Words with second letter r

Words with second letter r DEFAULT
Gravel

Gravel-stone (n.) A pebble, or small fragment of stone; a calculus.

Gross-headed (a.) Thick-skulled; stupid.

Grozing iron () A tool with a hardened steel point, formerly used instead of a diamond for cutting glass.

Grozing iron () A tool for smoothing the solder joints of lead pipe.

Grudgingness (n.) The state or quality of grudging, or of being full of grudge or unwillingness.

Irascibility (n.) The quality or state of being irascible; irritability of temper; irascibleness.

Iron-hearted (a.) Hard-hearted; unfeeling; cruel; as, an iron-hearted master.

Irrationally (adv.) In an irrational manner.

Irrebuttable (a.) Incapable of being rebutted.

Irrecordable (a.) Not fit or possible to be recorded.

Irredeemable (a.) Not redeemable; that can not be redeemed; not payable in gold or silver, as a bond; -- used especially of such government notes, issued as currency, as are not convertible into coin at the pleasure of the holder.

Irreflection (n.) Want of reflection.

Irreflective (a.) Not reflective.

Irrefromable (a.) Incapable of being reformed; incorrigible.

Irrefragable (a.) Not refragable; not to be gainsaid or denied; not to be refuted or overthrown; unanswerable; incontestable; undeniable; as, an irrefragable argument; irrefragable evidence.

Irregeneracy (n.) Unregeneracy.

Irregularist (n.) One who is irregular.

Irregularity (n.) The state or quality of being irregular; that which is irregular.

Irrejectable (a.) That can not be rejected; irresistible.

Irrelapsable (a.) Not liable to relapse; secure.

Irrelievable (a.) Not admitting relief; incurable; hopeless.

Irremediable (a.) Not to be remedied, corrected, or redressed; incurable; as, an irremediable disease or evil.

Irremediably (adv.) In a manner, or to a degree, that precludes remedy, cure, or correction.

Irremissible (a.) Not remissible; unpardonable; as, irremissible crimes.

Irremittable (a.) Not capable of being remitted; irremissible.

Irrepealable (a.) Not repealable; not capable of being repealed or revoked, as a law.

Irrepentance (n.) Want of repentance; impenitence.

Irreprovable (a.) Incapable of being justly reproved; irreproachable; blameless; upright.

Irreptitious (a.) Surreptitious; spurious.

Irresistance (n.) Nonresistance; passive submission.

Irresistible (a.) That can not be successfully resisted or opposed; superior to opposition; resistless; overpowering; as, an irresistible attraction.

Irresistibly (adv.) In an irrestible manner.

Irresistless (a.) Irresistible.

Irresolution (n.) Want of resolution; want of decision in purpose; a fluctuation of mind, as in doubt, or between hope and fear; irresoluteness; indecision; vacillation.

Irresolvable (a.) Incapable of being resolved; not separable into component parts.

Irresolvedly (adv.) Without settled determination; in a hesitating manner; doubtfully.

Irrespective (a.) Without regard for conditions, circumstances, or consequences; unbiased; independent; impartial; as, an irrespective judgment.

Irrespective (a.) Disrespectful.

Irrespirable (a.) Unfit for respiration; not having the qualities necessary to support animal life; as, irrespirable air.

Irresponsive (a.) Not responsive; not able, ready, or inc

Irretractile (a.) Not retractile.

Irretractile (a.) Not tractile or ductile.

Irreturnable (a.) Not to be returned.

Irrevealable (a.) Incapable of being revealed.

Irreverently (adv.) In an irreverent manner.

Irreversible (a.) Incapable of being reversed or turned about or back; incapable of being made to run backward; as, an irreversible engine.

Irreversible (a.) Incapable of being reversed, recalled, repealed, or annulled; as, an irreversible sentence or decree.

Irreversibly (adv.) In an irreversible manner.

Irrhetorical (a.) Not rethorical.

Irritability (n.) The state or quality of being irritable; quick excitability; petulance; fretfulness; as, irritability of temper.

Irritability (n.) A natural susceptibility, characteristic of all living organisms, tissues, and cells, to the influence of certain stimuli, response being manifested in a variety of ways, -- as that quality in plants by which they exhibit motion under suitable stimulation; esp., the property which living muscle processes, of responding either to a direct stimulus of its substance, or to the stimulating influence of its nerve fibers, the response being indicated by a change of form, or contrac

Irritability (n.) A condition of morbid excitability of an organ or part of the body; undue susceptibility to the influence of stimuli. See Irritation, n., 3.

Irrotational (a.) Not rotatory; passing from one point to another by a movement other than rotation; -- said of the movement of parts of a liquid or yielding mass.

Orang-outang (n.) An arboreal anthropoid ape (Simia satyrus), which inhabits Borneo and Sumatra. Often called simply orang.

Orbiculation (n.) The state or quality of being orbiculate; orbicularness.

Orchidaceous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a natural order (Orchidaceae) of endogenous plants of which the genus Orchis is the type. They are mostly perennial herbs having the stamens and pistils united in a single column, and normally three petals and three sepals, all adherent to the ovary. The flowers are curiously shaped, often resembling insects, the odd or lower petal (called the lip) being unlike the others, and sometimes of a strange and unexpected appearance. About one hundred sp

Ordinability (n.) Capability of being ordained or appointed.

Ordinaryship (n.) The state of being an ordinary.

Oregon grape () An evergreen species of barberry (Berberis Aquifolium), of Oregon and California; also, its roundish, blue-black berries.

Organization (n.) The act of organizing; the act of arranging in a systematic way for use or action; as, the organization of an army, or of a deliberative body.

Organization (n.) The state of being organized; also, the relations included in such a state or condition.

Organization (n.) That which is organized; an organized existence; an organism

Organization (n.) an arrangement of parts for the performance of the functions necessary to life.

Organography (n.) A description of the organs of animals or plants.

Organoleptic (a.) Making an impression upon an organ; plastic; -- said of the effect or impression produced by any substance on the organs of touch, taste, or smell, and also on the organism as a whole.

Orichalceous (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, orichalch; having a color or luster like that of brass.

Orientalized (imp. & p. p.) of Orientalize

Originalness (n.) The quality of being original; originality.

Ornamentally (adv.) By way of ornament.

Ornithologic (a.) Alt. of Ornithological

Ornithomancy (n.) Divination by means of birds, their flight, etc.

Ornithopappi (n. pl.) An extinct order of birds. It includes only the Archaeopteryx.

Ornithoscopy (n.) Observation of birds and their habits.

Orographical (a.) Of or pertaining to orography.

Orthoclastic (a.) Breaking in directions at right angles to each other; -- said of the monoclinic feldspars.

Orthodoxally (adv.) Orthodoxly.

Orthodoxical (a.) Pertaining to, or evincing, orthodoxy; orthodox.

Orthodoxness (n.) The quality or state of being orthodox; orthodoxy.

Orthodromics (n.) The art of sailing in a direct course, or on the arc of a great circle, which is the shortest distance between any two points on the surface of the globe; great-circle sailing; orthodromy.

Orthognathic (a.) Orthognathous.

Orthogonally (adv.) Perpendicularly; at right angles; as, a curve cuts a set of curves orthogonally.

Orthographer (n.) One versed in orthography; one who spells words correctly.

Orthographic (a.) Alt. of Orthographical

Orthomorphic (a.) Having the right form.

Orthopedical (a.) Pertaining to, or employed in, orthopedy; relating to the prevention or cure of deformities of children, or, in general, of the human body at any age; as, orthopedic surgery; an orthopedic hospital.

Orthopterous (a.) Of or pertaining to the Orthoptera.

Orthorhombic (a.) Noting the system of crystallization which has three unequal axes at right angles to each other; trimetric. See Crystallization.

Orthosilicic (a.) Designating the form of silicic acid having the normal or highest number of hydroxyl groups.

Orthotropous (a.) Having the axis of an ovule or seed straight from the hilum and chalaza to the orifice or the micropyle; atropous.

Oryctography (n.) Description of fossils.

Oryctologist (n.) One versed in oryctology.

Practicality (n.) The quality or state of being practical; practicalness.

Practicalize (v. t.) To render practical.

Practitioner (n.) One who is engaged in the actual use or exercise of any art or profession, particularly that of law or medicine.

Practitioner (n.) One who does anything customarily or habitually.

Practitioner (n.) A sly or artful person.

Praecoracoid (n.) See Precoracoid.

Praemunitory (a.) See Premunitory.

Praiseworthy (a.) Worthy of praise or applause; commendable; as, praiseworthy action; he was praiseworthy.

Praseodymium (n.) An elementary substance, one of the constituents of didymium; -- so called from the green color of its salts. Symbol Ps. Atomic weight 143.6.

Praxinoscope (n.) An instrument, similar to the phenakistoscope, for presenting to view, or projecting upon a screen, images the natural motions of real objects.

Preachership (n.) The office of a preacher.

Preadvertise (v. t.) To advertise beforehand; to preannounce publicly.

Preassurance (n.) Previous assurance.

Prebronchial (a.) Situated in front of the bronchus; -- applied especially to an air sac on either side of the esophagus of birds.

Precalculate (v. t.) To calculate or determine beforehand; to prearrange.

Precautional (a.) Precautionary.

Precedaneous (a.) Preceding; antecedent; previous.

Precedential (a.) Of the nature of a precedent; having force as an example for imitation; as, precedential transactions.

Preceptorial (a.) Of or pertaining to a preceptor.

Preceptories (pl. ) of Preceptory

Precessional (a.) Of or pertaining to pression; as, the precessional movement of the equinoxes.

Preciousness (n.) The quality or state of being precious; cost

Precipitable (a.) Capable of being precipitated, or cast to the bottom, as a substance in solution. See Precipitate, n. (Chem.)

Precipitance (n.) Alt. of Precipitancy

Precipitancy (n.) The quality or state of being precipitant, or precipitate; headlong hurry; excessive or rash haste in resolving, forming an opinion, or executing a purpose; precipitation; as, the precipitancy of youth.

Precipitated (imp. & p. p.) of Precipitate

Precipitator (n.) One who precipitates, or urges on with vehemence or rashness.

Precipitious (a.) Precipitous.

Precisianism (n.) The quality or state of being a precisian; the practice of a precisian.

Precisianist (n.) A precisian.

Precociously (adv.) In a precocious manner.

Precoetanean (n.) One contemporary with, but older than, another.

Precognition (n.) Previous cognition.

Precognition (n.) A preliminary examination of a criminal case with reference to a prosecution.

Precomposing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Precompose

Preconceived (imp. & p. p.) of Preconceive

Preconcerted (imp. & p. p.) of Preconcert

Preconcerted (a.) Previously arranged; agreed upon beforehand.

Precondition (n.) A previous or antecedent condition; a preliminary condition.

Preconscious (a.) Of or pertaining to a state before consciousness.

Preconsigned (imp. & p. p.) of Preconsign

Predecessive (a.) Going before; preceding.

Predesignate (a.) A term used by Sir William Hamilton to define propositions having their quantity indicated by a verbal sign; as, all, none, etc.; -- contrasted with preindesignate, defining propositions of which the quantity is not so indicated.

Predestinary (a.) Predestinarian.

Predestinate (a.) Predestinated; foreordained; fated.

Predestinate (v. t.) To predetermine or foreordain; to appoint or ordain beforehand by an unchangeable purpose or decree; to preelect.

Predestining (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Predestine

Predermining (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Predetermine

Predetermine (v. t.) To determine (something) beforehand.

Predetermine (v. t.) To doom by previous decree; to foredoom.

Predetermine (v. i.) To determine beforehand.

Prediastolic (a.) Preceding the diastole of the heart; as, a prediastolic friction sound.

Predictional (a.) Prophetic; prognostic.

Predigestion (n.) Digestion too soon performed; hasty digestion.

Predigestion (n.) Artificial digestion of food for use in illness or impaired digestion.

Predilection (n.) A previous liking; a prepossession of mind in favor of something; predisposition to choose or like; partiality.

Prediscovery (n.) A previous discovery.

Predisponent (a.) Disposing beforehand; predisposing.

Predisponent (n.) That which predisposes.

Predisposing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Predispose

Predominance (n.) The quality or state of being predominant; superiority; ascendency; prevalence; predomination.

Predominance (n.) The superior influence of a planet.

Predominancy (n.) Predominance.

Predominated (imp. & p. p.) of Predominate

Preeminently (adv.) In a preeminent degree.

Preemptioner (n.) One who holds a prior to purchase certain public land.

Preestablish (v. t.) To establish beforehand.

Preexamining (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Preexamine

Preexistence (n.) Existence in a former state, or previous to something else.

Preexistence (n.) Existence of the soul before its union with the body; -- a doctrine held by certain philosophers.

Preexistency (n.) Preexistence.

Prefectorial (a.) Of or pertaining to a prefect.

Preferential (a.) Giving, indicating, or having a preference or precedence; as, a preferential claim; preferential shares.

Prefloration (n.) Aestivation.

Prefoliation (n.) Vernation.

Preformation (n.) An old theory of the preexistence of germs. Cf. Embo/tement.

Preformative (n.) A formative letter at the beginning of a word.

Pregravitate (v. i.) To descend by gravity; to sink.

Pregustation (n.) The act of tasting beforehand; foretaste.

Prehensi-ble (a.) Capable of being seized.

Preindispose (v. t.) To render indisposed beforehand.

Prejudicated (imp. & p. p.) of Prejudicate

Preknowledge (n.) Prior knowledge.

Prelatically (adv.) In a prelatical manner; with reference to prelates.

Premaxillary (a.) Situated in front of the maxillary bones; pertaining to the premaxillae; intermaxillary.

Premaxillary (n.) A premaxilla.

Premeditated (imp. & p. p.) of Premeditate

Premonishing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Premonish

Premonstrant (n.) A Premonstratensian.

Premonstrate (v. t.) To show beforehand; to foreshow.

Prenticehood (n.) Apprenticehood.

Prenticeship (n.) Apprenticeship.

Preoblongata (n.) The anterior part of the medulla oblongata.

Preoccupancy (n.) The act or right of taking possession before another; as, the preoccupancy of wild land.

Preoccupying (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Preoccupy

Preopercular (a.) Situated in front of the operculum; pertaining to the preoperculum.

Preopercular (n.) The preoperculum.

Preoperculum (n.) The anterior opercular bone in fishes.

Preordinance (n.) Antecedent decree or determination.

Preponderant (a.) Preponderating; outweighing; overbalancing; -- used literally and figuratively; as, a preponderant weight; of preponderant importance.

Preponderate (v. t.) To outweigh; to overpower by weight; to exceed in weight; to overbalance.

Preponderate (v. t.) To overpower by stronger or moral power.

Preponderate (v. t.) To cause to prefer; to inc

Preponderate (v. i.) To exceed in weight; hence, to inc

Prepossessed (imp. & p. p.) of Prepossess

Prepossessor (n.) One who possesses, or occupies, previously.

Preposterous (a.) Having that first which ought to be last; inverted in order.

Preposterous (a.) Contrary to nature or reason; not adapted to the end; utterly and glaringly foolish; unreasonably absurd; perverted.

Prerequisite (a.) Previously required; necessary as a preliminary to any proposed effect or end; as, prerequisite conditions of success.

Prerequisite (n.) Something previously required, or necessary to an end or effect proposed.

Preresolving (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Preresolve

Prerogatived (a.) Endowed with a prerogative, or exclusive privilege.

Presbyterate (n.) A presbytery; also, presbytership.

Presbyteress (n.) A female presbyter.

Presbyterial (a.) Presbyterian.

