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PT 109 (1963)Stream and Watch Online

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Released June 19th, 1963, 'PT 109' stars Cliff Robertson, Ty Hardin, James Gregory, Robert Culp The movie has a runtime of about 2 hr 20 min, and received a user score of 62 (out of 100) on TMDb, which collated reviews from 13 experienced users.

Want to know what the movie's about? Here's the plot: "Dramatization of President John F. Kennedy's war time experiences during which he captained a PT boat, took it to battle and had it sunk by a Japanese destroyer. He and the survivors had to make their way to an island, find food and shelter and signal the Navy for rescue."

'PT 109' is currently available to rent, purchase, or stream via subscription on Google Play Movies, Microsoft Store, Apple iTunes, Amazon Video, Vudu, DIRECTV, and YouTube .

Sours: https://www.moviefone.com/movie/pt-109/1026460/where-to-watch/

PT 109 (film)

1963 film by Leslie H. Martinson

PT 109 is a 1963 American TechnicolorPanavisionbiographicalwar film depicting the actions of John F. Kennedy as an officer of the United States Navy in command of Motor Torpedo Boat PT-109 in the Pacific theater of World War II. The film was adapted by Vincent Flaherty and Howard Sheehan from the book PT 109: John F. Kennedy in World War II by Robert J. Donovan, and the screenplay was written by Richard L. Breen. Cliff Robertson stars as Kennedy, and the film features performances by Ty Hardin, James Gregory, Robert Culp and Grant Williams.

PT 109 was the first commercial theatrical film about a sitting U.S. president released while he was still in office (although FDR was often depicted in small roles during his administration, most notably in Yankee Doodle Dandy). It was released domestically on June 19, 1963, five months before Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas.[1]

Plot[edit]

In August 1942, the American forces are fighting the Japanese in the Pacific. U.S. Navy Lieutenant, junior grade John F. Kennedy uses his family's influence to get himself assigned to the fighting in the Solomon Islands in the Pacific Theater during World War II. He lobbies for command of a PT boat and is given the badly damaged 109. Initially, Commander C. R. Ritchie, the base boat maintenance officer on Tulagi, is unimpressed with the young, untested Kennedy, but the lieutenant is undaunted and restores the 109 to operational status. His crew includes the executive officer, Ensign Leonard J. Thom, and initially skeptical sailors "Bucky" Harris and Edmund Drewitch.

The PT 109 is sent to evacuate paramarines pinned down after the Raid on Choiseul. Kennedy takes aboard the survivors, but barely gets out of range of Japanese mortars before running out of fuel. The tide starts to carry the boat back toward the island. Another PT boat arrives just in time to tow the 109 to safety.

While on patrol one dark, moonless night in August 1943, the 109 encounters a Japanese destroyer that appears suddenly out of the darkness, rams and slices her in two, killing two of the 13 crewmen (Marney and Kirksey). Kennedy leads the survivors to Plum Pudding Island, towing a badly burned crewman. The wreckage is spotted by a reconnaissance plane, and Kennedy and his men are presumed dead. After dark, Kennedy swims out into the channel, staying out all night in the hope of signaling a passing Allied vessel, but without success. The next night, he sends out his friend, Ensign George Ross. After several days, morale drops and several of the men are ready to surrender. However, two natives show up in a canoe. They do not understand English, so Kennedy carves a message on a coconut and gives it to them. They take it to Australiancoastwatcher Lieutenant Reginald Evans. Evans notifies the U.S. Navy, and the men are picked up. According to standard policy, Kennedy and his men are eligible to transfer back to the U.S., but he elects to stay.

