Samsung 7 series game mode

Samsung 7 series game mode DEFAULT

The best TV for gaming is also generally the best TV for everything else. Nailing the basics of picture quality, such as color, contrast, resolution and brightness, ensures games as well as movies, TV shows and other video look good. But gaming performance can also benefit from additional features, including low input lag and, in the case of next-generation consoles like the Xbox Series X and PlayStation 5, advanced input capabilities. 

We cover the best TVs for PS5 and Xbox Series X, Series S with 4K, 120fps input and VRR in another list, and many of them appear here too. The TVs below focus on low input lag. How fast you react while gaming depends on a feedback loop between your brain, your fingers, the game controller and the action you see on the TV screen. Delay at any point will diminish your performance and the thrilling immediacy of the playing experience. It takes mere milliseconds for a video signal to travel from your console through the HDMI input on your TV to display on the screen, but too many milliseconds can be noticeable to your brain, or downright deadly to your in-game character. Those milliseconds are known as input lag. 

xbox-one-x-comparisons-01

2021 and 2020 TVs' input lag with game mode on and off (milliseconds)

TV Model Year On (1080p) Off (1080p) On (4K HDR) Off (4K HDR)
LG OLED65G1 2021 9.93 81.17 9.97 89.47
Samsung QN65Q90A 2021 10.27 97.37 10.20 70.33
Hisense 65U8G 2021 15.30 126.67 15.37 126.57
Sony XR-65X90J 2021 17.60 159.50 17.30 144.00
Hisense 65R8F 2020 13.37 32.00 13.47 109.43
LG OLED65CX 2020 13.67 88.73 13.73 89.00
Vizio P65Q9-H1 2020 14.77 59.30 14.20 109.63
Hisense 65H9G 2020 15.10 123.37 15.03 136.50
Sony XBR-65X900F 2020 15.50 91.70
Sours: https://www.cnet.com/tech/home-entertainment/best-gaming-tv/

Are you a gamer? If not, you might be confused with some of the settings on your Samsung TV. Samsung and many other LCD TVs offer multiple modes, including game mode. If you are not a gamer and don’t use a console or a computer with your Samsung TV, you can turn this game mode off.

How to Turn Off Game Mode on a Samsung TV

If you don’t know how to do that, you’re in the right place. We’re here to explain the entire process in detail, according to the official Samsung TV support page. After that, we’ll explain the game mode concept and give you some insight.

How to Turn Game Mode On or Off on a Samsung TV

Game mode is a faster setting for your TV. It will allow the TV to render images slightly faster, reducing the input lag. This input lag, or delay, is not even noticeable when watching TV. However, if you are playing intense, competitive games, every frame matters.

There will be a more in-depth discussion about that later, but for now, let’s focus on how to turn game mode on or off on your Samsung TV. First, you should consider the year your Samsung TV was made in because the settings kept changing over the years.

In 2014 Samsung TVs getting to game mode is easy. On the Home screen of your TV, press System option. Then select General. Find Game Mode and turn it on or off, depending on your preference.

In 2015 Samsung TVs it’s nearly the same. On your Home screen, press MENU, then select System, followed by General, and here you will find Game Mode. Turn it on or off.

In 2016 Samsung TVs, the process is very different. On the Home screen of your TV, press the Settings option, then select Picture, followed by Special Viewing Mode. Finally, select Game Mode and turn this option on or off.

Samsung TV

In 2017-2019 Samsung TVs, follow these steps to turn game mode on or off:

  1. Press the Home button on your remote control.
  2. Choose Settings (gear icon).
  3. Scroll down until you find the General options. Choose External Device Manager.
  4. Highlight the Game Mode Settings on the dropdown menu. Press Enter on your RC to turn it off or on.

Important Note

If you want to get the game mode on again, there is something you should know. Before enabling game mode on your Samsung TV, make sure to connect your gaming console or PC to the TV using the appropriate HDMI cable and port.

On your TV, you should select the appropriate Source, e.g., HDMI 1. If you are using a console, consider using the HDMI-STB port. STB is short for set-top-box. If you are using a computer, connect it to the HDMI-DVI port.

You don’t need game mode to watch TV, frankly. It is useless in that regard. You should use it for gaming because it will make the experience much smoother.