Presbyterian (a.) Of or pertaining to a presbyter, or to ecclesiastical government by presbyters; relating to those who uphold church government by presbyters; also, to the doctrine, discip

Presbyterian (n.) One who maintains the validity of ordination and government by presbyters; a member of the Presbyterian church.

Presbyterium (n.) Same as Presbytery, 4.

Presbyteries (pl. ) of Presbytery

Presciendent (a.) Foreknowing; having foreknowledge; as, prescious of ills.

Prescription (n.) The act of prescribing, directing, or dictating; direction; precept; also, that which is prescribed.

Prescription (n.) A direction of a remedy or of remedies for a disease, and the manner of using them; a medical recipe; also, a prescribed remedy.

Prescription (n.) A prescribing for title; the claim of title to a thing by virtue immemorial use and enjoyment; the right or title acquired by possession had during the time and in the manner fixed by law.

Prescriptive (a.) Consisting in, or acquired by, immemorial or long-continued use and enjoyment; as, a prescriptive right of title; pleading the continuance and authority of long custom.

Presensation (n.) Previous sensation, notion, or idea.

Presentation (n.) The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; a setting forth; an offering; bestowal.

Presentation (n.) exhibition; representation; display; appearance; semblance; show.

Presentation (n.) That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as, the picture was a presentation.

Presentation (n.) The act of offering a clergyman to the bishop or ordinary for institution in a benefice; the right of presenting a clergyman.

Presentation (n.) The particular position of the child during labor relatively to the passage though which it is to be brought forth; -- specifically designated by the part which first appears at the mouth of the uterus; as, a breech presentation.

Presentative (a.) Having the right of presentation, or offering a clergyman to the bishop for institution; as, advowsons are presentative, collative, or donative.

Presentative (a.) Admitting the presentation of a clergyman; as, a presentative parsonage.

Presentative (a.) Capable of being directly known by, or presented to, the mind; intuitive; directly apprehensible, as objects; capable of apprehending, as faculties.

Presentiment (n.) Previous sentiment, conception, or opinion; previous apprehension; especially, an antecedent impression or conviction of something unpleasant, distressing, or calamitous, about to happen; anticipation of evil; foreboding.

Preservation (n.) The act or process of preserving, or keeping safe; the state of being preserved, or kept from injury, destruction, or decay; security; safety; as, preservation of life, fruit, game, etc.; a picture in good preservation.

Preservative (a.) Having the power or quality of preserving; tending to preserve, or to keep from injury, decay, etc.

Preservative (n.) That which preserves, or has the power of preserving; a presevative agent.

Preservatory (a.) Preservative.

Preservatory (n.) A preservative.

Preservatory (n.) A room, or apparatus, in which perishable things, as fruit, vegetables, etc., can be preserved without decay.

Presidencies (pl. ) of Presidency

Presidential (a.) Presiding or watching over.

Presidential (a.) Of or pertaining to a president; as, the presidential chair; a presidential election.

Presignified (imp. & p. p.) of Presignify

Pressiroster (n.) One of a tribe of wading birds (Pressirostres) including those which have a compressed beak, as the plovers.

Prestigiator (n.) A juggler; prestidigitator.

Presumptuous (a.) Full of presumption; presuming; overconfident or venturesome; audacious; rash; taking liberties unduly; arrogant; insolent; as, a presumptuous commander; presumptuous conduct.

Presumptuous (a.) Founded on presumption; as, a presumptuous idea.

Presumptuous (a.) Done with hold design, rash confidence, or in violation of known duty; willful.

Presupposing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Presuppose

Pretenceless (a.) See Pretense, Pretenseful, Pretenseless.

Pretendingly (adv.) As by right or title; arrogantly; presumptuously.

Pretenseless (a.) Not having or making pretenses.

Pretentative (a.) Fitted for trial beforehand; experimental.

Preteritness (n.) The quality or state of being past.

Preterlapsed (a.) Past; as, preterlapsed ages.

Pretermitted (imp. & p. p.) of Pretermit

Pretypifying (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Pretypify

Prevailingly (adv.) So as to prevail.

Prevaricated (imp. & p. p.) of Prevaricate

Prevaricator (n.) One who prevaricates.

Prevaricator (n.) A sham dealer; one who colludes with a defendant in a sham prosecution.

Prevaricator (n.) One who betrays or abuses a trust.

Preventative (n.) That which prevents; -- incorrectly used instead of preventive.

Preventingly (adv.) So as to prevent or hinder.

Preventional (a.) Tending to prevent.

Preventively (adv.) In a preventive manner.

Prevertebral (a.) Situated immediately in front, or on the ventral side, of the vertebral column; prespinal.

Previousness (n.) The quality or state of being previous; priority or antecedence in time.

Priest

Prima donnas (pl. ) of Prima donna

Primigenious (a.) Alt. of Primigenous

Primogenitor (n.) The first ancestor; a forefather.

Primordially (adv.) At the beginning; under the first order of things; originally.

Primulaceous (a.) Of or pertaining to an order of herbaceous plants (Primulaceae), of which the primrose is the type, and the pimpernel, the cyclamen, and the water violet are other examples.

Prince

Princesslike (a.) Like a princess.

Principality (n.) Sovereignty; supreme power; hence, superiority; predominance; high, or the highest, station.

Principality (n.) A prince; one invested with sovereignty.

Principality (n.) The territory or jurisdiction of a prince; or the country which gives title to a prince; as, the principality of Wales.

Prismatoidal (a.) Having a prismlike form.

Privateering (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Privateer

Privateering (n.) Cruising in a privateer.

Probationary (a.) Of or pertaining to probation; serving for trial.

Problematist (n.) One who proposes problems.

Problematize (v. t.) To propose problems.

Proboscidate (a.) Having a proboscis; proboscidial.

Proboscidean (a.) Proboscidian.

Proboscidial (a.) Proboscidate.

Proboscidian (a.) Pertaining to the Proboscidea.

Proboscidian (n.) One of the Proboscidea.

Procatarctic (a.) Beginning; predisposing; exciting; initial.

Procellarian (n.) One of a family of oceanic birds (Procellaridae) including the petrels, fulmars, and shearwaters. They are often seen in great abundance in stormy weather.

Processional (a.) Of or pertaining to a procession; consisting in a procession.

Processional (n.) A service book relating to ecclesiastical processions.

Processional (n.) A hymn, or other selection, sung during a church procession; as, the processional was the 202d hymn.

Processioner (n.) One who takes part in a procession.

Processioner (n.) A manual of processions; a processional.

Processioner (n.) An officer appointed to procession lands.

Proclamation (n.) The act of proclaiming; official or general notice; publication.

Proclamation (n.) That which is proclaimed, publicly announced, or officially declared; a published ordinance; as, the proclamation of a king; a Thanksgiving proclamation.

Proconsulary (a.) Of or pertaining of a proconsul; as, proconsular powers.

Proconsulary (a.) Under the government of a proconsul; as, a proconsular province.

Proconsulate (n.) The office jurisdiction of a proconsul, or the term of his office.

Prodigiously (adv.) Enormously; wonderfully; astonishingly; as, prodigiously great.

Prodigiously (adv.) Very much; extremely; as, he was prodigiously pleased.

Proditorious (a.) Treacherous; perfidious; traitorous.

Proditorious (a.) Apt to make unexpected revelations.

Productivity (n.) The quality or state of being productive; productiveness.

Professional (a.) Of or pertaining to a profession, or calling; conforming to the rules or standards of a profession; following a profession; as, professional knowledge; professional conduct.

Professional (a.) Engaged in by professionals; as, a professional race; -- opposed to amateur.

Professional (n.) A person who prosecutes anything professionally, or for a livelihood, and not in the character of an amateur; a professional worker.

Professorial (a.) Of or pertaining to a professor; as, the professional chair; professional interest.

Professoriat (n.) See Professoriate.

Proficiently (adv.) In a proficient manner.

Profligately (adv.) In a profligate manner.

Profligation (n.) Defeat; rout; overthrow.

Profoundness (n.) The quality or state of being profound; profundity; depth.

Progenitress (n.) A female progenitor.

Proglottides (pl. ) of Proglottis

Prolegomenon (n.) A preliminary remark or observation; an introductory discourse prefixed to a book or treatise.

Proletaneous (a.) Having a numerous offspring.

Proletariate (n.) The lower classes; beggars.

Prolificness (n.) The quality or state of being prolific; fruitfulness; prolificacy.

Prolongating (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Prolongate

Prolongation (n.) The act of lengthening in space or in time; extension; protraction.

Prolongation (n.) That which forms an additional length.

Promissorily (adv.) In a promissory manner.

Promontories (pl. ) of Promontory

Promulgating (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Promulgate

Promulgation (n.) The act of promulgating; publication; open declaration; as, the promulgation of the gospel.

Pronominally (adv.) In a pronominal manner/ with the nature or office of a pronoun; as a pronoun.

Pronunciator (n.) One who pronounces; a pronouncer.

Propaedeutic (a.) Alt. of Propaedeutical

Propagandism (n.) The art or practice of propagating tenets or principles; zeal in propagating one's opinions.

Propagandist (n.) A person who devotes himself to the spread of any system of principles.

Propensities (pl. ) of Propensity

Properispome (n.) Properispomenon.

Prophragmata (pl. ) of Prophragma

Prophylactic (n.) A medicine which preserves or defends against disease; a preventive.

Prophylactic (a.) Alt. of Prophylactical

Propitiating (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Propitiate

Propitiation (n.) The act of appeasing the wrath and conciliating the favor of an offended person; the act of making propitious.

Propitiation (n.) That which propitiates; atonement or atoning sacrifice; specifically, the influence or effects of the death of Christ in appeasing the divine justice, and conciliating the divine favor.

Propitiatory (a.) Having the power to make propitious; pertaining to, or employed in, propitiation; expiatory; as, a propitiatory sacrifice.

Propitiatory (n.) The mercy seat; -- so called because a symbol of the propitiated Jehovah.

Proportioned (imp. & p. p.) of Proportion

Proportional (a.) Having a due proportion, or comparative relation; being in suitable proportion or degree; as, the parts of an edifice are proportional.

Proportional (a.) Relating to, or securing, proportion.

Proportional (a.) Constituting a proportion; having the same, or a constant, ratio; as, proportional quantities; momentum is proportional to quantity of matter.

Proportional (n.) Any number or quantity in a proportion; as, a mean proportional.

Proportional (n.) The combining weight or equivalent of an element.

Proprietress (n.) A female proprietor.

Propterygium (n.) The anterior of three principal cartilages in the fins of some fishes.

Propugnation (n.) Means of defense; defense.

Propulsation (n.) The act of driving away or repelling; a keeping at a distance.

Prorectorate (n.) The office of prorector.

Proscription (n.) The act of proscribing; a dooming to death or exile; outlawry; specifically, among the ancient Romans, the public offer of a reward for the head of a political enemy; as, under the triumvirate, many of the best Roman citizens fell by proscription.

Proscription (n.) The state of being proscribed; denunciation; interdiction; prohibition.

Proscriptive (a.) Of or pertaining to proscription; consisting in, or of the nature of, proscription; proscribing.

Prosecutable (a.) Capable of being prosecuted; liable to prosecution.

proselytized (imp. & p. p.) of Proselytize

Proselytizer (n.) One who proselytes.

Prosopolepsy (n.) Respect of persons; especially, a premature opinion or prejudice against a person, formed from his external appearance.

Prospectless (a.) Having no prospect.

Prospicience (n.) The act of looking forward.

Prostibulous (a.) Of or pertaining to prostitutes or prostitution; meretricious.

Prostituting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Prostitute

Prostitution (n.) The act or practice of prostituting or offering the body to an indiscriminate intercourse with men; common lewdness of a woman.

Prostitution (n.) The act of setting one's self to sale, or of devoting to infamous purposes what is in one's power; as, the prostitution of abilities; the prostitution of the press.

Protectingly (adv.) By way of protection; in a protective manner.

Protectorate (n.) Government by a protector; -- applied especially to the government of England by Oliver Cromwell.

Protectorate (n.) The authority assumed by a superior power over an inferior or a dependent one, whereby the former protects the latter from invasion and shares in the management of its affairs.

Protectorial (a.) Same as Protectoral.

Protestantly (adv.) Like a Protestant; in conformity with Protestantism.

Protestation (n.) The act of making a protest; a public avowal; a solemn declaration, especially of dissent.

Protestation (n.) Formerly, a declaration in common-law pleading, by which the party interposes an oblique allegation or denial of some fact, protesting that it does or does not exist, and at the same time avoiding a direct affirmation or denial.

Protestingly (adv.) By way of protesting.

Prothalamion (n.) Alt. of Prothalamium

Prothalamium (n.) A song in celebration of a marriage.

Prothonotary (n.) Alt. of Protonotary

Protomorphic (a.) Having the most primitive character; in the earliest form; as, a protomorphic layer of tissue.

Protoplasmic (a.) Of or pertaining to the first formation of living bodies.

Protoplasmic (a.) Of or pertaining to protoplasm; consisting of, or resembling, protoplasm.

Protoplastic (a.) First-formed.

Protozoonite (n.) One of the primary, or first-formed, segments of an embryonic arthropod.

Protracheata (n. pl.) Same as Malacopoda.

Protreptical (a.) Adapted to persuade; hortatory; persuasive.

Protrusively (adv.) In a protrusive manner.

Protuberance (n.) That which is protuberant swelled or pushed beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface; a swelling or tumor on the body; a prominence; a bunch or knob; an elevation.

Protuberancy (n.) The quality or state of being protuberant; protuberance; prominence.

Proventricle (n.) Proventriculus.

Proverbially (adv.) In a proverbial manner; by way of proverb; hence, commonly; universally; as, it is proverbially said; the bee is proverbially busy.

Providential (a.) Effected by, or referable to, divine direction or superintendence; as, the providential contrivance of thing; a providential escape.

Provincially (adv.) In a provincial manner.

Provisioning (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Provision

Provisionary (a.) Provisional.

Provisorship (n.) The office or position of a provisor.

Prudentially (adv.) In a prudential manner; prudently.

Trachelipoda (n.pl.) An extensive artificial group of gastropods comprising all those which have a spiral shell and the foot attached to the base of the neck.

Trachenchyma (n.) A vegetable tissue consisting of tracheae.

Tracheoscopy (n.) Examination of the interior of the trachea by means of a mirror.

Tractability (n.) The quality or state of being tractable or docile; docility; tractableness.

Tractoration (n.) See

Tradescantia (n.) A genus including spiderwort and Wandering Jew.

Tradespeople (n.) People engaged in trade; shopkeepers.

trades union () Alt. of Trade union

Traditionary (a.) Traditional.

Traditionary (n.) One, among the Jews, who acknowledges the authority of traditions, and explains the Scriptures by them.

Traditionist (n.) One who adheres to tradition.

Traducianism (n.) The doctrine that human souls are produced by the act of generation; -- opposed to creationism, and infusionism.

Tragi-comedy (n.) A kind of drama representing some action in which serious and comic scenes are blended; a composition partaking of the nature both of tragedy and comedy.

Trajectories (pl. ) of Trajectory

Tralatitious (a.) Passed along; handed down; transmitted.

Tralatitious (a.) Metaphorical; figurative; not literal.

Tranquilized (imp. & p. p.) of Tranquillize

Tranquillize (v. t.) To render tranquil; to allay when agitated; to compose; to make calm and peaceful; as, to tranquilize a state disturbed by factions or civil commotions; to tranquilize the mind.

Tranquilizer (n.) Alt. of Tranquillizer

Tranquillity (n.) The quality or state of being tranquil; calmness; composure.

Tranquilness (n.) Quality or state of being tranquil.

