6 inch wide transition strip

6 inch wide transition strip DEFAULT

Many times, your home is likely to have two different kinds of flooring. Unless you have an open floor plan throughout the place, you’ll probably need a transition strip between different rooms. But installing a transition strip can get a little tricky. We have carefully researched how much space to leave for your floor transition strips.

A transition strip usually has a base that measures around half an inch, which means you need to give it at least one inch of space. Some transition strips might have a base up to three-quarters of an inch wide. Leaving one inch of room for the base of the transition strip will make sure it is snug enough but can still breathe properly.

Using a transition strip is pretty common where two floors meet. It hides and protects the edges of your floors. But a transition strip can also sometimes be a little challenging to install. Keep reading to learn how to properly secure your transition strip, where to place it, and if you really need one.

Package delivery during Covid-19 outbreak. The man is keeping social distancing with transition strips, How Much Space To Leave For A Transition Strip

 

Do you need transition strips between rooms?

Before you begin installing anything, you should feel certain that you actually need transition strips. This means you should clearly understand what they are, as well as the pros and cons for various floor types.

Transition strips are also known as T-molding. That’s because they are literally shaped like a “T.” This is an ideal shape to fill the gap between two different floor types. You won’t have to worry about tripping when you cross between rooms.

And it will help seal the edges down, making sure that any loose edges don’t get pulled upwards. The T-molding will also hide the edges of your floors, which could otherwise look very awkward too.

A transition strip is useful in many different situations, but it isn’t always necessary. Keep in mind that different rooms are likely to have various floor types. Some may or may not need a T-molding.

Kitchens and Bathrooms

Different rooms will often require unique flooring. This is particularly true for the kitchens and bathrooms because they are subjected to unique conditions. Most noticeably, any kitchen or bathroom is more vulnerable to water damage.

That’s why most floor plans aren’t open between kitchens and dining rooms. Instead, special floor tiles are used in kitchens that will resist water and heat. They also won’t show their damage as much as typical hardwood.

Unfortunately, floor tiles can look quite different from wood or carpeting, even though they’re available in so many materials. Yes, it’s possible to find carpet tiles. But this won’t have the correct durability for the kitchen or bathroom. Most floor tiles are some kind of vinyl or natural stone. This can often cause serious conflict next to traditional flooring.

In other words, transition strips are absolutely perfect where the floor tiles of kitchens and bathrooms have to meet the rest of the home. Just remember that any raised piece on the floor might result in a trip or two.

Living and Dining Rooms

Typically, both living and dining rooms will share the same kind of flooring. For example, many homes will use hardwood floors throughout the area. However, it is often advised that you style your home with more than one type of wood.

So even though both rooms can have hardwood floors, the wood tones will usually change from one to the next. Two wooden floors may not necessarily agree if you want your living room to feel brighter or darker than your dining room. That means you might need transition strips to help create a bridge from one wood tone to the next. The T-molding can even cover your hardwood’s expansion gap. That’s the necessary gap between two hardwood floors, which allows them to expand and contract during changing temperatures.

Another popular floor type is carpeting, which is often used for nearly every room in the home. It is soft compared to hardwood or engineered wood flooring. This is generally considered to be more comfortable to walk on. Carpets are also more insulated for warmth and sound, even more than hardwood with an underlay.

But you will certainly need transition strips at the edges of carpeting. Carpets have a bad tendency to tear away at their edges. No matter what pile the fibers are, they are easily weakened by age and filth. In fact, baseboards and trimming are also installed after carpeting in order to help keep the edges from peeling up. 

Also, carpets look completely different from most other floors. A transition strip can help soften the impact your carpet has on the connecting rooms. This will even make it easier to tell when the carpet is approaching a wooden floor, where you might have otherwise tripped.

Open Floor Plans

Photo of a welcome mat in front of a white door of a modern home with transition strips,

However, bear in mind that some homes use an open floor plan. That means that your rooms won’t be separated by anything and will each use the same kind of flooring. If the floor does not change, then no transition strip is needed.

The point of an open floor plan is to create a smooth flow throughout the home. Only the kitchen and bathrooms would be likely to have different flooring here. You can read “How to Create an Entryway in an Open Floor Plan” for tips to really accentuate the space. 

Garages

Your garage is probably connected to the home, which can be problematic. The garage is unique because the primary material for its flooring is cement. That’s because cement is the most durable option, which can survive routine traffic from an actual vehicle.

You might want to consider using a transition strip between the strange cement of the garage and the doorway to your home. Cement is a cold, unappealing floor type that naturally crumbles and creates its own dirt. A transition strip can potentially protect the coarse cement from damaging the flooring beyond your garage doorway.