How Does Game Mode Work

As previously mentioned, game mode reduces input lag. This input lag is the delay caused by the devices’ image processing. Humans usually can’t even notice this input lag since it’s about milliseconds of delay.

Most of the time, this lag goes is entirely unnoticed if you are not gaming. On the other hand, in fast-paced action games, input lag is very important. It should be kept at a minimum if you want to play competitively.

Gaming monitors have very high refresh rates and low input lag. Console gaming on TVs is not as crisp as PC gaming, but if you have a nice and new Samsung TV, you should have a pleasant experience, even on a console.

On Samsung TVs, game mode means something. However, some TVs that have “game mode” only use this as an excuse to add another color setting, without any impact on input lag or the gameplay. For such TVs, keeping game mode on is nonsensical.

If you are not a gamer yourself, consider turning game mode off on your Samsung TV. The trade-off with this mode is reduced picture quality. If you want a sharp image and you’re only using your TV to watch movies and TV shows, you won’t have any use of the game mode.

How to Turn off Game Mode

To Game Mode or Not to Game Mode

So, if you’re not a gamer, and neither are your kids or relatives, you don’t need game mode enabled on your TV. On the other hand, if you have a gaming console and use it frequently, consider keeping this mode on.

For the best viewing experience, you should keep this mode off. It only makes sense to turn it on to reduce input lag and gain an edge in competitive games.

Are you a gamer or not? Do you use game mode on your Samsung TV? Let us know in the comments section below.

Sours: https://www.alphr.com/samsung-tv-turn-off-game-mode/
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3

Screen Setup

3.4

Game Mode

Configure the product screen settings for game mode.

Use this feature when playing games on a PC or when a game console such as PlayStation™ or Xbox™

is connected.

The functions available on the monitor may vary depending on the model. Refer to the actual product.

3.4.1 Configuring Game Mode

1

When the Function Key Guide appears, select [

Next, press the JOG button.

2

Move to

PICTURE

3

Move to

Game Mode

The following screen will appear.

4

Move to the desired option controlling the JOG button UP/DOWN and press the JOG button.

5

The selected option will be applied.

When the monitor turns off, enters power-saving mode or changes input sources,

turns

If you want to keep

controlling the JOG button UP/DOWN and press the JOG button.

controlling the JOG button UP/DOWN and press the JOG button.

PICTURE

Brightness

Contrast

Sharpness

Game Mode

SAMSUNG

MAGIC Bright

SAMSUNG

MAGIC Upscale

Image Size

Off

even if it is set to On.

Game Mode

] by moving the JOG button UP.

Optimizes image

settings for playing

100

games.

75

60

Off

Off

On

Custom

Always On

Off

enabled all the time, select

Always

Game Mode

On.

40

3 Screen Setup

Sours: https://www.manualslib.com/manual/892020/Samsung-S27d590c.html?page=40
How To Turn On Game Mode - Samsung Q70R Series QLED TV

How to set up your TV for PS5 and Xbox Series X

If you’ve just gotten your hands on a next-gen gaming console like the PlayStation 5 or Xbox Series X, you’re probably itching to set it up and dive right into the latest games. But simply connecting one of these boxes to your TV might not get you the best experience. In fact, depending on your TV’s settings, you might end up wondering why your fancy new toy seems to be slow and sluggish, with picture quality that just doesn’t live up to your expectations.

Related:

The good news is that whether your TV is old or new, there are tweaks and changes you can make to its settings that will make a huge difference to your gaming, regardless of the genre of game. Here are the top tips for setting up your TV for a PS5 or Xbox Series X.

Start with the right HDMI cable

Expensive HDMI cables

You’ve probably read that when it comes to HDMI cables, there’s no need to spend a lot of money and that, for the most part, your existing HDMI cables are just fine. This is still mostly true, but with one important caveat: Speed.

Until we started venturing into the world of HDMI 2.1, with its support of 8K, high-refresh-rate 4K, and high dynamic range (HDR) formats like Dolby Vision, a simple high-speed HDMI cable was just fine for most folks. But these new technologies keep pushing more and more data down that HDMI pipe, and older HDMI cables simply weren’t designed to handle this increased load.