Transanimate (v. t.) To animate with a soul conveyed from another body.

Transaudient (a.) Permitting the passage of sound.

Transcalency (n.) The quality or state of being transcalent.

Transcending (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transcend

Transcendent (a.) Very excellent; superior or supreme in excellence; surpassing others; as, transcendent worth; transcendent valor.

Transcendent (a.) Transcending, or reaching beyond, the limits of human knowledge; -- applied to affirmations and speculations concerning what lies beyond the reach of the human intellect.

Transcension (n.) The act of transcending, or surpassing; also, passage over.

Transcolated (imp. & p. p.) of Transcolate

Transcribing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transcribe

Transcursion (n.) A rambling or ramble; a passage over bounds; an excursion.

Transdialect (v. t.) To change or translate from one dialect into another.

Transduction (n.) The act of conveying over.

Transelement (v. t.) Alt. of Transelementate

Transferring (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transfer

Transferable (a.) Capable of being transferred or conveyed from one place or person to another.

Transferable (a.) Negotiable, as a note, bill of exchange, or other evidence of property, that may be conveyed from one person to another by indorsement or other writing; capable of being transferred with no loss of value; as, the stocks of most public companies are transferable; some tickets are not transferable.

Transference (n.) The act of transferring; conveyance; passage; transfer.

Transfigured (imp. & p. p.) of Transfigure

Transforming (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transform

Transformism (n.) The hypothesis, or doctrine, that living beings have originated by the modification of some other previously existing forms of living matter; -- opposed to abiogenesis.

Transfreight (v. i.) To transfrete.

Transfusible (a.) Capable of being transfused; transferable by transfusion.

Transgressed (imp. & p. p.) of Transgress

Transgressor (n.) One who transgresses; one who breaks a law, or violates a command; one who violates any known rule or principle of rectitude; a sinner.

Transhipment (n.) Same as Transshipment.

Transilience (n.) Alt. of Transiliency

Transiliency (n.) A leap across or from one thing to another.

Transitional (a.) Of or pertaining to transition; involving or denoting transition; as, transitional changes; transitional stage.

Transitorily (adv.) In a transitory manner; with brief continuance.

Translatable (a.) Capable of being translated, or rendered into another language.

Translatress (n.) A woman who translates.

Translucence (n.) Alt. of Translucency

Translucency (n.) The quality or state of being translucent; clearness; partial transparency.

Transmeation (n.) The act of transmeating; a passing through or beyond.

Transmigrant (a.) Migrating or passing from one place or state to another; passing from one residence to another.

Transmigrant (n.) One who transmigrates.

Transmigrate (v. i.) To pass from one country or jurisdiction to another for the purpose of residence, as men or families; to migrate.

Transmigrate (v. i.) To pass from one body or condition into another.

Transmission (n.) The act of transmitting, or the state of being transmitted; as, the transmission of letters, writings, papers, news, and the like, from one country to another; the transmission of rights, titles, or privileges, from father to son, or from one generation to another.

Transmission (n.) The right possessed by an heir or legatee of transmitting to his successor or successors any inheritance, legacy, right, or privilege, to which he is entitled, even if he should die without enjoying or exercising it.

Transmissive (a.) Capable of being transmitted; derived, or handed down, from one to another.

Transmitting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transmit

Transmogrify (v. t.) To change into a different shape; to transform.

Transmutable (a.) Capable of being transmuted or changed into a different substance, or into into something of a different form a nature; transformable.

Transparence (n.) The quality or state of being transparent; transparency.

Transparency (n.) The quality or condition of being transparent; transparence.

Transparency (n.) That which is transparent; especially, a picture painted on thin cloth or glass, or impressed on porcelain, or the like, to be viewed by natural or artificial light, which shines through it.

Transpeciate (v. t.) To change from one species to another; to transform.

Transpicuous (a.) Transparent; pervious to the sight.

Transpierced (imp. & p. p.) of Transpierce

Transpirable (a.) Capable of being transpired, or of transpiring.

Transplacing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transplace

Transplanted (imp. & p. p.) of Transplant

Transplanter (n.) One who transplants; also, a machine for transplanting trees.

Transporting (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transport

Transportant (a.) Transporting; /avishing; as, transportant love.

Transporting (a.) That transports; fig., ravishing.

Transposable (a.) That may transposed; as, a transposable phrase.

Transshaping (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transshape

Transudation (n.) The act or process of transuding.

Transudation (n.) Same as Exosmose.

Transudatory (a.) Of or pertaining to transudation; passing by transudation.

Transumption (n.) Act of taking from one place to another.

Transumptive (a.) Taking from one to another; metaphorical.

Transvection (n.) The act of conveying or carrying over.

Transversing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Transverse

Transversely (adv.) In a transverse manner.

Transversion (n.) The act of changing from prose into verse, or from verse into prose.

Tread-softly (n.) Spurge nettle. See under Nettle.

Trencher-men (pl. ) of Trencher-man

Trencher-man (n.) A feeder; a great eater; a gormandizer.

Trencher-man (n.) A cook.

Trencher-man (n.) A table companion; a trencher mate.

Triadelphous (a.) Having stamens joined by filaments into three bundles. See Illust. under Adelphous.

Triangulares (n. pl.) The triangular, or maioid, crabs. See Illust. under Maioid, and Illust. of Spider crab, under Spider.

Triangularly (adv.) In a triangular manner; in the form of a triangle.

Triangulated (imp. & p. p.) of Triangulate

Tribracteate (a.) Having three bracts.

Tribunitious (a.) Tribunician; tribunitial.

Tricarbimide (n.) See under Cyanuric.

Tricentenary (a.) Including, or relating to, the interval of three hundred years; tercentenary.

Tricentenary (n.) A period of three centuries, or three hundred years, also, the three-hundredth anniversary of any event; a tercentenary.

Trichiniasis (n.) Trichinosis.

Trichomatose (a.) Affected with a disease which causes agglutination and matting together; -- said of the hair when affected with plica. See Plica, 1.

Trichopteran () One of the Trichoptera.

Trichotomous (a.) Divided into three parts, or into threes; three-forked; as, a trichotomous stem.

Trichromatic (a.) Having or existing in three different phases of color; having three distinct color varieties; -- said of certain birds and insects.

Tricorporate (a.) Represented with three bodies conjoined to one head, as a lion.

Tricuspidate (a.) Three-pointed; ending in three points; as, a tricuspidate leaf.

Tridactylous (a.) Tridactyl.

Trifallowing (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Trifallow

Trifasciated (a.) Having, or surrounded by, three fasciae, or bands.

Trifistulary (a.) Having three pipes.

Trifoliolate (a.) Having three leaflets.

Triglyceride (n.) A glyceride formed by the replacement of three hydrogen atoms in glycerin by acid radicals.

Triglyphical (a.) Consisting of, or pertaining to, triglyphs.

Triglyphical (a.) Containing three sets of characters or sculptures.

Trigonometry (n.) That branch of mathematics which treats of the relations of the sides and angles of triangles, which the methods of deducing from certain given parts other required parts, and also of the general relations which exist between the trigonometrical functions of arcs or angles.

Trigonometry (n.) A treatise in this science.

Trigrammatic (a.) Containing three letters or characters, or three sets of letters or characters.

Trimaculated (a.) Marked with three spots, or maculae.

Trimethylene (n.) A gaseous hydrocarbon, C3H6, isomeric with propylene and obtained from it indirectly. It is the base of a series of compounds analogous to the aromatic hydrocarbons.

Tripalmitate (n.) A palmitate derived from three molecules of palmitic acid.

Tripartitely (adv.) In a tripartite manner.

Tripartition (n.) A division by threes, or into three parts; the taking of a third part of any number or quantity.

Triphthongal (a.) Of or pertaining to a triphthong; consisting of three vowel sounds pronounced together in a single syllable.

Triplication (n.) The act of tripling, or making threefold, or adding three together.

Triplication (n.) Same as Surrejoinder.

Tripudiation (n.) The act of dancing.

Tristigmatic (a.) Alt. of Tristigmatose

Triumphantly (adv.) In a triumphant manner.

Trivialities (pl. ) of Triviality

Trochanteric (a.) Of or pertaining to one or both of the trochanters.

Trochilidist (n.) One who studies, or is versed in, the nature and habits of humming birds, or the Trochilidae.

Trochosphere (n.) A young larval form of many annelids, mollusks, and bryozoans, in which a circle of cilia is developed around the anterior end.

Trollmydames (n.) The game of nineholes.

Tropological (a.) Characterized by tropes; varied by tropes; tropical.

Trou-de-loup (n.) A pit in the form of an inverted cone or pyramid, constructed as an obstacle to the approach of an enemy, and having a pointed stake in the middle. The pits are called also trapholes.

Trough-shell (n.) Any bivalve shell of the genus Mactra. See Mactra.

Trucebreaker (n.) One who violates a truce, covenant, or engagement.

True-hearted (a.) Of a faithful heart; honest; sincere; not faithless or deceitful; as, a truhearted friend.

Trullization (n.) The act of laying on coats of plaster with a trowel.

Truncheoneer (n.) A person armed with a truncheon.

Truth-teller (n.) One who tells the truth.

Uranographic (a.) Alt. of Uranographical

Urethroscope (n.) An instrument for viewing the interior of the urethra.

Urethroscopy (n.) Examination of the urethra by means of the urethroscope.

Urinogenital (a.) Pertaining to the urinary and genital organs; genitourinary; urogenital; as, the urinogenital canal.

Wranglership (n.) The honor or position of being a wrangler at the University of Cambridge, England.

Wreath-shell (n.) A marine shell of the genus Turbo. See Turbo.

Wreck-master (n.) A person appointed by law to take charge of goods, etc., thrown on shore after a shipwreck.

Wretchedness (n.) The quality or state of being wretched; utter misery.

Wretchedness (n.) A wretched object; anything despicably.



Sours: http://www.learnenglishnow.com/12_letter_words_whose_second_letter_is_r.html

What words have S as the second letter?

rakee.

Are there 4 letters and a second letter?

4 Letters And Second Letter Is A – You Go Words! Four letter words, and second letter a. List of 633 words that are 4 letters and second letter is a. Add length, consonants, vowels, syllables, origin, spelling and more. View word search examples. Learn how to use the easiest words finder here.

Are there any words with your as the second letter?

List of all 4-letter words with R as second letter. There are 276 four-letter words with R as second letter: ARAK ARAR ARBA WRAP WREN WRIT. Every word on this site can be played in scrabble.

Which is an example of a 4 Letter Word?

Examples include ECRU, EELS, EERY, and ECHO. When it comes to 4 letter words starting with A, the same “get rid of excess vowels” trick applies. Some of the good words that will fulfill this include AGUE, AAHS, AERO, and ALAE.

When to use s or s in 4 letter words?

In the beginning and midgame, you will play more 4 letter words than any other, often using an S to make both the word you’re playing and another word into plurals. Four letter words can also help you get rid of less-than-optimal letters and then restore rack balance.

4 Letters And Second Letter Is A – You Go Words! Four letter words, and second letter a. List of 633 words that are 4 letters and second letter is a. Add length, consonants, vowels, syllables, origin, spelling and more. View word search examples. Learn how to use the easiest words finder here.

List of all 4-letter words with R as second letter. There are 276 four-letter words with R as second letter: ARAK ARAR ARBA WRAP WREN WRIT. Every word on this site can be played in scrabble.

How to make a list of 4 letter words?

Above are the results of unscrambling 4 letter words. Using the word generator and word unscrambler for the letters 4 L E T T E R W O R D S, we unscrambled the letters to create a list of all the words found in Scrabble, Words with Friends, and Text Twist. We found a total of 3989 words by unscrambling the letters in 4 letter words.

How to unscramble 4 letter words in Scrabble?

Using the word generator and word unscrambler for the letters 4 L E T T E R W O R D S, we unscrambled the letters to create a list of all the words found in Scrabble, Words with Friends, and Text Twist. We found a total of 3989 words by unscrambling the letters in 4 letter words.

5 Letters and Second Letter Is R

WordLengthOrigin
Truth5Middle English
Train5Middle English
Brain5Middle English
Fruit5Middle English

What words start with OS?

13-letter words that start with os

  • osteomyelitis.
  • osteomalacias.
  • osteosarcomas.
  • osteoplasties.
  • ossifications.
  • oscillographs.
  • oscillography.
  • oscillational.

    What four letter words start with A and end with a?

    4-letter words ending with A

    AAAAaada
    albaalfa
    algaalma
    AltaAlva
    Ambaamia
Sours: https://boardgamestips.com/miniature-games/what-words-have-s-as-the-second-letter/
  1. Stop and shop peekskill ny
  2. Flesh and blood price list
  3. Cabins boulder junction, wi
  4. Love story cabin broken bow
  5. Imac turns on then off

All 6-letter words with as second letter

Home  |  All words  |  Beginning with  |  Ending with  |  Containing AB  |  Containing A & B  |  At position


Click to change the position in the word, from the start
1st   3rd   4th   5th   6th

Click to change the position in the word, from the end
1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th

Click to change the letter

Click to change word size
All alphabetical   All by size   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15