Cast[edit]

  • Cliff Robertson as Lt. (j.g.) John F. Kennedy, Skipper of PT Boat 109
  • James Gregory as Commander C. R. Ritchie, base boat maintenance officer of Tulagi Naval Base
  • Ty Hardin as Ensign Leonard J. Thom, XO of PT Boat 109
  • Robert Culp as Ensign George "Barney" Ross
  • Grant Williams as Lt. Alvin Cluster, Commander MTB Squadron 2
  • Michael Pate as Lt. Reginald Evans, RANVR           
  • Lew Gallo as Yeoman Rogers
  • John Ward as John Maguire, Radioman 2nd class
  • Biff Elliot as Edgar E. Mauer, Seaman 1st class
  • David Whorf as Raymond Albert, Seaman 2nd class
  • Sammy Reese as Andrew Kirksey, Torpedoman's Mate 2nd class
  • Robert Blake as Charles "Bucky" Harris, Gunner's Mate 2nd class
  • Buzz Martin as Maurice Kowal, Gunner's Mate 3rd class
  • Norman Fell as Edmund Drewitch. Motor Machinist Mate 2nd class
  • Clyde Howdy as Leon Drawdy, Motor Machinist Mate 2nd class
  • Joseph Gallison as Harold Marney, Motor Machinist Mate 2nd class
  • Errol John as Benjamin Kevu
  • Sam Gilman as Raymond Starkey
  • William Douglas as Gerard Zinser
  • James McCallion as Pat McMahon
  • Glenn Sipes as William Johnson
  • Dean Smith as Lt. Liebenow
  • Andrew Duggan, narrator (uncredited)
  • George Takei, helmsman of the Japanese destroyer (uncredited)

Production[edit]

Kennedy's father, Joseph Kennedy, had been a Hollywood producer and head of the RKO studio at one point, and he used his influence to negotiate the film rights to Donovan's biography of his son.[1] The film was made under the "personal supervision" of Warner's head of production, Jack L. Warner.[1] The White House sent Alvin Cluster, a wartime buddy of President Kennedy,[3] who was also his former commanding officer, as well as a PT boat commander, to act as a liaison between Warner Bros. and the White House.

The White House had full approval over casting and other aspects of the film. Among other actors considered for the lead were Peter Fonda, who objected to having to deliver his screen test using an impersonation of Kennedy's voice;[4]Warren Beatty (Jacqueline Kennedy's choice);[1]Jeffrey Hunter,[5] who had just finished playing Jesus Christ in King of Kings; and Warner Bros Television contract stars Edd Byrnes, Peter Brown, Chad Everett and Roger Smith. Kennedy set three conditions on the film: that it be historically accurate, that profits go to the survivors of the PT 109 and their families and that he would have the final choice of lead actor. He selected and then met with Robertson after viewing the screen tests.[6]

Though Robertson bore little physical resemblance to Kennedy and was nearly 40 years old at the time the film was made, Alvin Cluster told Robertson, "The President picked you not only because you were a fine actor but because you're young looking, yet mature enough so that the world won't get the idea the President was being played by a parking lot attendant or something."[7] In his autobiography Kookie, No More, Edd Byrnes wrote that he was told, "President John F. Kennedy didn't want to be played by 'Kookie'."

Kennedy also vetoed Raoul Walsh as director after screening Walsh's Marines Let's Go and not liking it. Original director Lewis Milestone, who had previously filmed All Quiet on the Western Front, A Walk in the Sun and Pork Chop Hill, left the production, either because Milestone thought that the script was inadequate or because the studio was unhappy with cost overruns.[1] Milestone was replaced by Leslie Martinson, a television director with little experience making films.[8]

The exteriors were filmed at Little Palm Island (formerly Little Munson Island), now a resort in the Florida Keys. Power and fresh water were run out to the island for the film, allowing the resort to be built years later. The construction of the sets and the presence of boats and other paraphernalia gave rise to rumors of another U.S. invasion of Cuba.[1]

At the time the film was being planned, it was found that the few surviving 80-foot Elco PT boats were not in operational condition, and though a further search was conducted, it was determined that none could be located for use in the film, as almost all had been destroyed at the end of World War II. Former World War II-era United States Army Air Forces 85-foot crash boats were converted to resemble Elcos. These crash boats were designed by Dair N. Long in 1944, and their use as movie props was ideal because they possessed performance and profiles similar to the Elcos.[citation needed] American AT-6 Texan training planes stood in for Japanese Zeros.[1]

U.S. Navy support also included a tank landing ship LST 758 USS Duvall County (one of 1,051 built during the war), the destroyer USS Saufley and smaller vessels, such as landing craft and motor whaleboats from nearby Naval Station Key West.