Where do you put the transition strip in a doorway?

When two floors meet in a large floor plan, you might have some wiggle room for the transition strip. But it won’t look natural in a doorway unless you install the transition strip directly in the center. In other words, the center of the transition strip should always line up with the center of the door itself. Doorways will always make any uneven lines very clear.

How do you secure transition strips?

Typically, the transition strip will come with its own method of installment. For example, a transition strip that has been designed to segue from a carpet will include a metal track. This is meant to imitate a carpet tack strip, which is what carpeting uses to be secured onto the floor. You can read “How Far Should a Carpet Tack Strip Be From The Wall” for more on installing these transitions.

However, you wouldn’t necessarily want to nail into prized hardwood flooring. It may not even work on some natural stone tiles if you need the transition strip for that floor type. In that case, you may need to resort to some kind of commercial adhesive.

Liquid Nails is a reliable brand of construction adhesives. But it’s also sold with a variety of base ingredients, such as latex, polyurethane, or epoxy. You’ll need to choose the one that’s right for you.

Click here to find this Liquid Nails adhesive on Amazon.

Generally speaking, epoxy is the most powerful adhesive for most jobs. Epoxy is a two-part adhesive, where one half is a resin, and the other half triggers a chemical reaction. Epoxy can even be used to glue things to cement.

Just bear in mind that Liquid Nails and other construction adhesives can potentially damage the wood you’re trying to glue together. Consider if you might want to install new flooring in the future. At that time, you’ll likely end up having to replace the transition strip, as well as the flooring it was attached to. However, you can feel certain the transition strips are totally secured throughout their lifespan.

Summary

Package delivery during Covid-19 outbreak. The man is keeping social distancing with transition strips, How Much Space To Leave For A Transition StripTransition strips, also known as T-moldings, are unique but useful features in any home. Most of the time, your floors will not match in every single room. It’s important to learn what transition strips are, how to properly install them, and what relationship they have with certain rooms. Now that you have, you can create better flow throughout your entire home.

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Sours: https://homedecorbliss.com/space-for-transition-strip/

The War Between the Floors

Installing a transition strip

Fun fact: A “war of attrition” is defined as a military strategy in which a belligerent side attempts to win a war by wearing down its enemy to the point of collapse through continuous losses in personnel and materiel.  The war will usually be won by the side with greater such resources.

I am the belligerent side.  The transition strip battle must be won at all costs.

Or, in our usual parlance, I am the monkey and the transition strip is the football.

The goal: cover up the spot where the wall used to be, while making up a 1 1/2-inch difference in height between the two floors.

transition between dining room and kitchen 01-07-2014

In my head, here’s how it was supposed to go.

transition strip template 01-10-2014

  1. A couple of pieces of oak and 3-5 cuts on the table saw would get me a 7-foot-long strip with this profile.  >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
  2. Sand, stain, and poly.
  3. Install.
  4. Congratulate myself on a job well done, and celebrate with a beverage, Dude-style.

You see where this is going, right?  And to answer your question up front: no, I will never learn.

Here’s how it actually went down.

Step 1:  The template told me that I would need a piece of oak 1 1/2 inches thick, 8 1/4 inches wide, and 7 1/2 feet long.  Oak is expensive, and I am a cheapskate, so instead of buying an 8-foot long 2×10, I strategically glued together two 2×8’s — thus saving about 40 bucks.

gluing wood together

Step 2:  Feeling pretty damn proud of myself and still thinking this would be a simple project, I successfully made my first two cuts with the table saw and took that big chunk off the back side.

Step 3:  Time for the first angled cut.  Doubt starts to creep in.  Why?  Because the cut needed to be about 6 inches deep.  And my table saw can only make a cut about 3 inches deep.  So.  I had to get creative.

experimenting with the table saw 01-05-2014

Steps 4-23:  After cutting that angle as far as I could, I turned the piece over and made 17-18 straight cuts, each one slightly shallower than the last, until I got to the top of the piece.

3-5 cuts, my ass.

Step 24:  Chisel.  Chisel all those little fins off.

Step 25:  Use a combination of a hand planer and orbital sander to smooth the surface.  After all, this is going to be stained, not painted…so there’s no putty and paint to hide my shame.

Step 26:  Call it good enough.  Take the piece upstairs to test it out and see how it fits.

test-fitting the transition strip 01-07-2014

Looks good, right?

Wrong.

sagging floor 01-07-2014

The slope in the dining room floor was more extreme than I thought.  At the lowest point, the transition strip was floating almost an inch above the floor.  #FAIL

Step 27:  Bang head against wall.  Contemplate burning the house down.

