differentiated instruction to support the student in question.

Simple examples of tips for parents include:

  • "Encourage your child to read. It doesn't have to be on your own either. Dedicating time before bed to read together can help make it seem like less of a chore."
  • "Find homework help for your child if needed. Myself and other parents who are also getting homework help for their child are great resources to get started."
  • "Ensure that your child completes their homework by creating a homework routine with your family where incentives like TV or computer time come after homework."
  • "Help your child with organization skills at home. If a room in your house could be tidier, try using that as an opportunity to sort things like toys or dishes and utensils."
  • "Help your child prepare for math tests by focusing their skills in addition and subtraction. If they don't like studying with traditional worksheets, try a digital game-based learning tool to help get them excited about the process."

As high school educator and teaching comprehension expert Anne Goudvis writes in her book Strategies That Work:

It is important that you include the parents in your comment so they know the child’s education is a joint mission. Sometimes you need to sound firm so that parents know you need their help and that you will not allow their child to continue inappropriate behavior.

It is unlikely that your students or parents will compare their report card comments, but it is still a best practice to aim for unique commentary for each student that reflects each, individual learning outcome.

Report card time is perhaps your busiest period of the year, and it is understandable that you want to simply get them over with.

Despite this, you should make sure to double check all your comments before hitting print and handing them out. All your communications to parents are a reflection of you as a teacher, and should mirror the care and attention you show your students in class.

Make use of your school’s parent portal or email system to let parents know — as needed — that report card time is coming up.

This will help parents be prepared, and will also ensure that any important questions they may have are addressed before the final report cards are delivered.

Record and use classroom anecdotes in your assessments. No matter how involved you are in your students’ progress, it can still be difficult to produce specific examples related to their performance if you haven’t recorded them along the way.

When you notice a positive or negative skill, ability, strength, or weakness in a class activity or assignment, be sure to note it down so that you may refer to it in your report card comments. Likewise, consider noting a sample of a student’s work every week or two.

To help with ease of access, keep ongoing files of this work in a personal folder or use a digital tool such as a Google Doc.

Putting this into practice is a time-saver and helps prevent last-minute stress. A strategy like direct observation and note-taking (as soon as possible) is far more reliable than trying to recall information and behaviors from weeks or months prior.

Report card comments should aim to deliver feedback to students and parents that is personalized, detailed, and meaningful.

Effective report card comments emphasize and discuss:

  • The specific, notable strengths that a student has shown and should attempt to continue to show
  • The specific elements of knowledge, skills, and other outcomes recognized in the curriculum that are the most pertinent to a student’s achievement or development in the period of assessment
  • The major next steps for improvement that will: identify the student’s most important learning needs, offer next steps for students and offer specific recommendations for how parents and guardians can help the student’s learning habits and skills (or the development of those habits and skills)

Effective report card comments are personalized – customized to each, individual student – and discuss:

  • The student’s learning preferences, willingness to learn, and interests
  • Detailed evidence of learning or skill-development gathered from in-class observations, and/or student assignments

Effective report card comments are expressed with clear and simple phrasing, using:

  • An encouraging and/or positive tone
  • Language that is easy to understand for both students and parents, as opposed to educational jargon used from the curriculum

Report Card Comments: Final Thoughts

Common Sense Education observes that "effective parent communication is crucial in helping students learn. But, for busy teachers it can be challenging just to keep up... Transparency and equity are key to managing any communication between home and school."

Personalized report card comments that are clear, precise, and meaningful are essential for informing students and their parents about what students have learned, what their strengths are and how they can effectively progress.

Among the pressure and deadlines of writing report cards, it can be helpful to keep these key goals in mind.

Get inspired by the report card comment examples — and strategies for success — above to ensure that precision, clarity, and meaning shine through in your report card comments.

When it comes time to hand out your report cards, you can do so with the full confidence that you are doing yourself — and each of your students — the justice your hard work deserves.

Gather student insights on Prodigy

Create or log in to your free teacher account on Prodigy — a standards-aligned, game-based learning platform that assesses student progress and performance as they play. Use Prodigy to motivate student learning, control the questions they answer as they play and collect student learning insights all year long.