There are 1530 six-letter words with R as second letter

ARAARA ARABAS ARABIC ARABIN ARABIS ARABLE ARAISE ARALIA ARAMES ARAMID ARAYSE ARBORS ARBOUR ARBUTE ARCADE ARCANA ARCANE ARCCOS ARCHED ARCHEI ARCHER ARCHES ARCHIL ARCHLY ARCHON ARCING ARCKED ARCMIN ARCSEC ARCSIN ARCTAN ARCTIC ARDEBS ARDENT ARDORS ARDOUR ARDRIS AREACH AREADS ARECAS AREDES ARENAS ARENES AREOLA AREOLE AREPAS ARETES ARETTS ARGALA ARGALI ARGALS ARGAND ARGANS ARGENT ARGHAN ARGILS ARGLED ARGLES ARGOLS ARGONS ARGOSY ARGOTS ARGUED ARGUER ARGUES ARGUFY ARGULI ARGUTE ARGYLE ARGYLL ARHATS ARIARY ARIDER ARIDLY ARIELS ARIGHT ARILED ARILLI ARIOSE ARIOSI ARIOSO ARISEN ARISES ARISTA ARISTO ARKING ARKITE ARKOSE ARLING ARMADA ARMERS ARMETS ARMFUL ARMIES ARMILS ARMING ARMLET ARMORS ARMORY ARMOUR ARMPIT ARMURE ARNICA ARNUTS AROBAS AROHAS AROIDS AROINT AROLLA AROMAS AROUND AROUSE AROYNT ARPENS ARPENT ARRACK ARRANT ARRAYS ARREAR ARRECT ARREST ARRETS ARRIBA ARRIDE ARRISH ARRIVE ARROBA ARROWS ARROWY ARROYO ARSENO ARSHIN ARSIER ARSINE ARSING ARSINO ARSONS ARTELS ARTERY ARTFUL ARTICS ARTIER ARTIES ARTILY ARTIST BRAAIS BRAATA BRACED BRACER BRACES BRACHS BRACKS BRACTS BRAGGY BRAGLY BRAHMA BRAIDE BRAIDS BRAILS BRAINS BRAINY BRAIRD BRAISE BRAIZE BRAKED BRAKES BRAMES BRANCH BRANDS BRANDY BRANKS BRANKY BRANLE BRANNY BRANTS BRASCO BRASES BRASHY BRASIL BRASSY BRASTS BRATTY BRAVAS BRAVED BRAVER BRAVES BRAVOS BRAWER BRAWLS BRAWLY BRAWNS BRAWNY BRAYED BRAYER BRAZAS BRAZED BRAZEN BRAZER BRAZES BRAZIL BREACH BREADS BREADY BREAKS BREAMS BREARE BREAST BREATH BREDED BREDES BREDIE BREECH BREEDS BREEKS BREERS BREESE BREEST BREEZE BREEZY BREGMA BREHON BREIDS BREIST BREKKY BRENNE BRENTS BRERES BRETON BREVES BREVET BREVIS BREWED BREWER BREWIS BREYED BRIARD BRIARS BRIARY BRIBED BRIBEE BRIBER BRIBES BRICHT BRICKS BRICKY BRIDAL BRIDED BRIDES BRIDGE BRIDIE BRIDLE BRIEFS BRIERS BRIERY BRIGHT BRIGUE BRILLO BRILLS BRINED BRINER BRINES BRINGS BRINKS BRINNY BRIONY BRISES BRISKS BRISKY BRITHS BRITTS BRIZES BROACH BROADS BROCHE BROCHO BROCHS BROCKS BROGAN BROGHS BROGUE BROILS BROKED BROKEN BROKER BROKES BROLGA BROLLY BROMAL BROMES BROMIC BROMID BROMIN BROMOS BRONCO BRONCS BRONDS BRONZE BRONZY BROOCH BROODS BROODY BROOKS BROOLS BROOMS BROOMY BROOSE BROSES BROTHS BROTHY BROUGH BROUZE BROWED BROWNS BROWNY BROWSE BROWST BROWSY BRUCIN BRUGHS BRUINS BRUISE BRUITS BRULES BRULOT BRUMAL BRUMBY BRUMES BRUNCH BRUNET BRUNTS BRUSHY BRUSTS BRUTAL BRUTED BRUTER BRUTES BRUXED BRUXES BRYONY CRAALS CRABBY CRACKA CRACKS CRACKY CRADLE CRAFTS CRAFTY CRAGGY CRAICS CRAIGS CRAKED CRAKES CRAMBE CRAMBO CRAMES CRAMPS CRAMPY CRANCH CRANED CRANES CRANIA CRANKS CRANKY CRANNY CRANTS CRAPED CRAPES CRAPLE CRAPPY CRARES CRASES CRASIS CRATCH CRATED CRATER CRATES CRATON CRATUR CRAVAT CRAVED CRAVEN CRAVER CRAVES CRAWLS CRAWLY CRAYER CRAYON CRAZED CRAZES CREACH CREAGH CREAKS CREAKY CREAMS CREAMY CREANT CREASE CREASY CREATE CRECHE CREDAL CREDIT CREDOS CREEDS CREEKS CREEKY CREELS CREEPS CREEPY CREESE CREESH CREMES CREMOR CRENAS CRENEL CREOLE CREPED CREPES CREPEY CREPON CRESOL CRESSY CRESTA CRESTS CRESYL CRETIC CRETIN CREWED CREWEL CREWES CRIANT CRIBLE CRICKS CRICKY CRIERS CRIKEY CRIMED CRIMEN CRIMES CRIMPS CRIMPY CRINAL CRINED CRINES CRINGE CRINUM CRIPES CRISES CRISIC CRISIS CRISPS CRISPY CRISSA CRISTA CRITHS CRITIC CROAKS CROAKY CROCHE CROCKS CROCUS CROFTS CROGGY CROJIK CROMBS CROMED CROMES CRONES CRONET CROOKS CROOLS CROONS CROOVE CROPPY CRORES CROSSE CROTAL CROTCH CROTON CROUCH CROUPE CROUPS CROUPY CROUSE CROUTE CROUTS CROWDS CROWDY CROWEA CROWED CROWER CROWNS CROZER CROZES CRUCES CRUCKS CRUDDY CRUDER CRUDES CRUELS CRUETS CRUISE CRUIVE CRUMBS CRUMBY CRUMEN CRUMMY CRUMPS CRUMPY CRUNCH CRUORS CRURAL CRUSES CRUSET CRUSIE CRUSTA CRUSTS CRUSTY CRUTCH CRUVES CRUXES CRUZIE CRWTHS CRYING CRYPTO CRYPTS DRABBY DRABLY DRACHM DRAFFS DRAFFY DRAFTS DRAFTY DRAGEE DRAGGY DRAGON DRAILS DRAINS DRAKES DRAMAS DRANTS DRAPED DRAPER DRAPES DRAPET DRAPEY DRAPPY DRAUNT DRAWEE DRAWER DRAWLS DRAWLY DRAYED DRAZEL DREADS DREAMS DREAMT DREAMY DREARE DREARS DREARY DRECKS DRECKY DREDGE DREGGY DREICH DREIDL DREIGH DRENCH DRERES DRESSY DRICES DRIEGH DRIERS DRIEST DRIFTS DRIFTY DRILLS DRINKS DRIPPY DRIVEL DRIVEN DRIVER DRIVES DROGER DROGUE DROICH DROIDS DROILS DROITS DROLER DROLES DROLLS DROLLY DROMES DROMIC DROMOI DROMON DROMOS DRONED DRONER DRONES DRONGO DROOBS DROOGS DROOKS DROOLS DROOLY DROOME DROOPS DROOPY DROPSY DROSKY DROSSY DROUKS DROUTH DROVED DROVER DROVES DROWND DROWNS DROWSE DROWSY DRUDGE DRUGGY DRUIDS DRUMLY DRUMMY DRUNKS DRUPEL DRUPES DRUSES DRYADS DRYERS DRYEST DRYING DRYISH DRYLOT ERASED ERASER ERASES ERBIAS ERBIUM ERECTS EREMIC ERENOW ERGATE ERGONS ERGOTS ERIACH ERICAS ERICKS ERINGO ERINUS ERLANG ERMINE ERNING ERODED ERODES EROSES EROTIC ERRAND ERRANT ERRATA ERRING ERRORS ERSATZ ERUCIC ERUCTS ERUGOS ERUPTS ERUVIM ERUVIN ERVILS ERYNGO FRACAS FRACTI FRACTS FRAENA FRAGOR FRAILS FRAIMS FRAISE FRAMED FRAMER FRAMES FRANCO FRANCS FRANKS FRANZY FRAPPE FRATCH FRATER FRATRY FRAUDS FRAYED FRAZIL FREAKS FREAKY FREELY FREERS FREEST FREETS FREETY FREEZE FREITS FREITY FREMDS FREMIT FRENCH FRENNE FRENUM FRENZY FREONS FRERES

Pages:   1   2   3

Words in black are found in both the twl06 and the sowpods dictionaries; words in red are only in the sowpods dictionary.

Edit List

See this list for:



Recommended websites

Sours: https://www.bestwordlist.com/p/r/1/words6letterssecondletterr.htm
Letter R-Things that begins with alphabet R-words starts with R-Objects that starts with letter R

4 letter words whose second letter is R

Arab (n.) One of a swarthy race occupying Arabia, and numerous in Syria, Northern Africa, etc.

Arak (n.) Same as Arrack.

Arch (n.) Any part of a curved

Arch (n.) Usually a curved member made up of separate wedge-shaped solids, with the joints between them disposed in the direction of the radii of the curve; used to support the wall or other weight above an opening. In this sense arches are segmental, round (i. e., semicircular), or pointed.

Arch (n.) A flat arch is a member constructed of stones cut into wedges or other shapes so as to support each other without rising in a curve.

Arch (n.) Any place covered by an arch; an archway; as, to pass into the arch of a bridge.

Arch (n.) Any curvature in the form of an arch; as, the arch of the aorta.

Arch (v. t.) To cover with an arch or arches.

Arch (v. t.) To form or bend into the shape of an arch.

Arch (v. i.) To form into an arch; to curve.

Arch (a.) Chief; eminent; greatest; principal.

Arch (a.) Cunning or sly; sportively mischievous; roguish; as, an arch look, word, lad.

Arch (n.) A chief.

-gos (pl. ) of Archipelago

-ard () Alt. of -art

-art () The termination of many English words; as, coward, reynard, drunkard, mostly from the French, in which language this ending is of German origin, being orig. the same word as English hard. It usually has the sense of one who has to a high or excessive degree the quality expressed by the root; as, braggart, sluggard.

Area (n.) Any plane surface, as of the floor of a room or church, or of the ground within an inclosure; an open space in a building.

Area (n.) The inclosed space on which a building stands.

Area (n.) The sunken space or court, giving ingress and affording light to the basement of a building.

Area (n.) An extent of surface; a tract of the earth's surface; a region; as, vast uncultivated areas.

Area (n.) The superficial contents of any figure; the surface included within any given

Area (n.) A spot or small marked space; as, the germinative area.

Area (n.) Extent; scope; range; as, a wide area of thought.

Aret (v. t.) To reckon; to ascribe; to impute.

Arew (adv.) In a row.

Argo (n.) The name of the ship which carried Jason and his fifty-four companions to Colchis, in quest of the Golden Fleece.

Argo (n.) A large constellation in the southern hemisphere, called also Argo Navis. In modern astronomy it is replaced by its three divisions, Carina, Puppis, and Vela.

Aria (n.) An air or song; a melody; a tune.

Arid (a.) Exhausted of moisture; parched with heat; dry; barren.

Aril (n.) Alt. of Arillus

Arms (n.) Instruments or weapons of offense or defense.

Arms (n.) The deeds or exploits of war; military service or science.

Arms (n.) Anything which a man takes in his hand in anger, to strike or assault another with; an aggressive weapon.

Arms (n.) The ensigns armorial of a family, consisting of figures and colors borne in shields, banners, etc., as marks of dignity and distinction, and descending from father to son.

Arms (n.) The legs of a hawk from the thigh to the foot.

Army (n.) A collection or body of men armed for war, esp. one organized in companies, battalions, regiments, brigades, and divisions, under proper officers.

Army (n.) A body of persons organized for the advancement of a cause; as, the Blue Ribbon Army.

Army (n.) A great number; a vast multitude; a host.

Arna (n.) Alt. of Arnee

Arow (adv.) In a row,

Arse (n.) The buttocks, or hind part of an animal; the posteriors; the fundament; the bottom.

Arum (n.) A genus of plants found in central Europe and about the Mediterranean, having flowers on a spadix inclosed in a spathe. The cuckoopint of the English is an example.

Brad (n.) A thin nail, usually small, with a slight projection at the top on one side instead of a head; also, a small wire nail, with a flat circular head; sometimes, a small, tapering, square-bodied finishing nail, with a countersunk head.

Brae (n.) A hillside; a slope; a bank; a hill.

Brag (v. i.) To talk about one's self, or things pertaining to one's self, in a manner intended to excite admiration, envy, or wonder; to talk boastfully; to boast; -- often followed by of; as, to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money, or of the great things one intends to do.

Brag (v. t.) To boast of.

Brag (n.) A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretense or self glorification.

Brag (n.) The thing which is boasted of.

Brag (n.) A game at cards similar to bluff.

Brag (v. i.) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.

Brag (adv.) Proudly; boastfully.

ical (a.) Of or pertaining to the Brahmans or to their doctrines and worship.

Bran (n.) The broken coat of the seed of wheat, rye, or other cereal grain, separated from the flour or meal by sifting or bolting; the coarse, chaffy part of ground grain.

Bran (n.) The European carrion crow.

Brat (n.) A coarse garment or cloak; also, coarse clothing, in general.

Brat (n.) A coarse kind of apron for keeping the clothes clean; a bib.

Brat (n.) A child; an offspring; -- formerly used in a good sense, but now usually in a contemptuous sense.

Brat (n.) The young of an animal.

Brat (n.) A thin bed of coal mixed with pyrites or carbonate of lime.

Bray (v. t.) To pound, beat, rub, or grind small or fine.

Bray (v. i.) To utter a loud, harsh cry, as an ass.

Bray (v. i.) To make a harsh, grating, or discordant noise.

Bray (v. t.) To make or utter with a loud, discordant, or harsh and grating sound.

Bray (n.) The harsh cry of an ass; also, any harsh, grating, or discordant sound.

Bray (n.) A bank; the slope of a hill; a hill. See Brae, which is now the usual spelling.

Bred () imp. & p. p. of Breed.

Bred (imp. & p. p.) of Breed

Bren (v. t. & i.) Alt. of Brenne

Bren (n.) Bran.

Bret (n.) See Birt.

Brew (v. t.) To boil or seethe; to cook.

Brew (v. t.) To prepare, as beer or other liquor, from malt and hops, or from other materials, by steeping, boiling, and fermentation.

Brew (v. t.) To prepare by steeping and mingling; to concoct.

Brew (v. t.) To foment or prepare, as by brewing; to contrive; to plot; to concoct; to hatch; as, to brew mischief.

Brew (v. i.) To attend to the business, or go through the processes, of brewing or making beer.

Brew (v. i.) To be in a state of preparation; to be mixing, forming, or gathering; as, a storm brews in the west.

Brew (n.) The mixture formed by brewing; that which is brewed.

Brid (n.) A bird.

Brig (n.) A bridge.

Brig (n.) A two-masted, square-rigged vessel.

Brim (n.) The rim, border, or upper edge of a cup, dish, or any hollow vessel used for holding anything.

Brim (n.) The edge or margin, as of a fountain, or of the water contained in it; the brink; border.

Brim (n.) The rim of a hat.

Brim (v. i.) To be full to the brim.

Brim (v. t.) To fill to the brim, upper edge, or top.

Brim (a.) Fierce; sharp; cold. See Breme.

Brin (n.) One of the radiating sticks of a fan. The outermost are larger and longer, and are called panaches.

Brit (n.) Alt. of Britt

Brob (n.) A peculiar brad-shaped spike, to be driven alongside the end of an abutting timber to prevent its slipping.

Brog (n.) A pointed instrument, as a joiner's awl, a brad awl, a needle, or a small sharp stick.

Brog (v. t.) To prod with a pointed instrument, as a lance; also, to broggle.

Brow (n.) The prominent ridge over the eye, with the hair that covers it, forming an arch above the orbit.

Brow (n.) The hair that covers the brow (ridge over the eyes); the eyebrow.

Brow (n.) The forehead; as, a feverish brow.

Brow (n.) The general air of the countenance.

Brow (n.) The edge or projecting upper part of a steep place; as, the brow of a precipice; the brow of a hill.

Brow (v. t.) To bound to limit; to be at, or form, the edge of.

Bruh (n.) The rhesus monkey. See Rhesus.

Brun (n.) Same as Brun, a brook.

Brut (n.) To browse.

Brut (n.) See Birt.

Crab (n.) One of the brachyuran Crustacea. They are mostly marine, and usually have a broad, short body, covered with a strong shell or carapace. The abdomen is small and curled up beneath the body.

Crab (n.) The zodiacal constellation Cancer.

Crab (a.) A crab apple; -- so named from its harsh taste.

Crab (a.) A cudgel made of the wood of the crab tree; a crabstick.

Crab (a.) A movable winch or windlass with powerful gearing, used with derricks, etc.

Crab (a.) A form of windlass, or geared capstan, for hauling ships into dock, etc.

Crab (a.) A machine used in ropewalks to stretch the yarn.

Crab (a.) A claw for anchoring a portable machine.

Crab (v. t.) To make sour or morose; to embitter.

Crab (v. t.) To beat with a crabstick.

Crab (v. i.) To drift sidewise or to leeward, as a vessel.

Crab (a.) Sour; rough; austere.

Crag (n.) A steep, rugged rock; a rough, broken cliff, or point of a rock, on a ledge.

Crag (n.) A partially compacted bed of gravel mixed with shells, of the Tertiary age.

Crag (n.) The neck or throat

Crag (n.) The neck piece or scrag of mutton.