If your new console comes with an HDMI cable, and it’s long enough for your setup, that’s definitely the way to go. But if you need a longer cable, or a second cable because you’re connecting the console to an A/V receiver or soundbar instead of the TV, you should invest in an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable. These cables are tested and confirmed to handle up to 48Gbps bandwidth, which means they can transmit resolutions as high as 8K at 60Hz or 4K at 120Hz, along with lossless multichannel audio and all HDR formats.

But don’t worry: A new Ultra High Speed HDMI cable isn’t going to cost much more than a High Speed HDMI cable. In fact, this 6.5-foot cable from Zeskit is Ultra High Speed Certified and just $20. We expect to see many more of the ultra high speed cables soon as cable companies respond to the demand.

Select the right HDMI port

Depending on what make and model TV you have, you may have one, two, or possibly four ports that support HDMI 2.1 features. Sometimes these ports are clearly labeled as “4K/120,” and sometimes they aren’t labeled at all. It’s best to do a search to determine which HDMI ports on your particular TV support 4K/120.

For example, 2019 and 2020 LG OLED owners can use any of their TV’s four HDMI ports, while 2020 Samsung QLED TV owners get just one HDMI 2.1 connection which happens to be HDMI 4.

Enable HDR

Despite the fact that these next-gen consoles are equipped to display HDR content, they might not be set up to do so out of the box. Here’s how to make sure you’re getting HDR output:

  • For PlayStation 5: Go to Settings > Screen and Video > Video Output > HDR (choose “on” if it’s set to “off”).
  • For Xbox Series X: Press the Xbox button >  Xbox guide > Settings > TV & Display Options > Select Video modes > Select Allow 4K checkbox > Select Allow HDR checkbox.

Auto HDR

Xbox Series X/S have another HDR setting that can be helpful when playing older, non-HDR games. Called Auto HDR, it can give a much-needed boost of color and contrast to older titles as long as they’re compatible with the feature.

To turn it on, go to Settings > General > TV & display options > Video modes > Auto HDR.

After you’ve enabled Auto HDR, you can check to see if a running game supports it by pressing the Xbox button once the game has loaded. If it’s Auto HDR-compatible, you’ll see an Auto HDR badge in the top right corner, under the clock.

Go deep (on color)

Newer TVs automatically detect when a connected device is capable of HDR and prompt you to set the corresponding input to UHD color or “deep color.” This is a necessary step in order to see actual HDR video from a console, Blu-ray player, or streaming media box.

But older TVs may not prompt you, which may result in some pretty underwhelming video. So before making any changes to picture quality settings on your TV or console, ensure that the input you’re using is set to UHD color.

All TVs handle this procedure differently, but on an older Samsung TV, for instance, it’s accomplished via the expert settings menu.

Pro Tip: If your console is attached to an A/V receiver or soundbar, and that device is connected to your TV via HDMI ARC, changing that HDMI input to UHD color affects all other devices which are also connected via the receiver or soundbar. So long as these other devices are HDR-capable, that won’t likely be a problem, but if any of them are not HDR-enabled, it could cause signal problems. If this is the case, consider switching your console or the non-HDR device to a separate HDMI input on your TV so you can assign UHD color just to the devices that support it.

Enhanced HDMI

Got a Sony TV? Make sure the HDMI input you use for your game console has Sony’s enhanced HDR feature turned on. To do this, click the TV’s settings icon, external inputs in the TV category, then select HDMI signal format and set to Enhanced format.

12-bit? Yes, please

Some TVs, like LG’s OLED series, have a PC mode setting that enables support for 12-bit color. If you buy a PlayStation 5, this isn’t going to be very helpful as that console (for the time being) does not support 12-bit formats like Dolby Vision.

But Microsoft’s Xbox Series X has both Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos support for movies and games. By enabling 12-bit color on your TV, you’ll get to see every possible color this console can produce — even if, for now, there isn’t much content that takes advantage of 12-bit color.

Adjust your TV’s picture settings

LG picture mode settings

Switching to game mode will reduce input lag and turn off a bunch of picture processing, but you may find you get better overall picture quality by adjusting a few elements.

Try adjusting the color temperature in your TV’s game picture mode. For the most accurate picture, a warmer color temperature is preferred. This will shift the images away from the blue side of the color spectrum and a little more toward the yellow side. This is most easily visible in bright whites and some feel the warmer color temperature is easier on the eyes. Still, some find cooler color temperatures to be more vivid, so go with your preference. The key is to cycle through available options in your picture settings menu and find what you like best.