After seeing the film, Kennedy called PT 109 a "good product," but worried about the two hour, 20-minute length. "It's just a question of whether there's too much of it."[9]

Accuracy[edit]

In the film, the PT 109 and all other PT boats are painted in the same standard gray paint scheme used by larger warships of the U.S. Navy. Although many Higgins and Elco PT boats were likely delivered from the manufacturer with such a paint scheme, all historical records indicate that the real PT 109 and the other boats in its squadron were painted in dark green in order to better blend into their daytime anchorages or moorings adjacent to island jungles at forward operating bases. The most common green color scheme of this period was designated as Design 5P and incorporated Navy Green over a base coat of Ocean Green.[10][11]

The film also depicts PT 109 as reported missing, and a search is started. According to National Geographic and the original book, the boat explosion was observed from other PT boats in the vicinity and it was given up as lost. A memorial service was held at the motor torpedo boat squadron's forward operating base at Rendova while the crew was still marooned on the islands in the vicinity of Japanese-held Kolombagara Island.

Solomon IslandersBiuku Gasa and Eroni Kumana are portrayed as random natives, when in fact they were dispatched by the coastwatcher, Reg Evans, to find the sailors. The film shows Ensign Ross first suggesting the idea of using a coconut for a message, using a knife to carve it. Gasa later claimed to have suggested the idea and to have sent Kumana to pluck a fresh coconut. The actors playing Gasa and Kumana were not credited, though the senior native is mentioned by name when the large canoe arrives.

The scene showing the rescue of ambushed Marines is actually covered by the chapter in the book about PT 59, which Kennedy commanded after the PT 109. It was an older model 77-foot Elco PT boat that was converted to a gunboat with its torpedoes removed.

Reception[edit]

PT 109 was released to lukewarm critical response, although Robertson received good reviews.[1] As of September 2020[update], Rotten Tomatoes rates the film at 64% approval.[12] One review comments that "One of the screenplay's pluses ... is its concentration on the minor but still deadly activities that were undertaken by thousands of men during World War II. Not everyone was involved with the major assaults; many spent their time risking their lives in places and situations of which most people are totally unaware, and it's a nice change of pace to see this aspect of the war dramatized."[13]

The film was nominated for the 2006 American Film Institute list AFI's 100 Years...100 Cheers.[14]

Canadian release[edit]

In some Canadian cities, such as Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, PT 109 premiered in theaters on November 22, 1963, the day that Kennedy was assassinated.[15]

Home media[edit]

Warner Home Video released the film on VHS on February 9, 1983 as part of its "A Night At the Movies" series, featuring a Hearst Metrotone Newsreel, a Warner Bros. animated short and a coming-attractions trailer of films from 1963.[16] Warner Archives released the film on DVD in the United States on May 10, 2011.[17]

The film has occasionally aired on Turner Classic Movies and has also periodically aired in letterbox format on the Military Channel in the United States.[citation needed]

According to Oliver Stone during a 2013 Nerdist, PT 109 would be included in his Untold History documentary miniseries box set.[18]