Step 28:  Check the insurance to see if we have full replacement coverage.  We don’t.  Go to bed without setting fire to anything, and without enjoying the anticipated beverage.

Step 29:  A new day.  Stare blankly at the transition strip for a while, waiting for a solution to present itself.  Surprisingly, it happens!  Chris suggests jacking up the dining room floor.

Step 30:  Look at Chris like he’s crazy.  (Didn’t we already do that 6 or 7 years ago, when we refinished the floors?  Yes, but we only made it “better.”  We didn’t make it totally “level.”)

Step 31:  I can’t believe we had to do this again.  But remember: “at all costs.

jacking up the floor joists

Step 32:  Test fit the transition strip again, and do a little dance because the gap is gone.

Step 33:  Burst my bubble by taking a test-step across the transition strip and realizing that it feels like there’s a huge hump in the middle.  Mostly because there’s a huge hump in the middle.

transition strip profile 01-07-2014

Step 34:  Throw in the towel.  Resolve to go to American Workshop the next day to use the planer, to cut off the top of the strip and remove the offending hump.  Bang head against wall some more and question why I didn’t just go to American Workshop in the first place, where they probably could have told me how to make this damn transition strip in less than 34 steps.  Go to bed, once again without the anticipated beverage.

Step 35:  Day 3.  Call in reinforcements, in the form of American Workshop.  Get the job done in approximately 2.5 minutes.

Step 36:  Return home. Test fit.  Miracle of miracles, it actually FITS!!

Step 37:  Sand and stain.

Step 38:  First coat of poly.

Step 39:  (Day 4)  Sand.  Second coat of poly.

Step 40:  (Day 5)  Install.  AT ALL COSTS.

Installing a transition strip 01-10-2014

Close enough!  And can you believe how level that floor is?

Installing a transition strip 01-10-2014

Can I get some “ooooo”s and “ahhhhhhhh”s?  Or maybe just a “hellz yeah.”

transition strip between kitchen and dining room 01-10-2014

One more thing to cross off the list:

finishing touches 01-10-2014 (02)

  •  and install casing
  •  and install baseboard and toekicks
  • Refinish and install pantry door
  • Organize the pantry
  • Tear up carpet and refinish the stairs
  • Clean and seal the chimney
  • Finish the peninsula

 

 

 

I win.  Someone hand me a beverage.

 

 

 

Disclosure: This post was written in partnership with American Workshop.  They have generously allowed me to use their space for this project, but have not told me what to write.  All projects and opinions are my own.

 

Filed Under: Chapter 1: Beginnings (September 2012 - May 2014), Favorites, Tutorials (such as they are)Tagged With: dining room, DIY, flooring, hardwood floors, kitchen, renovation, woodwork

Sours: https://sarahsbigidea.com/2014/01/the-war-between-the-floors/
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Reducers are one of the finishing touches that complete a job.Reducers are one of the finishing touches that complete a job.

There's more to a good wood flooring installation than just racking the floor correctly and banging it in. A good floor man also pays attention to the details, and part of those details are the transition strips that connect the wood floor to the other floor coverings in the home. One essential transition strip is the reducer, and, fortunately, it's a simple thing to make using tools you already have on hand.

Necessary tools and supplies:

  • 3 1/4 -inch flooring
  • table saw
  • push stick
  • eye protection
  • clamp
  • block plane
  • hand-scraper
  • file
  • sandpaper
  • tape measure
  • pencil
  • chop saw (optional)
  • 5-minute epoxy
  • 1 1/2 -inch nails
  • nail gun

Step 1:

Hf 1205 55 S1

First, select a 3 1/2 -inch-wide piece of flooring to match the existing material. The board should be one foot longer than you will need for the doorway. In this example, I am working with a standard 32-inch doorway, so I need a 44-inch board.

Step 2:

Hf 1205 55 S2

Cut the tongue side off. To do this, set the saw blade to break through 1/4 inch higher than the board. This is a safety precaution—in the event your finger would come into contact with the blade, it would prevent loss of the entire finger. Always use a push stick and eye protection when working with a table saw.

Step 3:

Hf 1205 55 S3

Next, raise the blade to less than the width of the board.

Step 4:

Hf 1205 55 S4

Set the blade to 15 degrees. Move the rip fence in to within 1/4 inch of the blade. Cut the board with the flat side down, which is the side where the tongue was removed. Run the board through slowly to help prevent blade marks.

Step 5:

Hf 1205 55 S5

Plane off the sharp edges on the front of the transition strip.