Another setting worth adjusting is the backlight (OLED light setting in OLED TVs) up or down to suit your viewing environment. In most cases, the game picture preset will max out this setting, but if you game in a dark room, you may find the TV to be a little too bright. Toning this setting down a small amount can increase comfort but should not dramatically affect contrast.

It is not advisable to adjust the brightness or contrast settings since these are usually calibrated to deliver the best balance of HDR highlights and shadow details.

Stay in sync

AMD FreeSync

The Xbox Series X gives you the option of using AMD’s FreeSync 2 technology if your TV happens to be compatible with this variable refresh rate (VRR) feature. But if you choose to enable it, keep in mind that it automatically disables Dolby Vision.

If you’d prefer not to keep messing with settings in order to get Dolby Vision to come back when you want it, you could simply opt to use HDMI VRR instead. As long as your TV supports HDMI 2.1 (which more and more new TVs do), performance should be about the same, and Dolby Vision can stay active.

However, as good as HDMI VRR is, some games can end up getting bogged down, producing frame rates that are beneath HDMI VRR’s range. Should this happen, it may be worth turning FreeSync 2 back on for its low frame rate compensation feature (LFC) as this can help smooth out the bumps.

Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) diagram

If you’ve never PC gamed before, the VRR concept may be a new one. It’s a way of synchronizing the refresh rate of your TV with the frame rate of your game. In the past, if a game’s frame rate fell below the TV’s native refresh rate, it would cause “screen tearing” (see example images above). VRR solves this problem by letting the TV respond to these changes in frame rate so that images are always smooth, never jagged.

Leave the lag behind

Newer TVs feature something called auto low-latency mode (ALLM), while older TVs simply have a game mode that can be engaged. Either way, if you want to avoid input lag — a delay between when you press a button on your controller and when the corresponding action shows up on-screen — you need to make sure your TV is set for gaming.

ALLM and game mode both accomplish the same thing: They turn off almost all picture processing so that there’s nothing getting in the way of your console’s video signal from showing up on the TV’s screen ASAP.

Adjust your console’s HDR settings

Xbox Series X TV Display Options

Once your TV is in game mode (or you have an ALLM-capable TV), it’s time to tweak your console’s HDR settings. While not mandatory, it’s a recommended step to make sure that your on-screen images aren’t losing critical details that HDR can sometimes obscure (see “What about HGIG?” below).

For the PlayStation 5, go to Settings > Screen and Video > Video Output > Adjust HDR. It will take you through a simple three-step procedure to optimize the HDR output for your TV.

On the Xbox Series X, it’s a similar process, which is handled by the HDR Game Calibration app. To access it, press the Xbox button > Power & system > Settings > General > TV & display options > Calibrate HDR for games.

One thing to keep in mind is that, depending on your TV and its native capabilities, you may not see a huge difference before and after adjusting these settings. It’s also worth noting that these tweaks are not a guarantee of perfect HDR performance. Some games — especially older ones — do not play nicely with the recommended HDR color space specs (called rec BT.2020 should you want to explore that further). In these cases, you may need to go back into your TV’s picture settings and continue to tweak things like color, brightness, and contrast to get the best results.

What about HGIG?

LG OLED TV featuring HGIG

HDR gaming is exciting because just like with HDR and movies, it lets game developers create visuals that are more stunning and vibrant thanks to HDR’s increased luminosity and color. But there’s a downside to HDR gaming: Because each TV handles HDR information a little differently (a process known as tone-mapping), some gamers may find themselves at a disadvantage if their TV over-emphasizes brightness thus reducing critical details like the presence of an on-screen enemy or the approach of a curve in the road during a racing game.

To help fix this issue, several companies (including Sony, Microsoft, LG, Ubisoft, Capcom, Vizio, and many others) all came together to form the HDR Gaming Interest Group (HGIG).

While the name of the group may sound more like a kind of new format for your TV, they actually work to set specific recommendations on how HDR-compatible TVs should communicate their HDR capabilities to a game console. And then how the game console can apply those parameters to whatever game you’d like to play. 