Comic book adaption[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdefghiAxmaster, Sean. "PT 109" on TCM.com
  2. ^"Top Rental Films of 1963", Variety, 8 January 1964 p 37
  3. ^Taylor, Michael (March 14, 2004). "Alvin Cluster -- close friend of JFK". SFGate. Hearst Communications, Inc. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  4. ^Fonda, Peter Don't Tell Dad: A Memoir Hyperion Books (1998)
  5. ^Hoberman, J."Lights, Camera, Exploitation"Village Voice (August 26, 2003)
  6. ^"Career" on the official website of Cliff Robertson
  7. ^p. 146 Smyth, J.E. Hollywood and the American Historical Film Palgrave Macmillan, 17 Jan 2012
  8. ^Hoberman, J. "The Dream Life: Movies, Media, and the Mythology of the Sixties" on "Coffee, coffee and more coffee" (July 23, 2007)
  9. ^Johnson, Ted (August 16, 2013). "Making of John F. Kennedy Biopic PT 109 Was Hardly Smooth Sailing". Variety. Variety media. Retrieved November 4, 2016.
  10. ^Williams, David L. (November 1, 2001). Naval Camouflage 1914-1945: A Complete Visual Reference. US Naval Institute Press. p. 198. ISBN .
  11. ^"The PT Boat Forum & Message Board - Early PT Boat Green- (PT-109) Some ideas".
  12. ^"PT 109" on Rotten Tomatoes
  13. ^"Review" on Allmovie.com
  14. ^"AFI's 100 Years...100 Cheers Nominees"(PDF). Retrieved 2016-08-14.
  15. ^Saskatoon Star-Phoenix, November 22, 1963, movie theater advertisement, pg. 4, archived at news.google.com; accessed July 5, 2014
  16. ^"Warner Home Vid Adds New Titles". Daily Variety. December 28, 1982. p. 2.
  17. ^Amazon.com entry for the film PT-109
  18. ^Levine, Katie (November 20, 2013). "Nerdist Podcast: Oliver Stone". Retrieved May 3, 2015.
  19. ^"Gold Key: PT 109". Grand Comics Database.
  20. ^Gold Key: PT 109 at the Comic Book DB (archived from the original)

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PT_109_(film)
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Future president John Kennedy fights to save his crew when their PT boat sinks in the Pacific.

Film Details

War

Action

Adaptation

Biography

Classic Hollywood

Drama

Jan 1963

Boston opening: 19 Jun 1963

Warner Bros. Pictures

United States

Florida, USA

Based on the book PT 109, John F. Kennedy in World War II by Robert J. Donovan (New York, 1961).

Technical Specs

2h 20m

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color (Technicolor)

2.35 : 1

Synopsis

In the early days of World War II, Lieut. (j.g.) John F. Kennedy arrives in the Solomon Islands to assume command of the battle-scarred PT 109. After making hasty repairs, he and his crew are sent to rescue a Marine patrol trapped on Choiseul. Though the mission is successful, the boat runs out of fuel and has to be towed back to base. Then, on the morning of August 2, 1943, while attempting to prevent the Japanese from landing troops at Vila, PT 109, having no radar equipment, is rammed and split in two by an enemy destroyer. Two of the men are killed, and Kennedy decides the only chance he and the other survivors have is to swim to a nearby island. One of the men is too badly burned to swim, and Kennedy tows him through the water. All efforts to make their location known fail until Kennedy writes a message on a coconut, which friendly natives take to nearby Rendova. They return with a canoe, hide Kennedy under palm fronds, and deliver him to an Australian coastwatcher. After directing the rescue of his men, Kennedy learns he is eligible for transfer home; instead, he elects to assume command of another PT boat.

Photo Collections

Videos

Film Details

War

Action

Adaptation

Biography

Classic Hollywood

Drama

Jan 1963

Boston opening: 19 Jun 1963

Warner Bros. Pictures

United States

Florida, USA

Based on the book PT 109, John F. Kennedy in World War II by Robert J. Donovan (New York, 1961).