Step 6:

Hf 1205 55 S6

Use a hand-scraper to eliminate any blade marks. If needed, use the file to get a sharp edge on the scraper.

Step 7:

Hf 1205 55 S7

Use 80-grit sandpaper to hand-sand the board smooth and to create a rounded front edge, as well.

Step 8:

Hf 1205 55 S8

Measure your board to the width of the doorway.

Step 9:

Hf 1205 55 S9

Cut the board to the necessary width using a table saw or chop saw. If using a table saw, be sure to adjust the height of the blade so it's only 1/4 inch above the board.

Step 10:

Hf 1205 55 S10

Here, I've stained and finished the reducer to match the existing floor, and it's ready to be installed.

Step 11:

Hf 1205 55 S11

On the job site, reducers can be installed using 5-minute epoxy and then secured with a nail gun and 1 1/2-inch nails.

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Sours: https://www.woodfloorbusiness.com/installation/article/15124597/step-by-step-how-to-make-your-own-wood-flooring-reducers
How to Install Transition Strips
We are renovating our kitchen and removed a wall between our kitchen and dining. We have plans for a peninsula/ breakfast bar but the placement of the cabinets to allow this is about 4 inches short of the original oak hardwood. We are trying to get some ideas for filling the transition. We have thought about a) just having 4 inch of tile exposed on the dining side of the peninsula (under the counter where the chairs are) b) make the transition with a wood strip. The wood insert contractor suggested to just do tile as either method will result in an obvious attempt to fill the gap - he indicates wood colours would differ. Photo 1& 2 are where the peninsula will be (using wood samples to to reflect where the cabinets will be) photo 3& 4 are reflective of the walk way between the 2 spaces...wood samples with red tape show the corner of the cabinets. Photo 4 shows the wall divide that the tile will line up with - as reflected in photo. Any thoughts or photos of solutions to similar dilemmas? Thank you houzz's!!!!
Sours: https://www.houzz.com/discussions/1205810/4-inch-gap-in-floor-transition-kitchen-to-living-room

Strip wide 6 inch transition

Smooth-Top Thresholds

1

2

3

In addition to making a transition between flooring surfaces, thresholds are often used to reduce the gap between a door and the floor.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

 Wd.Ht.Thick.Fire
Safety
Rating
Mount
Type
Mounting
Fasteners
Included
Lengths,
ft.
 Per
Ft.

Vinyl Rubber

12 3/4"1/2"1/2"Not RatedGlue On__

4, 6

0000000000000

Aluminum

22 1/2"1/4"1/8"UL 10B: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsScrew OnYes

3, 4, 6

0000000000
37/8"1/4"1/16"Not RatedScrew OnYes

3, 6

00000000000
32 1/2"3/8"3/16"Not RatedScrew OnYes

3, 4, 6

000000000000

304 Stainless Steel

24"1/2"1/8"UL 10B: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsScrew OnYes

3, 4, 6

000000000000
25"1/2"1/8"UL 10B: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsScrew OnYes

3, 4, 6

000000000000

Ribbed-Top Thresholds

With a ribbed top, these thresholds offer more slip resistance than smooth-top thresholds. Use them to make a transition between flooring surfaces as well as to reduce the gap between a door and the floor.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

Wd.Ht.Thick.Fire Safety
Rating
Mounting
Fasteners
Included
Lengths,
ft.
 Per
Ft.

Aluminum

4"1/2"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
5"1/4"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
5"1/2"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
6"1/2"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
7"1/2"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000

Adjustable-HeightRibbed-Top Thresholds with Weatherstripping

The threshold height can be adjusted to ensure a tight fit under a door. This threshold has a seal to provide protection from the elements. With a ribbed top, it offers more slip resistance than smooth-top thresholds. Use it to make a transition between flooring surfaces as well as to reduce the gap between a door and the floor.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

Wd.Ht.Thick.Seal MaterialMounting
Fasteners Included
Lg.,
ft.
 Each

Aluminum

3 1/2"7/8"-1 1/4"1/8"Vinyl PlasticYes30000000000000

Ribbed-Top Thresholds with Weatherstripping

1

2

These thresholds have a seal to provide protection from the elements. With a ribbed top, they offer more slip resistance than smooth-top thresholds. Use them to make a transition between flooring surfaces as well as to reduce the gap between a door and the floor.

 Wd.Ht.Thick.Seal
Material
Fire
Safety
Rating
Mounting
Fasteners
Included
Lengths,
ft.
 Per
Ft.