When everything is working as it should, you can have faith that your display will show everything the game makers intended for you to see; There should be a correct, tone-mapped HDR image on your screen. 

While many companies have supported and joined the HGIG, they are still waiting for widespread support. For example, Microsoft’s Xbox Series X is the only console that supports HGIG profiles currently. Furthermore, LG’s C9 and CX OLED models are the only TVs that are HGIG-compatible at the moment.

Editors' Recommendations

Sours: https://www.digitaltrends.com/home-theater/how-to-set-up-your-tv-for-ps5-xbox-series-x/

Series mode 7 samsung game

Samsung reveals optimum settings for gaming on the 7 and 8 Series LED TVs

PRESS RELEASE

The Samsung 7 and 8 Series LED TVs are leaders in both design and specification and gamers can enjoy unprecedented picture quality with Samsung's super-advanced imaging technology. The superior Micro Dimming technology delivers outstanding contrast ratios, with purer whites and deeper blacks for your viewing pleasure. With no halo effect, you'll enjoy the tiniest picture details that are normally never seen, which can make the difference between spotting an enemy in your favourite game. The HyperReal Engine and LED backlight enhances images and optimises performance for crystal-clear Full HD images. The Wide Colour Enhancer Plus technology deploys complex algorithms to make colours more life-like, and reveal tones and hues otherwise invisible.

As well as the Game Mode option in the menu, which optimises the settings for game play and can reduce screen lag, there are some additional tweaks that can be made to provide the ultimate picture for gaming:

Model

D7000

Input

Default

HDMI

Setting

 

 

Picture

Picture Mode

Standard

Standard

Back Light

14/20

10/20

Contrast

100/100

99/100

Brightness

45/100

44/100

Sharpness

50/100

35/100

Colour

50/100

50/100

Tint

0/ G50 R50

0/ G50 R50

Advanced settings

Black tone

Off

Off

Dynamic Contrast

Medium

Off

Shadow detail

-2/±2

2

Gamma

0/±3

2/±3

Colour space

Native

Native

White Balance (R, G, B)

Default (25/50)

Default (25/50)

Flesh tone

0/±15

0/±15

Edge Enhancement

ON

ON

LED Motion Lightning

ON

Off

LED Motion Plus

OFF

OFF

Picture options

Colour Tone

Standard

Standard

Size

Auto Wide

Screen Fit

Digital Noise Filter

Auto

Auto

MPEG Noise Filter

Auto

Auto

HDMI Black Level

Greyed out

Greyed out

Film Mode

Auto2

Off

Motion Plus:

Standard

Custom (Blur 0 / Judder1)

 

Model

D8000

Input

Default

HDMI

Setting

 

 

Picture

Picture Mode

Standard

Standard

Back Light

14/20

9/20

Contrast

100/100

98/100

Brightness

45/100

44/100

Sharpness

50/100

30/100

Colour

50/100

50/100

Tint

0/ G50 R50

0/ G50 R50

Advanced settings

Black tone

Off

Off

Dynamic Contrast

Medium

Off

Shadow detail

-2/±2

2

Gamma

0/±3

1/±3

Colour space

Native

Native

White Balance (R, G, B)

Default (25/50)

Default (25/50)

Flesh tone

0/±15

0/±15

Edge Enhancement

ON

ON

LED Motion Lightning

ON

Off

LED Motion Plus

OFF

OFF

Picture options

Colour Tone

Standard

Standard

Size

Auto Wide

Screen Fit

Digital Noise Filter

Auto

Auto

MPEG Noise Filter

Auto

Auto

HDMI Black Level

Greyed out

Greyed out

Film Mode

Auto2

Off

Motion Plus:

Standard

Custom (Blur 0 / Judder 1)

Series TVs are all about a transformative, immersive experience delivered with style and intelligence. The integrated and innovative Smart Hub, which allows you to interact with your TV, ensures everything from surfing the internet on your TV to flicking through pictures and home movies is effortless and fun. Whether you're gaming, watching a movie or listening to music, you will instantly notice the superior 3D Experience, which is ready to re-invent your world of entertainment. And with a sophisticated design to match, which puts you right in the middle of the action, and supreme connectivity for seamless streaming - you have a very stylish and intelligent TV to enjoy.