Technical Specs

2h 20m

Mono (RCA Sound System)

Color (Technicolor)

2.35 : 1

Articles

PT 109


The exploits of Lt. John F. Kennedy in the South Pacific during World War II are turned into big screen entertainment in PT 109(1963). There had been many films about the lives of American Presidents but this was the first Hollywood drama ever made about a currently-serving President, begun barely a year after his inauguration and released in June 1963; this was two years into his term as the thirty-fifth President of the United States and five months before he was assassinated.

Based on the book PT 109: John F. Kennedy in WWIIby Robert J. Donovan, a war correspondent and political reporter who covered the 1960 campaign, and adapted to the screen by Navy veteran turned screenwriter Richard L. Breen, the film is a profile in courage in miniature. Cliff Robertson plays Jack Kennedy, a young officer who pulled strings to get a command in the South Pacific theater at a time when the Japanese were still dominant. He's offered a run-down wreck by his crusty new commander (James Gregory) and given a week to make it seaworthy. Much of the film hits the familiar notes of the classic platoon film with a stiff reverence (young leader pulls together a makeshift crew into a tight and loyal unit, proves his mettle under fire and makes rousing speeches to rally their flagging spirits). It also delivers a personable portrait of an inspiring leader. He successfully leads his crew through what could have been a suicide rescue mission and risks his own life to save his men from the burning wreckage when the ship is destroyed and then swims through open water to await search and rescue craft without attracting the enemy's attention. While dramatic license is taken with some details (the real PT 109 wasn't a wreck, merely a ship that had seen hard action) and the timeline is rearranged for dramatic effect, the exploits portrayed on screen are more or less accurate to the historical record. Even the coconut, on which the marooned Kennedy carved a message to be carried to the American forces, was true. (The real coconut shell was preserved and is now on display at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts.)

The glowing big screen portrait of the then-current President was in part initiated by his father, Joseph Kennedy, who had been a Hollywood producer and studio chief in the 1920s and 30s and used his connections to negotiate the movie rights to Donovan's book. He surely saw the film as a great political tool, a feature-length advertisement for his son released in advance of the 1964 election. Jack Warner, the head of production at Warner Bros., "personally supervised" the film, which was budgeted at a generous $4 million. Shooting began in 1962 in the Florida Keys, which doubled for the Solomon Islands. Preparations for the production, which included building military shacks and docks and bringing World War II-era sea crafts to Munson Island, led to rumors about another invasion of Cuba. The biggest challenge was securing a small fleet of actual PT Boats. The small boats, used to "harass the enemy and buy time for a navy that was still on the drawing boards" (in the words of the film's opening narration), were built for speed and maneuverability, not durability, and very few of the boats were still around by 1962. Air Sea Rescue Boats were modified to fill out of the screen fleet and American AT-6 training planes substituted for Japanese Zeroes.

While Kennedy's exploits commanding a PT Boat in the South Pacific in 1943 were minor compared to more famous figures, PT 109shows the future commander-in-chief as both a war hero and a strong yet personable leader whose resolve and bravery saves the lives of his men. Cliff Robertson, who had served in the Merchant Marines in World War II, was President Kennedy's choice to portray him in the film, picked out from screen tests sent from Hollywood to the White House (Jackie Kennedy, apparently, wanted to see Warren Beatty in the role). Robertson plays him as a plainspoken, easy-going, all-American guy who works side-by-side with the enlisted crewman, a charismatic leader of modest authority and unflagging commitment, and the role gave his career a major boost. Robert Culp stands out in the supporting cast for his genial turn as Ensign George 'Barney' Ross, a wisecracking buddy who becomes part of Kennedy's crew, Ty Hardin plays Kennedy's second in command and Robert Blake and Norman Fell are among the members of his crew.