Sign up for your free teacher account today!
Sours: https://www.prodigygame.com/main-en/blog/report-card-comments/

Examples montessori comments report card

Montessori Report Card Comments Samples

Listing Results Montessori Report Card Comments Samples

Sample Primary Montessori Report Card WordPress.com

6 hours ago GENERAL COMMENTS Alvin is a joy to work with. He has a great attitude towards learning. I would encourage him to read more to improve his vocabulary. Alvin is also a math genius! He is able to understand concepts very quickly and very easily. I would definitely encourage him to learn math at a higher grade level. if he is keep on doing so.

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Montessori Report Card Comments Examples

7 hours agoMontessori Report Card Comments Examples had a disappointing experience using online writing services and do not want to risk again. There is nothing surprising about that and we feel their pain. That is why Montessori Report Card Comments Examples we have introduced a long list of guarantees to protect them from spending money in vain.

Rating: 9.5/10(638)

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A Montessori Guide To Report Cards

(250) 479-4746

Just Now A Montessori Guide To Report CardsReport cards are not meant to provoke angst or stress amongst the children or their families. They are a way of communicating, in black and white, a student’s strengths, successes and challenges; a way to celebrate your child’s learning and growth. Phone: (250) 479-4746 Fax: (250) 744-1925.

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Montessori Report Card Comments Examples

5 hours agoMontessori Report Card Comments Examples make the necessary amendments free of charge. You can find out more information by visiting our revision policy and money-back guarantee pages, or by contacting our support team via online chat or phone.

Rating: 9.5/10(636)

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Sample Montessori Report Card Report card template

8 hours ago Oct 2, 2016 - The QuickSchools Report Cards module has evolved tremendously over the years, thanks to feedback from our family of schools. And we’re very proud of the simplicity and the flexibility it has to offer. Although we already offer a variety of report card templates that can suit the needs of many schools, we can also create…

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Skillsbased Report Cards for Montessori Schools

Just Now Below is a sample booklet-style skills-based report card that can be used for Montessori schools: This type of report card has traits very similar to the Standards-based report cards we mentioned for Primary (K-3/K-8) Schools. You can actually very easily set up your own standards/skills to be evaluated upon, and you can also define how each

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Sample Report Card Comments for Any Teaching Situation

8 hours agoReport card comments for students whose skills are developing: In instances like these, the key is to focus on the improvement while also providing suggestions to keep the momentum going. Try these comments: Your student has come so far in [subject]! Focusing on [important skill] is …

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Report Card Templates Montessori Teaching Resources

1 hours ago 3 Report Card Templates. May 10, 2011 at 11:51 pm · Filed under Report Card Templates. Example Report Card 5 . Example Report Card 7. Example Report Card 8. These are not Montessori Report Cards, but they are a good example of a basic report card on which you might base your own.Writing a report card is dependent on what you believe would be the most useful …

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How to Write a Montessori Progress Report for Preschoolers

9 hours ago Feb 25, 2014 - Montessori preschools bring children ages 3 to 6 together in the same classroom. Montessori teachers guide and encourage preschoolers to learn skills at their own pace, with a focus on individual hands-on learning and practical life experience.

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3 Report Card Templates Montessori Teaching Resources

5 hours ago A report card is usually a summary of work completed that year or that semester. Some Montessori schools simply offer a 5 sentence paragraph summary of activity with general comments. Some Montessori do not have any report card whatsoever. Some Montessori schools offer a checklist of several pages covering every activity that is presented in

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Report Cards Country Montessori School

(858) 673-1756

4 hours agoReport Cards: Country Montessori School teaches preschool, kindergarten & elementary. Serving Poway, Rancho Bernardo and surrounding areas. (858) 673-1756 Serving families in San Diego, North County Inland since 1989, Preschool to 5th grade.