Cram (v. t.) To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrusting one thing into another; to stuff; to crowd; to fill to superfluity; as, to cram anything into a basket; to cram a room with people.

Cram (v. t.) To fill with food to satiety; to stuff.

Cram (v. t.) To put hastily through an extensive course of memorizing or study, as in preparation for an examination; as, a pupil is crammed by his tutor.

Cram (v. i.) To eat greedily, and to satiety; to stuff.

Cram (v. i.) To make crude preparation for a special occasion, as an examination, by a hasty and extensive course of memorizing or study.

Cram (n.) The act of cramming.

Cram (n.) Information hastily memorized; as, a cram from an examination.

Cram (n.) A warp having more than two threads passing through each dent or split of the reed.

Cran (n.) Alt. of Crane

Craw (n.) The crop of a bird.

Craw (n.) The stomach of an animal.

Cray (n.) Alt. of Crayer

Crew (n.) The Manx shearwater.

Crew (n.) A company of people associated together; an assemblage; a throng.

Crew (n.) The company of seamen who man a ship, vessel, or at; the company belonging to a vessel or a boat.

Crew (n.) In an extended sense, any small body of men associated for a purpose; a gang; as (Naut.), the carpenter's crew; the boatswain's crew.

Crew () imp. of Crow

Crib (n.) A manger or rack; a feeding place for animals.

Crib (n.) A stall for oxen or other cattle.

Crib (n.) A small inclosed bedstead or cot for a child.

Crib (n.) A box or bin, or similar wooden structure, for storing grain, salt, etc.; as, a crib for corn or oats.

Crib (n.) A hovel; a hut; a cottage.

Crib (n.) A structure or frame of timber for a foundation, or for supporting a roof, or for lining a shaft.

Crib (n.) A structure of logs to be anchored with stones; -- used for docks, pier, dams, etc.

Crib (n.) A small raft of timber.

Crib (n.) A small theft; anything purloined;; a plagiaris/; hence, a translation or key, etc., to aid a student in preparing or reciting his lessons.

Crib (n.) A miner's luncheon.

Crib (n.) The discarded cards which the dealer can use in scoring points in cribbage.

Crib (v. t.) To shut up or confine in a narrow habitation; to cage; to cramp.

Crib (v. t.) To pilfer or purloin; hence, to steal from an author; to appropriate; to plagiarize; as, to crib a

Crib (v. i.) To crowd together, or to be confined, as in a crib or in narrow accommodations.

Crib (v. i.) To make notes for dishonest use in recitation or examination.

Crib (v. i.) To seize the manger or other solid object with the teeth and draw in wind; -- said of a horse.

Cric (n.) The ring which turns inward and condenses the flame of a lamp.

Crop (n.) The pouchlike enlargement of the gullet of birds, serving as a receptacle for food; the craw.

Crop (n.) The top, end, or highest part of anything, especially of a plant or tree.

Crop (n.) That which is cropped, cut, or gathered from a single felld, or of a single kind of grain or fruit, or in a single season; especially, the product of what is planted in the earth; fruit; harvest.

Crop (n.) Grain or other product of the field while standing.

Crop (n.) Anything cut off or gathered.

Crop (n.) Hair cut close or short, or the act or style of so cutting; as, a convict's crop.

Crop (n.) A projecting ornament in carved stone. Specifically, a finial.

Crop (n.) Tin ore prepared for smelting.

Crop (n.) Outcrop of a vein or seam at the surface.

Crop (n.) A riding whip with a loop instead of a lash.

Crop (v. t.) To cut off the tops or tips of; to bite or pull off; to browse; to pluck; to mow; to reap.

Crop (v. t.) Fig.: To cut off, as if in harvest.

Crop (v. t.) To cause to bear a crop; as, to crop a field.

Crop (v. i.) To yield harvest.

Crew (imp.) of Crow

Crow (v. i.) To make the shrill sound characteristic of a cock, either in joy, gayety, or defiance.

Crow (v. i.) To shout in exultation or defiance; to brag.

Crow (v. i.) To utter a sound expressive of joy or pleasure.

Crow (v. i.) A bird, usually black, of the genus Corvus, having a strong conical beak, with projecting bristles. It has a harsh, croaking note. See Caw.

Crow (v. i.) A bar of iron with a beak, crook, or claw; a bar of iron used as a lever; a crowbar.

Crow (v. i.) The cry of the cock. See Crow, v. i., 1.

Crow (v. i.) The mesentery of a beast; -- so called by butchers.

Crud (n.) See Curd.

Crup (a.) Short; brittle; as, crup cake.

Crup (n.) See Croup, the rump of a horse.

Crus (n.) That part of the hind limb between the femur, or thigh, and the ankle, or tarsus; the shank.

Crus (n.) Often applied, especially in the plural, to parts which are supposed to resemble a pair of legs; as, the crura of the diaphragm, a pair of muscles attached to it; crura cerebri, two bundles of nerve fibers in the base of the brain, connecting the medulla and the forebrain.

Crut (n.) The rough, shaggy part of oak bark.

Crux (n.) Anything that is very puzzling or difficult to explain.

Drab (n.) A low, sluttish woman.

Drab (n.) A lewd wench; a strumpet.

Drab (n.) A wooden box, used in salt works for holding the salt when taken out of the boiling pans.

Drab (v. i.) To associate with strumpets; to wench.

Drab (n.) A kind of thick woolen cloth of a dun, or dull brownish yellow, or dull gray, color; -- called also drabcloth.

Drab (n.) A dull brownish yellow or dull gray color.

Drab (a.) Of a color between gray and brown.

Drab (n.) A drab color.

Drad (p. p. & a.) Dreaded.

Drag (n.) A confection; a comfit; a drug.

Drag (v. t.) To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; -- applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing.

Drag (v. t.) To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag.

Drag (v. t.) To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

Drag (v. i.) To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold.

Drag (v. i.) To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

Drag (v. i.) To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

Drag (v. i.) To fish with a dragnet.

Drag (v. t.) The act of dragging; anything which is dragged.

Drag (v. t.) A net, or an apparatus, to be drawn along the bottom under water, as in fishing, searching for drowned persons, etc.

Drag (v. t.) A kind of sledge for conveying heavy bodies; also, a kind of low car or handcart; as, a stone drag.

Drag (v. t.) A heavy coach with seats on top; also, a heavy carriage.

Drag (v. t.) A heavy harrow, for breaking up ground.

Drag (v. t.) Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used. See Drag sail (below).

Drag (v. t.) Also, a skid or shoe, for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.

Drag (v. t.) Hence, anything that retards; a clog; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.

Drag (v. t.) Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

Drag (v. t.) The bottom part of a flask or mold, the upper part being the cope.

Drag (v. t.) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

Drag (v. t.) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel. See Citation under Drag, v. i., 3.

Dram (n.) A weight; in Apothecaries' weight, one eighth part of an ounce, or sixty grains; in Avoirdupois weight, one sixteenth part of an ounce, or 27.34375 grains.

Dram (n.) A minute quantity; a mite.

Dram (n.) As much spirituous liquor as is usually drunk at once; as, a dram of brandy; hence, a potation or potion; as, a dram of poison.

Dram (n.) A Persian daric.

Dram (v. i. & t.) To drink drams; to ply with drams.

Drew (imp.) of Draw

Draw (v. t.) To cause to move continuously by force applied in advance of the thing moved; to pull along; to haul; to drag; to cause to follow.

Draw (v. t.) To influence to move or tend toward one's self; to exercise an attracting force upon; to call towards itself; to attract; hence, to entice; to allure; to induce.

Draw (v. t.) To cause to come out for one's use or benefit; to extract; to educe; to bring forth; as: (a) To bring or take out, or to let out, from some receptacle, as a stick or post from a hole, water from a cask or well, etc.

Draw (v. t.) To pull from a sheath, as a sword.

Draw (v. t.) To extract; to force out; to elicit; to derive.

Draw (v. t.) To obtain from some cause or origin; to infer from evidence or reasons; to deduce from premises; to derive.

Draw (v. t.) To take or procure from a place of deposit; to call for and receive from a fund, or the like; as, to draw money from a bank.

Draw (v. t.) To take from a box or wheel, as a lottery ticket; to receive from a lottery by the drawing out of the numbers for prizes or blanks; hence, to obtain by good fortune; to win; to gain; as, he drew a prize.

Draw (v. t.) To select by the drawing of lots.

Draw (v. t.) To remove the contents of

Draw (v. t.) To drain by emptying; to suck dry.

Draw (v. t.) To extract the bowels of; to eviscerate; as, to draw a fowl; to hang, draw, and quarter a criminal.

Draw (v. t.) To take into the lungs; to inhale; to inspire; hence, also, to utter or produce by an inhalation; to heave.

Draw (v. t.) To extend in length; to lengthen; to protract; to stretch; to extend, as a mass of metal into wire.

Draw (v. t.) To run, extend, or produce, as a

Draw (v. t.) To represent by

Draw (v. t.) To write in due form; to prepare a draught of; as, to draw a memorial, a deed, or bill of exchange.

Draw (v. t.) To require (so great a depth, as of water) for floating; -- said of a vessel; to sink so deep in (water); as, a ship draws ten feet of water.

Draw (v. t.) To withdraw.

Draw (v. t.) To trace by scent; to track; -- a hunting term.

Draw (v. i.) To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling; as, a horse draws well; the sails of a ship draw well.

Draw (v. i.) To draw a liquid from some receptacle, as water from a well.

Draw (v. i.) To exert an attractive force; to act as an inducement or enticement.

Draw (v. i.) To have efficiency as an epispastic; to act as a sinapism; -- said of a blister, poultice, etc.

Draw (v. i.) To have draught, as a chimney, flue, or the like; to furnish transmission to smoke, gases, etc.

Draw (v. i.) To unsheathe a weapon, especially a sword.

Draw (v. i.) To perform the act, or practice the art, of de

Draw (v. i.) To become contracted; to shrink.

Draw (v. i.) To move; to come or go; literally, to draw one's self; -- with prepositions and adverbs; as, to draw away, to move off, esp. in racing, to get in front; to obtain the lead or increase it; to draw back, to retreat; to draw level, to move up even (with another); to come up to or overtake another; to draw off, to retire or retreat; to draw on, to advance; to draw up, to form in array; to draw near, nigh, or towards, to approach; to draw together, to come together, to collect.

Draw (v. i.) To make a draft or written demand for payment of money deposited or due; -- usually with on or upon.

Draw (v. i.) To admit the action of pulling or dragging; to undergo draught; as, a carriage draws easily.

Draw (v. i.) To sink in water; to require a depth for floating.

Draw (n.) The act of drawing; draught.

Draw (n.) A lot or chance to be drawn.

Draw (n.) A drawn game or battle, etc.

Draw (n.) That part of a bridge which may be raised, swung round, or drawn aside; the movable part of a drawbridge. See the Note under Drawbridge.

Dray (n.) A squirrel's nest.

Dray (n.) A strong low cart or carriage used for heavy burdens.

Dray (n.) A kind of sledge or sled.

Dree (v. t.) To endure; to suffer.

Dree (v. i.) To be able to do or endure.

Dree (a.) Wearisome; tedious.

Dreg (n.) Corrupt or defiling matter contained in a liquid, or precipitated from it; refuse; feculence; lees; grounds; sediment; hence, the vilest and most worthless part of anything; as, the dregs of society.

Drew (imp.) of Draw.

Drey (n.) A squirrel's nest. See Dray.

Drib (v. t.) To do by little and little

Drib (v. t.) To cut off by a little at a time; to crop.

Drib (v. t.) To appropriate unlawfully; to filch; to defalcate.

Drib (v. t.) To lead along step by step; to entice.

Drib (v. t. & i.) To shoot (a shaft) so as to pierce on the descent.

Drib (n.) A drop.

Drie (v. t.) To endure.

Drip (v. i.) To fall in drops; as, water drips from the eaves.

Drip (v. i.) To let fall drops of moisture or liquid; as, a wet garment drips.

Drip (v. t.) To let fall in drops.

Drip (n.) A falling or letting fall in drops; a dripping; that which drips, or falls in drops.

Drip (n.) That part of a cornice, sill course, or other horizontal member, which projects beyond the rest, and is of such section as to throw off the rain water.

Droh (imp.) of Draw.

Drop (n.) The quantity of fluid which falls in one small spherical mass; a liquid globule; a minim; hence, also, the smallest easily measured portion of a fluid; a small quantity; as, a drop of water.

Drop (n.) That which resembles, or that which hangs like, a liquid drop; as a hanging diamond ornament, an earring, a glass pendant on a chandelier, a sugarplum (sometimes medicated), or a kind of shot or slug.

Drop (n.) Same as Gutta.

Drop (n.) Any small pendent ornament.

Drop (n.) Whatever is arranged to drop, hang, or fall from an elevated position; also, a contrivance for lowering something

Drop (n.) A door or platform opening downward; a trap door; that part of the gallows on which a culprit stands when he is to be hanged; hence, the gallows itself.

Drop (n.) A machine for lowering heavy weights, as packages, coal wagons, etc., to a ship's deck.

Drop (n.) A contrivance for temporarily lowering a gas jet.

Drop (n.) A curtain which drops or falls in front of the stage of a theater, etc.

Drop (n.) A drop press or drop hammer.

Drop (n.) The distance of the axis of a shaft below the base of a hanger.

Drop (n.) Any medicine the dose of which is measured by drops; as, lavender drops.

Drop (n.) The depth of a square sail; -- generally applied to the courses only.

Drop (n.) Act of dropping; sudden fall or descent.

Drop (n.) To pour or let fall in drops; to pour in small globules; to distill.

Drop (n.) To cause to fall in one portion, or by one motion, like a drop; to let fall; as, to drop a

Drop (n.) To let go; to dismiss; to set aside; to have done with; to discontinue; to forsake; to give up; to omit.

Drop (n.) To bestow or communicate by a suggestion; to let fall in an indirect, cautious, or gentle manner; as, to drop hint, a word of counsel, etc.

Drop (n.) To lower, as a curtain, or the muzzle of a gun, etc.

Drop (n.) To send, as a letter; as, please drop me a

Drop (n.) To give birth to; as, to drop a lamb.

Drop (n.) To cover with drops; to variegate; to bedrop.

Drop (v. i.) To fall in drops.

Drop (v. i.) To fall, in general, literally or figuratively; as, ripe fruit drops from a tree; wise words drop from the lips.

Drop (v. i.) To let drops fall; to discharge itself in drops.

Drop (v. i.) To fall dead, or to fall in death.

Drop (v. i.) To come to an end; to cease; to pass out of mind; as, the affair dropped.

Drop (v. i.) To come unexpectedly; -- with in or into; as, my old friend dropped in a moment.

Drop (v. i.) To fall or be depressed; to lower; as, the point of the spear dropped a little.

Drop (v. i.) To fall short of a mark.

Drop (v. i.) To be deep in extent; to descend perpendicularly; as, her main topsail drops seventeen yards.

Drow (imp.) of Draw.

Drub (v. t.) To beat with a stick; to thrash; to cudgel.

Drub (n.) A blow with a cudgel; a thump.

Drug (v. i.) To drudge; to toil laboriously.

Drug (n.) A drudge (?).

Drug (n.) Any animal, vegetable, or mineral substance used in the composition of medicines; any stuff used in dyeing or in chemical operations.

Drug (n.) Any commodity that lies on hand, or is not salable; an article of slow sale, or in no demand.

Drug (v. i.) To prescribe or administer drugs or medicines.

Drug (v. t.) To affect or season with drugs or ingredients; esp., to stupefy by a narcotic drug. Also Fig.

Drug (v. t.) To tincture with something offensive or injurious.