Aluminum

15"1/2"1/8"Vinyl PlasticUL 10B: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
25"1/2"1/8"Vinyl PlasticUL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

000000000000

Antislip-CoatedRibbed-Top Thresholds

An antislip coating adds another layer of slip resistance to these thresholds. With a ribbed top, they offer more slip resistance than smooth-top thresholds. Use them to make a transition between flooring surfaces as well as to reduce the gap between a door and the floor.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

Wd.Ht.Thick.Fire Safety
Rating
Mounting
Fasteners
Included
Lengths,
ft.
 Per
Ft.

Aluminum

5"1/2"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

000000000000
5"1/2"5/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
6"1/2"3/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000
6"1/2"5/16"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsYes

3, 4, 6

00000000000

Reversible Smooth-/Ribbed-Top Thresholds

The middle of these three-piece thresholds can be installed smooth or ribbed side up for more slip resistance. Use them to make a transition between flooring surfaces as well as to reduce the gap between a door and the floor.

3D CAD models availableFor technical drawings and 3-D models, click on a part number.

Wd.Ht.Thick.Fire
Safety
Rating
Mounting
Fasteners
Included
Lengths,
ft.
 Per
Ft.

Aluminum

6 3/4"1/2"1/4"UL 10B, UL 10C: 1 1/2 hr. for wood fire doors, 3 hr. for metal fire doorsNo

3, 4, 6

000000000000

Threshold Ramps

Flush Ramp

Overlap Ramp

Create a gradual incline between uneven floor surfaces. These ramps are good for allowing wheelchair access. All are UL Listed for use in fire-rated doors.

Flushramps mount directly against the abutting surface.

Overlapramps have a lip that fits over your threshold or raised entry.

Wd.Ht.Thick.Lip
Wd.
Cap.,
lbs.
Specifications MetMounting
Fasteners Included
Lg.,
ft.
 Each

Aluminum

Flush Ramps

9"3/4"1/8"__1,000ADA Compliant, UL ListedYes30000000000000000
9"3/4"1/8"__1,000ADA Compliant, UL ListedYes4000000000000000
9"3/4"1/8"__1,000ADA Compliant, UL ListedYes6000000000000000

Overlap Ramps

12"1/2"1/8"3"1,000ADA Compliant, UL ListedYes3000000000000000
12"1/2"1/8"3"1,000ADA Compliant, UL ListedYes4000000000000000
12"1/2"1/8"3"1,000ADA Compliant, UL ListedYes6000000000000000
Sours: /floor-transition-strips/
How To Make A Transition Between Floor Heights From Tile And Wood

Guide to Floor Transition Strips

In a perfect world, your flooring would flow seamlessly from room to room. Hardwood flooring, for example, would flow continuously from living room to bedroom to kitchen to bathroom.

In the real world, however, you cannot help but transition from one flooring type to another because different rooms need different types of flooring. For example, the Brazilian cherry works great in the living room, but you must transition to porcelain in the bathroom due to moisture issues. To accommodate these shifts from one type of flooring to another, the flooring industry uses several different types of accessory items called transition strips.

Transitions Between Similar Floors

If you are transitioning from one type of flooring to the same type (e.g., ceramic to ceramic), it may be possible to have them meet without a transition strip, especially if they are the same thickness. But a transition usually is a better option. For one thing, seams are often incorporated between rooms of like materials to provide for expansion and contraction. A transition strip covers the expansion gap for each material. Also, unless the two floors happen to blend in an aesthetically pleasing way, you'll probably want the visual break provided by a transition.

Transitions Between Different Materials

If you are dealing with two different types of floor coverings, a transition strip is almost always required. Each material needs some kind of finish along its edge, and different materials often create a change in floor height as well as changes in underfoot characteristics (for example, soft, yielding carpet transitioning to cold, rigid tile).

You may think that the less noticeable a transition is the better, but usually that is not the case. Clearly visible transitions are safer because the person walking toward them can see and anticipate the change in flooring elevation or feel, and this helps to prevent accidents.

Fortunately, transition strips are no longer just those aluminum strips. You can purchase a variety of genuine hardwood transitions, even if the floors you are connecting are not wood. For laminate flooring, for example, you can purchase hardwood transition strips that look just like your laminate.

Sours: https://www.thespruce.com/guide-to-basic-floor-transition-strips-1821708

Now discussing:

Then I remember how I vomited, and when I returned, passing by the pool, I saw Natasha sucking at the commander. Also, in my opinion, they fucked her on a billiard table, but I'm not sure, since this could already be a dream. I woke up on the same sofa. Few people stayed in the bathhouse.

I decided to go around all the premises.



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