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How Progress Reports Work in the Montessori Classroom

2 hours ago There are two basic types of Montessori progress reports: the checklist format and the narrative-style report. The checklist format is a checklist of important work, skills, and lessons that the child could receive. The curriculum is broken down into specific areas, which are assessed by an evaluative key. These keys vary, but convey the sense

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90 Quick Report Card Comments for Kindergarten Little

6 hours ago The Kindergarten Report Card Comments is a helpful resource that will save you time writing a couple dozen report cards each grading period. Sample Report Card Comments. Let’s take a look at some examples of kindergarten report card comments often found at the end of a student’s report card. These sample report card comments are broken down

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Preschool Report Card Comments Examples Montessori

4 hours agoReport Card Comments Examples Montessori. 3 Report Card Templates Montessori Teaching Resources. To the Lesson Montessori Compass Progress Reports. What to include on a preschool report card Yahoo Answers. Pre K Report Card. School Support Materials American Montessori Society. How to Evaluate the 1 / 8

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The Primary Montessori Template – QuickSchools Blog

3 hours ago The Primary Montessori template is one from the library of private templates. It’s a single-term, booklet-style report card that’s designed to show detailed grading criteria and comments. It’s perfect for Montessori elementary schools. Let’s take a look at a sample report card. Designed and built by Regie and Ezekiel, this lovely

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Montessori Progress Report & Worksheets Teachers Pay

Just Now One-Page Progress Report for Preschool, PreK, and K. by. Grace Millsaps. $2.99. $2.49. PDF. This is a progress report that I created to use with 2, 3, 4, and 5 year olds at my Montessori school. The download includes .pdfs of the one-page report in both color and black and white.

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Create a Progress Report Montessori Compass Knowledge Base

3 hours ago Below are some samples of each section of a Progress Report as it would appear on the web, outlining some ways in which you can customize these to communicate more specific and personal information about each student. Summary Tab. Academic Report Tab. Skills Report Tab. Standards Report Tab. The PDF version of a Progress Report will look different.

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How to Write a Montessori Progress Report for Preschoolers

7 hours ago According to the North American Montessori Center, there are two common formats: the checklist-based report and the narrative report. Provide basic information at the top of the progress report, including the date, teacher's name, dates covered by the report, and the student's name, age and grade level. Create a checklist or spreadsheet that

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10 Common Montessori Learning Materials and How They Help

3 hours ago The Montessori method encourages self-directed learning through exploration and play. We help children learn through a variety of specially developed materials. These materials may look like fun toys, but they are designed to help your child learn and master difficult concepts. Here are some of the most common learning materials you might see in a […]

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Montessori Kindergarten Progress Report Templates at

2 hours ago This Montessori Kindergarten Progress Report covers the most important topics that you are looking for and will help you to structure and communicate in a professional manner with those involved. Mary Jo Student DOB School Year MATH Knows simple grouping of basic functions with materials: Addition, Subtraction, Multiplication, Division

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Report cards/ progress reports – Teachers.Net (Montessori)

Just Now • Post, comment, & upload pics • Get notified of responses • Join teacher groups • Apply to teacher jobs • Post a resume: LOGIN: Create a free account [X] Close. report cards/ progress reports. by roseann. Sep 24, 2010. need help finding a good montessori kindergarten report card and a new progress report for the 3-6 class. Like

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105 Report Card Comments for Literacy You'll Find Helpful

1 hours ago 105 Report Card Comments for Literacy You’ll Find Helpful. It’s that time again…time to draft your reading and writing report card comments. I’ve got a list of 105 reading and writing report card comments that will hopefully be of some support to you as you write your student comments. I’ve also got a useful formula that will help you

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Report Card Comments and Phrases Social Studies

2 hours agoReport Card Comments & Phrases—Social Studies. Make the most of your report card writing time using these suggested comments and phrases for social studies. Appropriate for all grade levels, they can be edited or modified for particular students or classroom scenarios.

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Assessment

9 hours agoReport Card Comments (cont.) Math and Science In writing comments for student report cards, use the following phrases to make positive comments regarding students’ progress in math and science. † Is mastering math concepts easily † Math/Science is a favorite area of study for_____. † Has a naturally investigative nature

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Report Card Templates « Montessori Alliance

Just NowReport Template donated by The Glebe Primary Montessori School. Suitable for the 3-6 age bracket. Individual Child Progress Report to be used for Parent & Teacher Meetings. Report is in Word format and can be filled in on your computer and printed when needed. Individual Child Progress Report (2 per page) to be used for Parent & Teacher Meetings.