Drug (v. t.) To dose to excess with, or as with, drugs.

Drum (n.) An instrument of percussion, consisting either of a hollow cylinder, over each end of which is stretched a piece of skin or vellum, to be beaten with a stick; or of a metallic hemisphere (kettledrum) with a single piece of skin to be so beaten; the common instrument for marking time in martial music; one of the pair of tympani in an orchestra, or cavalry band.

Drum (n.) Anything resembling a drum in form

Drum (n.) A sheet iron radiator, often in the shape of a drum, for warming an apartment by means of heat received from a stovepipe, or a cylindrical receiver for steam, etc.

Drum (n.) A small cylindrical box in which figs, etc., are packed.

Drum (n.) The tympanum of the ear; -- often, but incorrectly, applied to the tympanic membrane.

Drum (n.) One of the cylindrical, or nearly cylindrical, blocks, of which the shaft of a column is composed; also, a vertical wall, whether circular or polygonal in plan, carrying a cupola or dome.

Drum (n.) A cylinder on a revolving shaft, generally for the purpose of driving several pulleys, by means of belts or straps passing around its periphery; also, the barrel of a hoisting machine, on which the rope or chain is wound.

Drum (n.) See Drumfish.

Drum (n.) A noisy, tumultuous assembly of fashionable people at a private house; a rout.

Drum (n.) A tea party; a kettledrum.

Drum (v. i.) To beat a drum with sticks; to beat or play a tune on a drum.

Drum (v. i.) To beat with the fingers, as with drumsticks; to beat with a rapid succession of strokes; to make a noise like that of a beaten drum; as, the ruffed grouse drums with his wings.

Drum (v. i.) To throb, as the heart.

Drum (v. i.) To go about, as a drummer does, to gather recruits, to draw or secure partisans, customers, etc,; -- with for.

Drum (v. t.) To execute on a drum, as a tune.

Drum (v. t.) (With out) To expel ignominiously, with beat of drum; as, to drum out a deserter or rogue from a camp, etc.

Drum (v. t.) (With up) To assemble by, or as by, beat of drum; to collect; to gather or draw by solicitation; as, to drum up recruits; to drum up customers.

Eras (pl. ) of Era

Ergo (conj. / adv.) Therefore; consequently; -- often used in a jocular way.

Eric (n.) A recompense formerly given by a murderer to the relatives of the murdered person.

Erin (n.) An early, and now a poetic, name of Ireland.

Erke (a.) ASlothful.

Erme (v. i.) To grieve; to feel sad.

Erne (n.) A sea eagle, esp. the European white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla).

Eros (n.) Love; the god of love; -- by earlier writers represented as one of the first and creative gods, by later writers as the son of Aphrodite, equivalent to the Latin god Cupid.

Erse (n.) A name sometimes given to that dialect of the Celtic which is spoken in the Highlands of Scotland; -- called, by the Highlanders, Gaelic.

Erse (a.) Of or pertaining to the Celtic race in the Highlands of Scotland, or to their language.

Ersh (n.) See Arrish.

Erst (adv.) First.

Erst (adv.) Previously; before; formerly; heretofore.

Frab (v. i. & t.) To scold; to nag.

Frap (v. t.) To draw together; to bind with a view to secure and strengthen, as a vessel by passing cables around it; to tighten; as a tackle by drawing the

Frap (v. t.) To brace by drawing together, as the cords of a drum.

Fray (n.) Affray; broil; contest; combat.

Fray (v. t.) To frighten; to terrify; to alarm.

Fray (v. t.) To bear the expense of; to defray.

Fray (v. t.) To rub; to wear off, or wear into shreds, by rubbing; to fret, as cloth; as, a deer is said to fray her head.

Fray (v. i.) To rub.

Fray (v. i.) To wear out or into shreads, or to suffer injury by rubbing, as when the threads of the warp or of the woof wear off so that the cross threads are loose; to ravel; as, the cloth frays badly.

Fray (n.) A fret or chafe, as in cloth; a place injured by rubbing.

Fred (n.) Peace; -- a word used in composition, especially in proper names; as, Alfred; Frederic.

Free (superl.) Exempt from subjection to the will of others; not under restraint, control, or compulsion; able to follow one's own impulses, desires, or inclinations; determining one's own course of action; not dependent; at liberty.

Free (superl.) Not under an arbitrary or despotic government; subject only to fixed laws regularly and fairly administered, and defended by them from encroachments upon natural or acquired rights; enjoying political liberty.

Free (superl.) Liberated, by arriving at a certain age, from the control of parents, guardian, or master.

Free (superl.) Not confined or imprisoned; released from arrest; liberated; at liberty to go.

Free (superl.) Not subjected to the laws of physical necessity; capable of voluntary activity; endowed with moral liberty; -- said of the will.

Free (superl.) Clear of offense or crime; guiltless; innocent.

Free (superl.) Unconstrained by timidity or distrust; unreserved; ingenuous; frank; familiar; communicative.

Free (superl.) Unrestrained; immoderate; lavish; licentious; -- used in a bad sense.

Free (superl.) Not close or parsimonious; liberal; open-handed; lavish; as, free with his money.

Free (superl.) Exempt; clear; released; liberated; not encumbered or troubled with; as, free from pain; free from a burden; -- followed by from, or, rarely, by of.

Free (superl.) Characteristic of one acting without restraint; charming; easy.

Free (superl.) Ready; eager; acting without spurring or whipping; spirited; as, a free horse.

Free (superl.) Invested with a particular freedom or franchise; enjoying certain immunities or privileges; admitted to special rights; -- followed by of.

Free (superl.) Thrown open, or made accessible, to all; to be enjoyed without limitations; unrestricted; not obstructed, engrossed, or appropriated; open; -- said of a thing to be possessed or enjoyed; as, a free school.

Free (superl.) Not gained by importunity or purchase; gratuitous; spontaneous; as, free admission; a free gift.

Free (superl.) Not arbitrary or despotic; assuring liberty; defending individual rights against encroachment by any person or class; instituted by a free people; -- said of a government, institutions, etc.

Free (superl.) Certain or honorable; the opposite of base; as, free service; free socage.

Free (superl.) Privileged or individual; the opposite of common; as, a free fishery; a free warren.

Free (superl.) Not united or combined with anything else; separated; dissevered; unattached; at liberty to escape; as, free carbonic acid gas; free cells.

Free (adv.) Freely; willingly.

Free (adv.) Without charge; as, children admitted free.

Free (a.) To make free; to set at liberty; to rid of that which confines, limits, embarrasses, oppresses, etc.; to release; to disengage; to clear; -- followed by from, and sometimes by off; as, to free a captive or a slave; to be freed of these inconveniences.

Free (a.) To remove, as something that confines or bars; to relieve from the constraint of.

Free (a.) To frank.

Fren (a.) A stranger.

Fret (n.) See 1st Frith.

Fret (v. t.) To devour.

Fret (v. t.) To rub; to wear away by friction; to chafe; to gall; hence, to eat away; to gnaw; as, to fret cloth; to fret a piece of gold or other metal; a worm frets the plants of a ship.

Fret (v. t.) To impair; to wear away; to diminish.

Fret (v. t.) To make rough, agitate, or disturb; to cause to ripple; as, to fret the surface of water.

Fret (v. t.) To tease; to irritate; to vex.

Fret (v. i.) To be worn away; to chafe; to fray; as, a wristband frets on the edges.

Fret (v. i.) To eat in; to make way by corrosion.

Fret (v. i.) To be agitated; to be in violent commotion; to rankle; as, rancor frets in the malignant breast.

Fret (v. i.) To be vexed; to be chafed or irritated; to be angry; to utter peevish expressions.

Fret (n.) The agitation of the surface of a fluid by fermentation or other cause; a rippling on the surface of water.

Fret (n.) Agitation of mind marked by complaint and impatience; disturbance of temper; irritation; as, he keeps his mind in a continual fret.

Fret (n.) Herpes; tetter.

Fret (n.) The worn sides of river banks, where ores, or stones containing them, accumulate by being washed down from the hills, and thus indicate to the miners the locality of the veins.

Fret (v. t.) To ornament with raised work; to variegate; to diversify.

Fret (n.) Ornamental work in relief, as carving or embossing. See Fretwork.

Fret (n.) An ornament consisting of smmall fillets or slats intersecting each other or bent at right angles, as in classical designs, or at obilique angles, as often in Oriental art.

Fret (n.) The reticulated headdress or net, made of gold or silver wire, in which ladies in the Middle Ages confined their hair.

Fret (n.) A saltire interlaced with a mascle.

Fret (n.) A short piece of wire, or other material fixed across the finger board of a guitar or a similar instrument, to indicate where the finger is to be placed.

Fret (v. t.) To furnish with frets, as an instrument of music.

Frim (a.) Flourishing; thriving; fresh; in good case; vigorous.

Frit (v. t.) The material of which glass is made, after having been calcined or partly fused in a furnace, but before vitrification. It is a composition of silex and alkali, occasionally with other ingredients.

Frit (v. t.) The material for glaze of pottery.

Frit (v. t.) To prepare by heat (the materials for making glass); to fuse partially.

Frit (v. t.) To fritter; -- with away.

Friz (v. t.) To curl or form into small curls, as hair, with a crisping pin; to crisp.

Friz (v. t.) To form into little burs, prominences, knobs, or tufts, as the nap of cloth.

Friz (v. t.) To soften and make of even thickness by rubbing, as with pumice stone or a blunt instrument.

Friz (n.) That which is frizzed; anything crisped or curled, as a wig; a frizzle.

Froe (n.) A dirty woman; a slattern; a frow.

Froe (n.) An iron cleaver or splitting tool; a frow.

Frog (n.) An amphibious animal of the genus Rana and related genera, of many species. Frogs swim rapidly, and take long leaps on land. Many of the species utter loud notes in the springtime.

Frog (n.) The triangular prominence of the hoof, in the middle of the sole of the foot of the horse, and other animals; the fourchette.

Frog (n.) A supporting plate having raised ribs that form continuations of the rails, to guide the wheels where one track branches from another or crosses it.

Frog (n.) An oblong cloak button, covered with netted thread, and fastening into a loop instead of a button hole.

Frog (n.) The loop of the scabbard of a bayonet or sword.

Frog (v. t.) To ornament or fasten (a coat, etc.) with trogs. See Frog, n., 4.

From (prep.) Out of the neighborhood of; lessening or losing proximity to; leaving behind; by reason of; out of; by aid of; -- used whenever departure, setting out, commencement of action, being, state, occurrence, etc., or procedure, emanation, absence, separation, etc., are to be expressed. It is construed with, and indicates, the point of space or time at which the action, state, etc., are regarded as setting out or beginning; also, less frequently, the source, the cause, the occasion, out

Frow (n.) A woman; especially, a Dutch or German woman.

Frow (n.) A dirty woman; a slattern.

Frow (n.) A cleaving tool with handle at right angles to the blade, for splitting cask staves and shingles from the block; a frower.

Frow (a.) Brittle.

Grab (n.) A vessel used on the Malabar coast, having two or three masts.

Grab (v. t. & i.) To gripe suddenly; to seize; to snatch; to clutch.

Grab (n.) A sudden grasp or seizure.

Grab (n.) An instrument for clutching objects for the purpose of raising them; -- specially applied to devices for withdrawing drills, etc., from artesian and other wells that are drilled, bored, or driven.

Graf (n.) A German title of nobility, equivalent to earl in English, or count in French. See Earl.

Gram (a.) Angry.

Gram (n.) The East Indian name of the chick-pea (Cicer arietinum) and its seeds; also, other similar seeds there used for food.

Gram (n.) Alt. of Gramme

Gray (superl.) White mixed with black, as the color of pepper and salt, or of ashes, or of hair whitened by age; sometimes, a dark mixed color; as, the soft gray eye of a dove.

Gray (superl.) Gray-haired; gray-headed; of a gray color; hoary.

Gray (superl.) Old; mature; as, gray experience. Ames.

Gray (n.) A gray color; any mixture of white and black; also, a neutral or whitish tint.

Gray (n.) An animal or thing of gray color, as a horse, a badger, or a kind of salmon.

Gree (n.) Good will; favor; pleasure; satisfaction; -- used esp. in such phrases as: to take in gree; to accept in gree; that is, to take favorably.

Gree (n.) Rank; degree; position.

Gree (n.) The prize; the honor of the day; as, to bear the gree, i. e., to carry off the prize.

Gree (v. i.) To agree.

Gree (n.) A step.

Gres (n.) Grass.

Gret (a.) Alt. of Grete

Grew () imp. of Grow.

Grey (a.) See Gray (the correct orthography).

Grid (n.) A grating of thin parallel bars, similar to a gridiron.

Grig (n.) A cricket or grasshopper.

Grig (n.) Any small eel.

Grig (n.) The broad-nosed eel. See Glut.

Grig (n.) Heath.

Gril (a.) Harsh; hard; severe; stern; rough.

Grim (Compar.) Of forbidding or fear-inspiring aspect; fierce; stern; surly; cruel; frightful; horrible.

Grin (n.) A snare; a gin.

Grin (v. i.) To show the teeth, as a dog; to snarl.

Grin (v. i.) To set the teeth together and open the lips, or to open the mouth and withdraw the lips from the teeth, so as to show them, as in laughter, scorn, or pain.

Grin (v. t.) To express by grinning.

Grin (n.) The act of closing the teeth and showing them, or of withdrawing the lips and showing the teeth; a hard, forced, or sneering smile.

Grip (n.) The griffin.

Grip (n.) A small ditch or furrow.

Grip (v. t.) To trench; to drain.

Grip (v. t.) An energetic or tenacious grasp; a holding fast; strength in grasping.

Grip (v. t.) A peculiar mode of clasping the hand, by which members of a secret association recognize or greet, one another; as, a masonic grip.

Grip (v. t.) That by which anything is grasped; a handle or gripe; as, the grip of a sword.

Grip (v. t.) A device for grasping or holding fast to something.

Grip (v. t.) To give a grip to; to grasp; to gripe.

Gris (a.) Gray.

Gris (a.) A costly kind of fur.

Gris (n. sing. & pl.) A little pig.

Grit (n.) Sand or gravel; rough, hard particles.

Grit (n.) The coarse part of meal.

Grit (n.) Grain, esp. oats or wheat, hulled and coarsely ground; in high milling, fragments of cracked wheat smaller than groats.

Grit (n.) A hard, coarse-grained siliceous sandstone; as, millstone grit; -- called also gritrock and gritstone. The name is also applied to a finer sharp-grained sandstone; as, grindstone grit.

Grit (n.) Structure, as adapted to grind or sharpen; as, a hone of good grit.

Grit (n.) Firmness of mind; invincible spirit; unyielding courage; fortitude.

Grit (v. i.) To give forth a grating sound, as sand under the feet; to grate; to grind.

Grit (v. t.) To grind; to rub harshly together; to grate; as, to grit the teeth.

Grog (n.) A mixture of spirit and water not sweetened; hence, any intoxicating liquor.

Gros (n.) A heavy silk with a dull finish; as, gros de Naples; gros de Tours.

Grot (n.) A grotto.

Grot (n.) Alt. of Grote

Grew (imp.) of Grow

Grow (v. i.) To increase in size by a natural and organic process; to increase in bulk by the gradual assimilation of new matter into the living organism; -- said of animals and vegetables and their organs.

Grow (v. i.) To increase in any way; to become larger and stronger; to be augmented; to advance; to extend; to wax; to accrue.

Grow (v. i.) To spring up and come to matturity in a natural way; to be produced by vegetation; to thrive; to flourish; as, rice grows in warm countries.