Lewis Milestone, veteran director of such war movie classics as All Quiet on the Western Front(1930), A Walk in the Sun(1945) and Pork Chop Hill(1959), was brought in to direct the prestige project but parted ways with the production. While the studio claimed it was due to cost overruns under Milestone's direction, the latter maintained that it was over disagreements with the script, which the director felt was inadequate. Leslie H. Martinson, a TV director with limited feature film experience, was brought in to replace Milestone. He apparently had no problems with the often corny and arch dialogue or the roll call of clichés through much of the first half, elements that would seem to substantiate Milestone's version of events. Not surprisingly, PT 109was released to lukewarm reviews. Robertson, however received good notices for his performance. He carries the meandering film with his understated strength, giving a genial nobility to the heroism of the PT Boat commander that his friends simply called Jack.

Producer: Bryan Foy
Director: Leslie H. Martinson
Screenplay: Richard L. Breen; Vincent Flaherty (adaptation), Howard Sheehan (adaptation); Robert J. Donovan (book "PT 109: John F. Kennedy in WWII")
Cinematography: Robert Surtees
Art Direction: Leo K. Kuter
Music: David Buttolph, Howard Jackson, William Lava
Film Editing: Folmar Blangsted
Cast: Cliff Robertson (Lt. John F. Kennedy), Ty Hardin (Ens. Leonard J. Thom), James Gregory (Cmdr. C.R. Ritchie), Robert Culp (Ens. George 'Barney' Ross), Grant Williams (Lt., Alvin Cluster), Lew Gallo (Yeoman Rogers), Errol John (Benjamin Kevu), Michael Pate (Lt. Reginald Evans), Robert Blake (Charles 'Bucky' Harris), William Douglas (Gerald Zinser), Biff Elliot (Edgar E. Mauer), Norman Fell (Edmund Drewitch), Sam Gilman (Raymond Starkey), Clyde Howdy (Leon Drawdy), Buzz Martin (Maurice Kowal).
C-141m. Letterboxed.