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Montessori Assessment Tools & Resources

1 hours agoMontessori Assessment Tools & Resources Assessment Tools. Use a lesson tracking document (like this record-keeping document from Montessori Printshop) that indicates presented to the child, assistance required, and mastery of the work. Examples of the child’s work give a good indication of the progress made and where attention needs focus

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Montessori ParentTeacher Conference: A Parent's Perspective

8 hours ago The status report provides an update on all the areas of language, math, sensorial, practical life, social/emotional development, motor development and work related. In addition, both teacher and parent comments are captured during the conference. At our child’s Montessori school, there are both fall and spring parent-teacher conferences.

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Montessori Report Card Comments

4 hours agoMontessori Report Card Comments, Argumentative Essay On Clothing, Writing For 1st Grade, How To Evalute A Good Hook In An Essay

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Teachers Network: How To: Report Card Comments

8 hours agoTeachers Network seeks to improve student learning by helping teachers integrate web-based lessons into their instructional practice. Browse free lesson plans by Subject and/or Grade. Teachers Network Leadership Institute (TNLI) was comprised of hundreds of teachers from affiliates nationwide. TNLI Fellows-teachers with full-time classroom teaching responsibilities-researched policy issues and

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Sample Student Report Cards Curriculum & Instruction

847.459.4260

2 hours ago Kildeer Countryside Community Consolidated School District 96 1050 Ivy Hall Lane Buffalo Grove, IL 60089. Phone: 847.459.4260

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How to Evaluate the Progress of a Montessori Child

8 hours ago 3. The third part of the assessment should include a written portion that summarizes the child’s progress as observed by the teacher. Observation notes can be included to support the conclusions. It’s helpful to briefly mention the general characteristics of a Montessori child and how this particular child is moving ahead in each area.

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Teacher Comments on Report Cards by Leah Davies, M.Ed.

8 hours agoReport cards provide parents with essential information concerning their child’s progress in school. Various formats are used including letter grades, numbers, checklists and teacher comments that indicate how a child is performing in different areas. For each report card period, teachers usually write descriptive comments for every student.

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End Of Year Report Card Comments Examples

2 hours agoreport comments examples and does not understand behaviors he struggles to have to remote login to know report comment generator on. Has shown strong growth in ____. Your last request is still being processed. Has shown remarkable strides in our school year of report card writing help with a nightly has a call to focus more at all employees.

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To the Lesson!: Montessori Compass: Progress Reports

1 hours ago Thanks Sasha! If any of your readers would like to see how Montessori Compass works in their classroom, here's a promo code. Just click the Get Started link at www.montessoricompass.com to start your 30-day free trial and enter promo code "TOTHELESSON" to receive an additional 3 months of service @ 50% discount.

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Toddler progress report Team Rasler

7 hours ago Toddler progress report. I’ve written many a progress report in my decade of being a teacher. Recently, however, I received my first one. For my child, that is. Theo’s not even one and a half and only goes to Montessori two days a week, but his teacher dutifully marked out what he can and can’t do so far this year.

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Montessori report card template Bing

4 hours agoMontessori Report Card Example Montessori Progress Report Template Elementary Report Card Templates Free Report Card Templates 1 2 3 Related searches for montessori report card template How to Write a Montessori School Progress Report Card eHow www.ehow.com › Education › K-12 › K-12 For Educators

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Preschool Progress Report Template Word – Teaching Treasure

Just Now Progress report samples for word progress report samples for word. Making a progress report of the preschool student is a more challenging task as compared to a matured student. The weekly progress report should be made in such a way that the person can impress his manager.

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Montessori for Everyone Free Montessori Downloads

1 hours ago Includes nomenclature cards, word study cards, a consonant blends game, all sorts of pre-reading activities, and grammar and punctuation work too! Cultural Materials Includes a printable book about plants, lots of work for geography, zoology, weather, and more.