Grow (v. i.) To pass from one state to another; to result as an effect from a cause; to become; as, to grow pale.

Grow (v. i.) To become attached of fixed; to adhere.

Grow (v. t.) To cause to grow; to cultivate; to produce; as, to grow a crop; to grow wheat, hops, or tobacco.

Grub (v. i.) To dig in or under the ground, generally for an object that is difficult to reach or extricate; to be occupied in digging.

Grub (v. i.) To drudge; to do menial work.

Grub (v. t.) To dig; to dig up by the roots; to root out by digging; -- followed by up; as, to grub up trees, rushes, or sedge.

Grub (v. t.) To supply with food.

Grub (n.) The larva of an insect, especially of a beetle; -- called also grubworm. See Illust. of Goldsmith beetle, under Goldsmith.

Grub (n.) A short, thick man; a dwarf.

Grub (n.) Victuals; food.

Gruf (adv.) Forwards; with one's face to the ground.

Grum (a.) Morose; severe of countenance; sour; surly; glum; grim.

Grum (a.) Low; deep in the throat; guttural; rumbling; as,

Iran (n.) The native name of Persia.

Iris (n.) The goddess of the rainbow, and swift-footed messenger of the gods.

Iris (n.) The rainbow.

Iris (n.) An appearance resembling the rainbow; a prismatic play of colors.

Iris (n.) The contractile membrane perforated by the pupil, and forming the colored portion of the eye. See Eye.

Iris (n.) A genus of plants having showy flowers and bulbous or tuberous roots, of which the flower-de-luce (fleur-de-lis), orris, and other species of flag are examples. See Illust. of Flower-de-luce.

Iris (n.) See Fleur-de-lis, 2.

Iron (n.) The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide (as hematite, magnetite, etc.), or a hydrous oxide (as limonite, turgite, etc.). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; viz., cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or on a fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized (rusted) by moisture, and is attacked

Iron (n.) An instrument or utensil made of iron; -- chiefly in composition; as, a flatiron, a smoothing iron, etc.

Iron (n.) Fetters; chains; handcuffs; manacles.

Iron (n.) Strength; power; firmness; inflexibility; as, to rule with a rod of iron.

Iron (n.) Of, or made of iron; consisting of iron; as, an iron bar, dust.

Iron (n.) Resembling iron in color; as, iron blackness.

Iron (n.) Like iron in hardness, strength, impenetrability, power of endurance, insensibility, etc.;

Iron (n.) Rude; hard; harsh; severe.

Iron (n.) Firm; robust; enduring; as, an iron constitution.

Iron (n.) Inflexible; unrelenting; as, an iron will.

Iron (n.) Not to be broken; holding or binding fast; tenacious.

Iron (v. t.) To smooth with an instrument of iron; especially, to smooth, as cloth, with a heated flatiron; -- sometimes used with out.

Iron (v. t.) To shackle with irons; to fetter or handcuff.

Iron (v. t.) To furnish or arm with iron; as, to iron a wagon.

Irpe (n.) A fantastic grimace or contortion of the body.

Kris (n.) A Malay dagger. See Creese.

Mrs. () The customary abbreviation of Mistress when used as a title of courtesy, in writing and printing.

Oral (a.) Uttered by the mouth, or in words; spoken, not written; verbal; as, oral traditions; oral testimony; oral law.

Oral (a.) Of or pertaining to the mouth; surrounding or lining the mouth; as, oral cilia or cirri.

-men (pl. ) of Orangeman

Orby (a.) Orblike; having the course of an orb; revolving.

Orfe (n.) A bright-colored domesticated variety of the id. See Id.

Orgy (n.) A frantic revel; drunken revelry. See Orgies

Orle (n.) A bearing, in the form of a fillet, round the shield, within, but at some distance from, the border.

Orle (n.) The wreath, or chaplet, surmounting or encircling the helmet of a knight and bearing the crest.

Orlo (n.) A wind instrument of music in use among the Spaniards.

Orts (pl. ) of Ort

-ory () An adjective suffix meaning of or pertaining to, serving for; as in auditory, pertaining to or serving for hearing; prohibitory, amendatory, etc.

-ory () A noun suffix denoting that which pertains to, or serves for; as in ambulatory, that which serves for walking; consistory, factory, etc.

Oryx (n.) A genus of African antelopes which includes the gemsbok, the leucoryx, the bisa antelope (O. beisa), and the beatrix antelope (O. beatrix) of Arabia.

Prad (n.) A horse.

Pram (n.) Alt. of Prame

Pray (n. & v.) See Pry.

Pray (v. i.) To make request with earnestness or zeal, as for something desired; to make entreaty or supplication; to offer prayer to a deity or divine being as a religious act; specifically, to address the Supreme Being with adoration, confession, supplication, and thanksgiving.

Pray (v. t.) To address earnest request to; to supplicate; to entreat; to implore; to beseech.

Pray (v. t.) To ask earnestly for; to seek to obtain by supplication; to entreat for.

Pray (v. t.) To effect or accomplish by praying; as, to pray a soul out of purgatory.

Pre- () A prefix denoting priority (of time, place, or rank); as, precede, to go before; precursor, a forerunner; prefix, to fix or place before; preeminent eminent before or above others. Pre- is sometimes used intensively, as in prepotent, very potent.

Prey (n.) Anything, as goods, etc., taken or got by violence; anything taken by force from an enemy in war; spoil; booty; plunder.

Prey (n.) That which is or may be seized by animals or birds to be devoured; hence, a person given up as a victim.

Prey (n.) The act of devouring other creatures; ravage.

Prey (n.) To take booty; to gather spoil; to ravage; to take food by violence.

Prie (n.) The plant privet.

Prie (v. i.) To pry.

Prig (v. i.) To haggle about the price of a commodity; to bargain hard.

Prig (v. t.) To cheapen.

Prig (v. t.) To filch or steal; as, to prig a handkerchief.

Prig (n.) A pert, conceited, pragmatical fellow.

Prig (n.) A thief; a filcher.

Prim (n.) The privet.

Prim (a.) Formal; precise; affectedly neat or nice; as, prim regularity; a prim person.

Prim (v. t.) To deck with great nicety; to arrange with affected preciseness; to prink.

Prim (v. i.) To dress or act smartly.

Pris (n.) See Price, and 1st Prize.

Pro- () A prefix signifying before, in front, forth, for, in behalf of, in place of, according to; as, propose, to place before; proceed, to go before or forward; project, to throw forward; prologue, part spoken before (the main piece); propel, prognathous; provide, to look out for; pronoun, a word instead of a noun; proconsul, a person acting in place of a consul; proportion, arrangement according to parts.

Proa (n.) A sailing canoe of the Ladrone Islands and Malay Archipelago, having its lee side flat and its weather side like that of an ordinary boat. The ends are alike. The canoe is long and narrow, and is kept from overturning by a cigar-shaped log attached to a frame extending several feet to windward. It has been called the flying proa, and is the swiftest sailing craft known.

Prod (n.) A pointed instrument for pricking or puncturing, as a goad, an awl, a skewer, etc.

Prod (n.) A prick or stab which a pointed instrument.

Prod (n.) A light kind of crossbow; -- in the sense, often spelled prodd.

Prod (v. t.) To thrust some pointed instrument into; to prick with something sharp; as, to prod a soldier with a bayonet; to prod oxen; hence, to goad, to incite, to worry; as, to prod a student.

Prog (v. i.) To wander about and beg; to seek food or other supplies by low arts; to seek for advantage by mean shift or tricks.

Prog (v. i.) To steal; to rob; to filch.

Prog (v. i.) To prick; to goad; to progue.

Prog (n.) Victuals got by begging, or vagrancy; victuals of any kind; food; supplies.

Prog (n.) A vagrant beggar; a tramp.

Prog (n.) A goal; progue.

Prop (n.) A shell, used as a die. See Props.

Prop (v. t.) To support, or prevent from falling, by placing something under or against; as, to prop up a fence or an old building; (Fig.) to sustain; to maintain; as, to prop a declining state.

Prop (v.) That which sustains an incumbent weight; that on which anything rests or leans for support; a support; a stay; as, a prop for a building.

Prow (n.) The fore part of a vessel; the bow; the stem; hence, the vessel itself.

Prow (n.) See Proa.

Prow (superl.) Valiant; brave; gallant; courageous.

Prow (a.) Benefit; profit; good; advantage.

Prox (n.) "The ticket or list of candidates at elections, presented to the people for their votes."

Trad () imp. of Tread.

Tram (n.) A four-wheeled truck running on rails, and used in a mine, as for carrying coal or ore.

Tram (n.) The shaft of a cart.

Tram (n.) One of the rails of a tramway.

Tram (n.) A car on a horse railroad.

Tram (n.) A silk thread formed of two or more threads twisted together, used especially for the weft, or cross threads, of the best quality of velvets and silk goods.

Trap (v. t.) To dress with ornaments; to adorn; -- said especially of horses.

Trap (n.) An old term rather loosely used to designate various dark-colored, heavy igneous rocks, including especially the feldspathic-augitic rocks, basalt, dolerite, amygdaloid, etc., but including also some kinds of diorite. Called also trap rock.

Trap (a.) Of or pertaining to trap rock; as, a trap dike.

Trap (n.) A machine or contrivance that shuts suddenly, as with a spring, used for taking game or other animals; as, a trap for foxes.

Trap (n.) Fig.: A snare; an ambush; a stratagem; any device by which one may be caught unawares.

Trap (n.) A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball. It consists of a pivoted arm on one end of which is placed the ball to be thrown into the air by striking the other end. Also, a machine for throwing into the air glass balls, clay pigeons, etc., to be shot at.

Trap (n.) The game of trapball.

Trap (n.) A bend, sag, or partitioned chamber, in a drain, soil pipe, sewer, etc., arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents passage of air or gas, but permits the flow of liquids.

Trap (n.) A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for want of an outlet.

Trap (n.) A wagon, or other vehicle.

Trap (n.) A kind of movable stepladder.

Trap (v. t.) To catch in a trap or traps; as, to trap foxes.

Trap (v. t.) Fig.: To insnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.

Trap (v. t.) To provide with a trap; as, to trap a drain; to trap a sewer pipe. See 4th Trap, 5.

Trap (v. i.) To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game; as, to trap for beaver.

Tray (v. t.) To betray; to deceive.

Tray (n.) A small trough or wooden vessel, sometimes scooped out of a block of wood, for various domestic uses, as in making bread, chopping meat, etc.

Tray (n.) A flat, broad vessel on which dishes, glasses, etc., are carried; a waiter; a salver.

Tray (n.) A shallow box, generally without a top, often used within a chest, trunk, box, etc., as a removable receptacle for small or light articles.

Trod (imp.) of Tread

Trod () of Tread

Tree (n.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single trunk.

Tree (n.) Something constructed in the form of, or considered as resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and branches; as, a genealogical tree.

Tree (n.) A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber; -- used in composition, as in axletree, boottree, chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, a

Tree (n.) A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.

Tree (n.) Wood; timber.

Tree (n.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution. See Lead tree, under Lead.

Tree (v. t.) To drive to a tree; to cause to ascend a tree; as, a dog trees a squirrel.

Tree (v. t.) To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree; as, to tree a boot. See Tree, n., 3.

Tren (n.) A fish spear.

Tret () 3d pers. sing. pres. of Tread, for treadeth.

Tret (n.) An allowance to purchasers, for waste or refuse matter, of four pounds on every 104 pounds of suttle weight, or weight after the tare deducted.

Trew (a.) Alt. of Trewe

Trey (n.) Three, at cards, dice, or dominoes; a card, die, or domino of three spots or pips.

Tri- () A prefix meaning three, thrice, threefold; as in tricolored, tridentate.

Tri- () A prefix (also used adjectively) denoting three proportional or combining part, or the third degree of that to the name of which it is prefixed; as in trisulphide, trioxide, trichloride.

Trig (v. t.) To fill; to stuff; to cram.

Trig (a.) Full; also, trim; neat.

Trig (v. t.) To stop, as a wheel, by placing something under it; to scotch; to skid.

Trig (n.) A stone, block of wood, or anything else, placed under a wheel or barrel to prevent motion; a scotch; a skid.

Trim (v. t.) To make trim; to put in due order for any purpose; to make right, neat, or pleasing; to adjust.

Trim (v. t.) To dress; to decorate; to adorn; to invest; to embellish; as, to trim a hat.

Trim (v. t.) To make ready or right by cutting or shortening; to clip or lop; to curtail; as, to trim the hair; to trim a tree.

Trim (v. t.) To dress, as timber; to make smooth.

Trim (v. t.) To adjust, as a ship, by arranging the cargo, or disposing the weight of persons or goods, so equally on each side of the center and at each end, that she shall sit well on the water and sail well; as, to trim a ship, or a boat.

Trim (v. t.) To arrange in due order for sailing; as, to trim the sails.

Trim (v. t.) To rebuke; to reprove; also, to beat.

Trim (v. i.) To balance; to fluctuate between parties, so as to appear to favor each.

Trim (n.) Dress; gear; ornaments.

Trim (n.) Order; disposition; condition; as, to be in good trim.

Trim (n.) The state of a ship or her cargo, ballast, masts, etc., by which she is well prepared for sailing.

Trim (n.) The lighter woodwork in the interior of a building; especially, that used around openings, generally in the form of a molded architrave, to protect the plastering at those points.

Trim (v. t.) Fitly adjusted; being in good order., or made ready for service or use; firm; compact; snug; neat; fair; as, the ship is trim, or trim built; everything about the man is trim; a person is trim when his body is well shaped and firm; his dress is trim when it fits closely to his body, and appears tight and snug; a man or a soldier is trim when he stands erect.

Trio (n.) Three, considered collectively; three in company or acting together; a set of three; three united.

Trio (n.) A composition for three parts or three instruments.

Trio (n.) The secondary, or episodical, movement of a minuet or scherzo, as in a sonata or symphony, or of a march, or of various dance forms; -- not limited to three parts or instruments.

Trip (n. i.) To move with light, quick steps; to walk or move lightly; to skip; to move the feet nimbly; -- sometimes followed by it. See It, 5.

Trip (n. i.) To make a brief journey or pleasure excursion; as, to trip to Europe.

Trip (n. i.) To take a quick step, as when in danger of losing one's balance; hence, to make a false; to catch the foot; to lose footing; to stumble.

Trip (n. i.) Fig.: To be guilty of a misstep; to commit an offense against morality, propriety, or rule; to err; to mistake; to fail.

Trip (v. t.) To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; -- often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling.

Trip (v. t.) Fig.: To overthrow by depriving of support; to put an obstacle in the way of; to obstruct; to cause to fail.

Trip (v. t.) To detect in a misstep; to catch; to convict.

Trip (v. t.) To raise (an anchor) from the bottom, by its cable or buoy rope, so that it hangs free.

Trip (v. t.) To pull (a yard) into a perpendicular position for lowering it.

Trip (v. t.) To release, let fall, or see free, as a weight or compressed spring, as by removing a latch or detent.

Trip (n.) A quick, light step; a lively movement of the feet; a skip.

Trip (n.) A brief or rapid journey; an excursion or jaunt.

Trip (n.) A false step; a stumble; a misstep; a loss of footing or balance. Fig.: An error; a failure; a mistake.

Trip (n.) A small piece; a morsel; a bit.

Trip (n.) A stroke, or catch, by which a wrestler causes his antagonist to lose footing.

Trip (n.) A single board, or tack, in plying, or beating, to windward.

Trip (n.) A herd or flock, as of sheep, goats, etc.

Trip (n.) A troop of men; a host.

Trip (n.) A flock of widgeons.