by Sean Axmaker
Pt 109

PT 109

The exploits of Lt. John F. Kennedy in the South Pacific during World War II are turned into big screen entertainment in PT 109 (1963). There had been many films about the lives of American Presidents but this was the first Hollywood drama ever made about a currently-serving President, begun barely a year after his inauguration and released in June 1963; this was two years into his term as the thirty-fifth President of the United States and five months before he was assassinated. Based on the book PT 109: John F. Kennedy in WWII by Robert J. Donovan, a war correspondent and political reporter who covered the 1960 campaign, and adapted to the screen by Navy veteran turned screenwriter Richard L. Breen, the film is a profile in courage in miniature. Cliff Robertson plays Jack Kennedy, a young officer who pulled strings to get a command in the South Pacific theater at a time when the Japanese were still dominant. He's offered a run-down wreck by his crusty new commander (James Gregory) and given a week to make it seaworthy. Much of the film hits the familiar notes of the classic platoon film with a stiff reverence (young leader pulls together a makeshift crew into a tight and loyal unit, proves his mettle under fire and makes rousing speeches to rally their flagging spirits). It also delivers a personable portrait of an inspiring leader. He successfully leads his crew through what could have been a suicide rescue mission and risks his own life to save his men from the burning wreckage when the ship is destroyed and then swims through open water to await search and rescue craft without attracting the enemy's attention. While dramatic license is taken with some details (the real PT 109 wasn't a wreck, merely a ship that had seen hard action) and the timeline is rearranged for dramatic effect, the exploits portrayed on screen are more or less accurate to the historical record. Even the coconut, on which the marooned Kennedy carved a message to be carried to the American forces, was true. (The real coconut shell was preserved and is now on display at the John F. Kennedy Library in Boston, Massachusetts.) The glowing big screen portrait of the then-current President was in part initiated by his father, Joseph Kennedy, who had been a Hollywood producer and studio chief in the 1920s and 30s and used his connections to negotiate the movie rights to Donovan's book. He surely saw the film as a great political tool, a feature-length advertisement for his son released in advance of the 1964 election. Jack Warner, the head of production at Warner Bros., "personally supervised" the film, which was budgeted at a generous $4 million. Shooting began in 1962 in the Florida Keys, which doubled for the Solomon Islands. Preparations for the production, which included building military shacks and docks and bringing World War II-era sea crafts to Munson Island, led to rumors about another invasion of Cuba. The biggest challenge was securing a small fleet of actual PT Boats. The small boats, used to "harass the enemy and buy time for a navy that was still on the drawing boards" (in the words of the film's opening narration), were built for speed and maneuverability, not durability, and very few of the boats were still around by 1962. Air Sea Rescue Boats were modified to fill out of the screen fleet and American AT-6 training planes substituted for Japanese Zeroes. While Kennedy's exploits commanding a PT Boat in the South Pacific in 1943 were minor compared to more famous figures, PT 109 shows the future commander-in-chief as both a war hero and a strong yet personable leader whose resolve and bravery saves the lives of his men. Cliff Robertson, who had served in the Merchant Marines in World War II, was President Kennedy's choice to portray him in the film, picked out from screen tests sent from Hollywood to the White House (Jackie Kennedy, apparently, wanted to see Warren Beatty in the role). Robertson plays him as a plainspoken, easy-going, all-American guy who works side-by-side with the enlisted crewman, a charismatic leader of modest authority and unflagging commitment, and the role gave his career a major boost. Robert Culp stands out in the supporting cast for his genial turn as Ensign George 'Barney' Ross, a wisecracking buddy who becomes part of Kennedy's crew, Ty Hardin plays Kennedy's second in command and Robert Blake and Norman Fell are among the members of his crew. Lewis Milestone, veteran director of such war movie classics as All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), A Walk in the Sun (1945) and Pork Chop Hill (1959), was brought in to direct the prestige project but parted ways with the production. While the studio claimed it was due to cost overruns under Milestone's direction, the latter maintained that it was over disagreements with the script, which the director felt was inadequate. Leslie H. Martinson, a TV director with limited feature film experience, was brought in to replace Milestone. He apparently had no problems with the often corny and arch dialogue or the roll call of clichés through much of the first half, elements that would seem to substantiate Milestone's version of events. Not surprisingly, PT 109 was released to lukewarm reviews. Robertson, however received good notices for his performance. He carries the meandering film with his understated strength, giving a genial nobility to the heroism of the PT Boat commander that his friends simply called Jack. Producer: Bryan Foy Director: Leslie H. Martinson Screenplay: Richard L. Breen; Vincent Flaherty (adaptation), Howard Sheehan (adaptation); Robert J. Donovan (book "PT 109: John F. Kennedy in WWII") Cinematography: Robert Surtees Art Direction: Leo K. Kuter Music: David Buttolph, Howard Jackson, William Lava Film Editing: Folmar Blangsted Cast: Cliff Robertson (Lt. John F. Kennedy), Ty Hardin (Ens. Leonard J. Thom), James Gregory (Cmdr. C.R. Ritchie), Robert Culp (Ens. George 'Barney' Ross), Grant Williams (Lt., Alvin Cluster), Lew Gallo (Yeoman Rogers), Errol John (Benjamin Kevu), Michael Pate (Lt. Reginald Evans), Robert Blake (Charles 'Bucky' Harris), William Douglas (Gerald Zinser), Biff Elliot (Edgar E. Mauer), Norman Fell (Edmund Drewitch), Sam Gilman (Raymond Starkey), Clyde Howdy (Leon Drawdy), Buzz Martin (Maurice Kowal). C-141m. Letterboxed. by Sean Axmaker

Trivia

President Kennedy's personal choice of actor to portray him was Warren Beatty.

Notes

Location scenes filmed in Florida.

Miscellaneous Notes

Released in United States Winter January 27, 1963

Released in United States Winter January 27, 1963

Sours: http://www.tcm.com/tcmdb/title/16111/pt-109/
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Movie full dailymotion 109 pt

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