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Customize 46+ Preschool Report Cards Templates Online Canva

5 hours ago Early child education teachers and parents use many tools to track the children’s progress. One of the most important ones is the report card, which comprises a record or summary of the child’s performance in terms of academics, social development, and behavior. Luckily, creating a good-looking report card is as easy as reciting your ABC’s.

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Good Comments For Progress Reports For Toddlers

5 hours ago general report card comments, sample progress report comments for toddlers preschool, toddler progress report mom answers babycenter, pin by meghan tornell on school stuff report card, 5 sample progress report formats mass gov, 105 report card comments to use and adapt prodigy, report card comments for elementary teachers thoughtco, report card

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Free Montessori Materials Online

5 hours agoMontessori Print Shop was one of my main sources for free Montessori materials during my school placement. Along with many materials for sale, it has a very nice selection of free Montessori materials. Montessori for Everyone was another great source of free Montessori downloads for me. The site also has an extensive selection of downloads for sale, both at the preschool and elementary levels.

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Philadelphia Montessori Charter School

5 hours ago 2016-2017 School Progress Report Philadelphia Montessori Charter School Educator E ectiveness Teacher e ectiveness measures are being described in the School Progress Report, but not included in the SPR rating, to share data we are gathering to monitor and support teacher practice.

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10 Helpful Tips for Writing Student Reports Teach Starter

Just NowReport Card Comments. Sample report card comments for General, English and Mathematics. 7 pages K - 7. teaching resource Parent Teacher Interview Planning Template. A planning template for parent teacher interviews. 1 page. teaching resource Mathematics Assessment Tracker - Complete Set (Australian Curriculum) Foundation to Year 7.

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Pin on quotes Pinterest

8 hours ago A annual day speech report/template that can be used to deliver speech for Annual Day at school/college. A woman of virtue and simplicity, I feel elated to introduce her to everyone tonight. She is the living idiom of a woman who happened to be born at the right time and at the right place.

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Montessori, Day Care 101, and Puppy Head Start Customer

1 hours ago Optional: Get your pup to the head of the class! Due to overwhelming demand we have implemented an optional expedited review fee. If you're in a hurry and would like us to review your application within two (2) business days and schedule your dog for a behavior assessment within one (1) to three (3) business days, we can do that for a $50 non

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Harvey Mudd Supplement Essay Samples

1 hours ago Cheap paper writing service provides high-quality essays for affordable prices. It might seem impossible to you that all custom-written essays, research papers, speeches, book reviews, and other Harvey Mudd Supplement Essay Samples custom task completed by our writers are both of high quality and cheap. It is surprising, but we do have some tricks to lower prices without hindering quality.

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Frequently Asked Questions

What kind of report card does a montessori school use?

It’s a single-term, booklet-style report card that’s designed to show detailed grading criteria and comments. It’s perfect for Montessori elementary schools. Let’s take a look at a sample report card.

What to write on a montessori progress report?

Here is a Montessori  Progress Report form that will suit your needs. All areas of learning are laid out and all you need to do is write in a brief comment where appropriate. Enjoy the confidence of your parents by communicating effectively with them concerning the progress and development of their child.

Which is the best template for primary montessori?

The Primary Montessori template is one from the library of private templates. It’s a single-term, booklet-style report card that’s designed to show detailed grading criteria and comments. It’s perfect for Montessori elementary schools. Let’s take a look at a sample report card.

Where can i find a montessori progress card?

Some filters moved to Formats filters, which is at the top of the page. This is a Montessori Progress report card for parents, can be giving out during Parent Teacher Conferences. The Montessori Classroom Forms Bundle includes 9 separate forms for managing your 3-6 yr Early Childhood Montessori classroom.

Sours: https://www.webcontactus.com/montessori-report-card-comments-samples/
Sample Report Card Comments

Opening my mouth in amazement, I take a glass in my hands and see with peripheral vision how the curtain in the. Tail swung. The blood from the heart in a fountain in different directions hit the head and What secrets are kept in the diaries of our classmates.

What secret desires are contained in them.

Now discussing:

My cock was already tearing my black lace panties on me - he could not stand such arousal. flesh with its razor-sharp heels. The couple then began to fondle and kiss, Andy staring at them from his awkward position on the floor.



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