-men (pl. ) of Tripeman

Trod () imp. & p. p. of Tread.

Tron (n.) See 3d Trone, 2.

Trot (v. i.) To proceed by a certain gait peculiar to quadrupeds; to ride or drive at a trot. See Trot, n.

Trot (n.) Fig.: To run; to jog; to hurry.

Trot (v. t.) To cause to move, as a horse or other animal, in the pace called a trot; to cause to run without galloping or cantering.

Trot (v. i.) The pace of a horse or other quadruped, more rapid than a walk, but of various degrees of swiftness, in which one fore foot and the hind foot of the opposite side are lifted at the same time.

Trot (v. i.) Fig.: A jogging pace, as of a person hurrying.

Trot (v. i.) One who trots; a child; a woman.

Trow (n.) A boat with an open well amidships. It is used in spearing fish.

Trow (v. i. & t.) To believe; to trust; to think or suppose.

Troy (n.) Troy weight.

Trub (n.) A truffle.

True (n.) Conformable to fact; in accordance with the actual state of things; correct; not false, erroneous, inaccurate, or the like; as, a true relation or narration; a true history; a declaration is true when it states the facts.

True (n.) Right to precision; conformable to a rule or pattern; exact; accurate; as, a true copy; a true likeness of the original.

True (n.) Steady in adhering to friends, to promises, to a prince, or the like; unwavering; faithful; loyal; not false, fickle, or perfidious; as, a true friend; a wife true to her husband; an officer true to his charge.

True (n.) Actual; not counterfeit, adulterated, or pretended; genuine; pure; real; as, true balsam; true love of country; a true Christian.

True (adv.) In accordance with truth; truly.

Trug (n.) A trough, or tray.

Trug (n.) A hod for mortar.

Trug (n.) An old measure of wheat equal to two thirds of a bushel.

Trug (n.) A concubine; a harlot.

Ural (a.) Pertaining to, or designating, the Urals, a mountain range between Europe and Asia.

Urao (n.) See Trona.

Urdu (n.) The language more generally called Hindustanee.

Urea (a.) A very soluble crystal

Urge (v. t.) To press; to push; to drive; to impel; to force onward.

Urge (v. t.) To press the mind or will of; to ply with motives, arguments, persuasion, or importunity.

Urge (v. t.) To provoke; to exasperate.

Urge (v. t.) To press hard upon; to follow closely

Urge (v. t.) To present in an urgent manner; to press upon attention; to insist upon; as, to urge an argument; to urge the necessity of a case.

Urge (v. t.) To treat with forcible means; to take severe or violent measures with; as, to urge an ore with intense heat.

Urge (v. i.) To press onward or forward.

Urge (v. i.) To be pressing in argument; to insist; to persist.

Uric (a.) Of or pertaining to urine; obtained from urine; as, uric acid.

Urim (n.) A part or decoration of the breastplate of the high priest among the ancient Jews, by which Jehovah revealed his will on certain occasions. Its nature has been the subject of conflicting conjectures.

Uro- () A combining form fr. Gr. o'y^ron, urine.

Uro- () A combining form from Gr. o'yra`, the tail, the caudal extremity.

Urox (n.) The aurochs.

Urry (n.) A sort of blue or black clay lying near a vein of coal.

Ursa (n.) Either one of the Bears. See the Phrases below.

Urus (n.) A very large, powerful, and savage extinct bovine animal (Bos urus / primigenius) anciently abundant in Europe. It appears to have still existed in the time of Julius Caesar. It had very large horns, and was hardly capable of domestication. Called also, ur, ure, and tur.

Urva (n.) The crab-eating ichneumon (Herpestes urva), native of India. The fur is black, annulated with white at the tip of each hair, and a white streak extends from the mouth to the shoulder.

Wrap (v. t.) To snatch up; transport; -- chiefly used in the p. p. wrapt.

Wrap (v. t.) To wind or fold together; to arrange in folds.

Wrap (v. t.) To cover by winding or folding; to envelop completely; to involve; to infold; -- often with up.

Wrap (v. t.) To conceal by enveloping or infolding; to hide; hence, to involve, as an effect or consequence; to be followed by.

Wrap (n.) A wrapper; -- often used in the plural for blankets, furs, shawls, etc., used in riding or traveling.

Wraw (a.) Angry; vexed; wrathful.

Wray (v. t.) To reveal; to disclose.

Wren (n.) Any one of numerous species of small singing birds belonging to Troglodytes and numerous allied of the family Troglodytidae.

Wren (n.) Any one of numerous species of small singing birds more or less resembling the true wrens in size and habits.

Wrey (v. t.) See Wray.

Wrie (a. & v.) See Wry.

Wrig (v. i.) To wriggle.

Writ (obs.) 3d pers. sing. pres. of Write, for writeth.

Writ () imp. & p. p. of Write.

Writ (n.) That which is written; writing; scripture; -- applied especially to the Scriptures, or the books of the Old and New testaments; as, sacred writ.

Writ (n.) An instrument in writing, under seal, in an epistolary form, issued from the proper authority, commanding the performance or nonperformance of some act by the person to whom it is directed; as, a writ of entry, of error, of execution, of injunction, of mandamus, of return, of summons, and the like.

Writ (Archaic imp. & p. p.) of Write

Yren (n.) Iron.



Sours: http://www.learnenglishnow.com/4_letter_words_whose_second_letter_is_r.html

Second letter r words with

All words with as second letter

Home  |  All words  |  Beginning with  |  Ending with  |  Containing AB  |  Containing A & B  |  At position


Click to change the position in the word, from the start
1st   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th   11th   12th   13th   14th   15th and middle

Click to change the position in the word, from the end
1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th   11th   12th   13th   14th   15th

Click to change the letter

Click to change word size
All alphabetical   All by size   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15


There are 21355 words with R as second letter

AR ARAARA ARAARAS ARABA ARABAS ARABESK ARABESKS ARABESQUE ARABESQUED ARABESQUES ARABIC ARABICA ARABICAS ARABICISATION ARABICISATIONS ARABICISE ARABICISED ARABICISES ARABICISING ARABICIZATION ARABICIZATIONS ARABICIZE ARABICIZED ARABICIZES ARABICIZING ARABILITIES ARABILITY ARABIN ARABINOSE ARABINOSES ARABINOSIDE ARABINOSIDES ARABINS ARABIS ARABISATION ARABISATIONS ARABISE ARABISED ARABISES ARABISING ARABIZATION ARABIZATIONS ARABIZE ARABIZED ARABIZES ARABIZING ARABLE ARABLES ARACEOUS ARACHIDONIC ARACHIS ARACHISES ARACHNID ARACHNIDAN ARACHNIDANS ARACHNIDS ARACHNOID ARACHNOIDAL ARACHNOIDITIS ARACHNOIDITISES ARACHNOIDS ARACHNOLOGICAL ARACHNOLOGIES ARACHNOLOGIST ARACHNOLOGISTS ARACHNOLOGY ARACHNOPHOBE ARACHNOPHOBES ARACHNOPHOBIA ARACHNOPHOBIAS ARAEOMETER ARAEOMETERS ARAEOMETRIC ARAEOMETRICAL ARAEOMETRIES ARAEOMETRY ARAEOSTYLE ARAEOSTYLES ARAEOSYSTYLE ARAEOSYSTYLES ARAGONITE ARAGONITES ARAGONITIC ARAISE ARAISED ARAISES ARAISING ARAK ARAKS ARALIA ARALIACEOUS ARALIAS ARAME ARAMES ARAMID ARAMIDS ARANEID ARANEIDAN ARANEIDS ARANEOUS ARAPAIMA ARAPAIMAS ARAPONGA ARAPONGAS ARAPUNGA ARAPUNGAS ARAR ARAROBA ARAROBAS ARARS ARAUCARIA ARAUCARIAN ARAUCARIAS ARAYSE ARAYSED ARAYSES ARAYSING ARB ARBA ARBALEST ARBALESTER ARBALESTERS ARBALESTS ARBALIST ARBALISTER ARBALISTERS ARBALISTS ARBAS ARBELEST ARBELESTS ARBITER ARBITERS ARBITRABLE ARBITRAGE ARBITRAGED ARBITRAGER ARBITRAGERS ARBITRAGES ARBITRAGEUR ARBITRAGEURS ARBITRAGING ARBITRAL ARBITRAMENT ARBITRAMENTS ARBITRARILY ARBITRARINESS ARBITRARINESSES ARBITRARY ARBITRATE ARBITRATED ARBITRATES ARBITRATING ARBITRATION ARBITRATIONAL ARBITRATIONS ARBITRATIVE ARBITRATOR ARBITRATORS ARBITRATRICES ARBITRATRIX ARBITRATRIXES ARBITREMENT ARBITREMENTS ARBITRESS ARBITRESSES ARBITRIUM ARBITRIUMS ARBLAST ARBLASTER ARBLASTERS ARBLASTS ARBOR ARBORACEOUS ARBOREAL ARBOREALLY ARBORED ARBOREOUS ARBORES ARBORESCENCE ARBORESCENCES ARBORESCENT ARBORET ARBORETA ARBORETS ARBORETUM ARBORETUMS ARBORICULTURAL ARBORICULTURE ARBORICULTURES ARBORICULTURIST ARBORIO ARBORISATION ARBORISATIONS ARBORISE ARBORISED ARBORISES ARBORISING ARBORIST ARBORISTS ARBORIZATION ARBORIZATIONS ARBORIZE ARBORIZED ARBORIZES ARBORIZING ARBOROUS ARBORS ARBORVITAE ARBORVITAES ARBOUR ARBOURED ARBOURS ARBOVIRAL ARBOVIRUS ARBOVIRUSES ARBS ARBUSCLE ARBUSCLES ARBUSCULAR ARBUTE ARBUTEAN ARBUTES ARBUTUS ARBUTUSES ARC ARCADE ARCADED ARCADES ARCADIA ARCADIAN ARCADIANS ARCADIAS ARCADING ARCADINGS ARCANA ARCANAS ARCANE ARCANELY ARCANENESS ARCANENESSES ARCANIST ARCANISTS ARCANUM ARCANUMS ARCATURE ARCATURES ARCCOS ARCCOSES ARCCOSINE ARCCOSINES ARCED ARCH ARCHAEA ARCHAEAL ARCHAEAN ARCHAEANS ARCHAEBACTERIA ARCHAEBACTERIUM ARCHAEI ARCHAEOBOTANIES ARCHAEOBOTANIST ARCHAEOBOTANY ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARCHAEOLOGIES ARCHAEOLOGIST ARCHAEOLOGISTS ARCHAEOLOGY ARCHAEOMETRIC ARCHAEOMETRIES ARCHAEOMETRIST ARCHAEOMETRISTS ARCHAEOMETRY ARCHAEON ARCHAEOPTERYX ARCHAEOPTERYXES ARCHAEORNIS ARCHAEORNISES ARCHAEOZOOLOGY ARCHAEUS ARCHAEZOOLOGIES ARCHAEZOOLOGY ARCHAIC ARCHAICAL ARCHAICALLY ARCHAICISM ARCHAICISMS ARCHAISE ARCHAISED ARCHAISER ARCHAISERS ARCHAISES ARCHAISING ARCHAISM ARCHAISMS ARCHAIST ARCHAISTIC ARCHAISTS ARCHAIZE ARCHAIZED ARCHAIZER ARCHAIZERS ARCHAIZES ARCHAIZING ARCHANGEL ARCHANGELIC ARCHANGELS ARCHBISHOP ARCHBISHOPRIC ARCHBISHOPRICS ARCHBISHOPS ARCHDEACON ARCHDEACONRIES ARCHDEACONRY ARCHDEACONS ARCHDIOCESAN ARCHDIOCESE ARCHDIOCESES ARCHDUCAL ARCHDUCHESS ARCHDUCHESSES ARCHDUCHIES ARCHDUCHY ARCHDUKE ARCHDUKEDOM ARCHDUKEDOMS ARCHDUKES ARCHEAN ARCHED ARCHEGONIA ARCHEGONIAL ARCHEGONIATE ARCHEGONIATES ARCHEGONIUM ARCHEI ARCHENEMIES ARCHENEMY ARCHENTERA ARCHENTERIC ARCHENTERON ARCHENTERONS ARCHEOASTRONOMY ARCHEOBOTANIES ARCHEOBOTANIST ARCHEOBOTANISTS ARCHEOBOTANY ARCHEOLOGICAL ARCHEOLOGICALLY ARCHEOLOGIES ARCHEOLOGIST ARCHEOLOGISTS ARCHEOLOGY ARCHEOMAGNETISM ARCHEOMETRIES ARCHEOMETRY ARCHEOZOOLOGIES ARCHEOZOOLOGIST ARCHEOZOOLOGY ARCHER ARCHERESS ARCHERESSES ARCHERFISH ARCHERFISHES ARCHERIES ARCHERS ARCHERY ARCHES ARCHESPORE ARCHESPORES ARCHESPORIA ARCHESPORIAL ARCHESPORIUM ARCHEST ARCHETYPAL ARCHETYPALLY ARCHETYPE ARCHETYPES ARCHETYPICAL ARCHETYPICALLY ARCHEUS ARCHFIEND ARCHFIENDS ARCHFOE ARCHFOES ARCHGENETHLIAC ARCHGENETHLIACS ARCHICARP ARCHICARPS ARCHIDIACONAL ARCHIDIACONATE ARCHIDIACONATES ARCHIEPISCOPACY ARCHIEPISCOPAL ARCHIEPISCOPATE ARCHIL ARCHILOWE ARCHILOWES ARCHILS ARCHIMAGE ARCHIMAGES ARCHIMANDRITE ARCHIMANDRITES ARCHINE ARCHINES ARCHING ARCHINGS ARCHIPELAGIAN ARCHIPELAGIC ARCHIPELAGO ARCHIPELAGOES ARCHIPELAGOS ARCHIPHONEME ARCHIPHONEMES ARCHIPLASM ARCHIPLASMIC ARCHIPLASMS ARCHITECT ARCHITECTED ARCHITECTING ARCHITECTONIC ARCHITECTONICS ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTURAL ARCHITECTURALLY ARCHITECTURE ARCHITECTURES ARCHITRAVE ARCHITRAVED ARCHITRAVES ARCHITYPE ARCHITYPES ARCHIVAL ARCHIVE ARCHIVED ARCHIVES ARCHIVING ARCHIVIST ARCHIVISTS ARCHIVOLT ARCHIVOLTS ARCHLET ARCHLETS ARCHLUTE ARCHLUTES ARCHLY ARCHNESS ARCHNESSES ARCHOLOGIES ARCHOLOGY ARCHON ARCHONS ARCHONSHIP ARCHONSHIPS ARCHONTATE ARCHONTATES ARCHONTIC ARCHOPLASM ARCHOPLASMIC ARCHOPLASMS ARCHOSAUR ARCHOSAURIAN ARCHOSAURS

Pages:   1   2   3   4  •••   45

Words in black are found in both the twl06 and the sowpods dictionaries; words in red are only in the sowpods dictionary.

Edit List

See this list for:



Recommended websites

Sours: https://www.bestwordlist.com/p/r/1/wordssecondletterr.htm
Letter R words for kids /Phonics letter r/ Words start with r/r words/r letter words/r for words

In just a month. It was a noble wedding, and when on the first night Vasilek translated Anyuta from a maiden to a woman, she screamed so much. That the whole village quieted down men and women envied such passion.

You will also be interested:

Mashenka's ear. Apparently, she received instructions on what not to say in front of strangers. But Petrovich could no longer get rid of the thoughts about what he had heard. There was complete silence.



2538 2539 2540 2541 2542