Sours: https://hexus.net/ce/items/audio-visual/31541-samsung-reveals-optimum-settings-gaming-7-8-series-led-tvs/
How To Turn On Game Mode on a Samsung Smart TV

The best gaming TVs in the UK for 2021

The best gaming TVs are looking better than ever in 2021. Prices are always falling too, so it's a great time to treat yourself to an upgrade. Newer models from the top brands are coming soon, so prices will drop even lower on the current versions. You'll find all our recommended TVs are a worthy investment for the home for movie and TV show fans too because your thumbs deserve a bit of downtime too.

The best 4K TV for gaming candidates are getting more and more affordable nowadays, and we're quite some time away from recommending the rather madly-priced 8K TVs just yet. There are TVs suited to a range of budgets in this guide with all of them set to do your games collection proud. It just depends on how many future-facing features you need and, of course, how big your new gaming TV is going to be. If you're looking to upgrade solely because of the new-gen consoles though, then our best TV for PS5 and Xbox Series X guide or best 120Hz 4K TV guide is certainly worth a look. If you're sticking with current-gen for a while though (and you might well do seeing as PS5 stock is laughably short) then rest assured these are truly some of the best gaming TVs for PS4 and Xbox One still and will be great on the newer consoles when you upgrade.


If you're not only looking for a great gaming TV, but want to make sure it can make use of entertainment services like Disney Plus, and general movie and TV show viewing then rest assured, the picks on this page have been tested in these areas too.

Finding the very best gaming TVs isn't just about finding the most expensive ones from the best brands. We've considered true bang for buck value and weighed up each TV against the competition to give you a mix of feature-rich high-end panels, the best OLED TV screens, best QLED TV panels, and what their special panels offer, and more affordable options that will still leave you gaping at gorgeous graphics with plenty of cash spare to buy more games, or maybe treat yourself to one of the best wireless gaming headsets for an extra immersive experience.

A timely reminder for the sake of value hunting: now that even the newest model of gaming TVs have been out and in the wild for most of this year, and we find ourselves heading directly for the winter sales period, it'll pay to do some research around the upcoming Black Friday PS5 TV deals to know what to expect. And don't forget the Black Friday PS5 deals, and Black Friday Xbox Series X deals too!

Oh, and if you're on the lookout for something truly massive, you might want to consider one of the best projectors, best projectors for PS5 and Xbox Series X, or best 4K projector instead.

Best gaming TVs for 2021

1. LG OLED C1 series

Excellence in gaming support, image quality, and design

Specifications

Sizes: 48-, 55-, 65- and 77-inch guises (OLED485C1, OLED55C1, OLED65C1, OLED77C1)

Input lag: 12.6ms (1080/60)

Display type: OLED

Refresh rate : 120Hz

HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10, HLG

VRR: Yes

HDMI 2.1: Yes

Reasons to buy

+Superb image quality+Four 4k 120Hz HDMI 2.1 inputs+LG Game Optimizer

Reasons to avoid

-No HDR10+ support for Amazon Prime Video

The C1 is the OLED screen every new-gen gamer will be lusting after this year and already one of the best gaming TVs of 2021 so far.

With four 4K 120Hz-capable HDMI inputs, plus a dedicated Game Optimizer control panel, it takes playtime nearly as seriously as you do. Chuck in premium image quality, which leans more heavily on AI smarts than we’ve seen to date, is spectacular, both with native 4K and up-scaled HD, and you're laughing. Offering deep blacks, vibrant hues, and almost three-dimensional levels of details, this is an OLED to be ogled.

Motion handling has also had a tweak. TruMotion Smooth is still around if you like a slick interpolated look, but there’s also a Cinematic Movement option that does something clever with frame merging, so movies always look filmic. It works well. HDR performance is also extremely good. The C1 supports Dolby Vision, HDR10, HGiG, and HLG. There’s no support for HDR10+ though.

The set is available in a wide range of screen sizes, beginning at 48-inches (although this offers no appreciable cost saving over the step-up 55-incher), and boasts a powerful new processor, in the shape of LG’s 4th Gen Alpha 9 chipset. AI plays a role on the audio front too. AI Sound Pro upscales stereo and 5.1, and there’s a Dolby Atmos decoder on-board. Streaming services and catch-up support are extensive. The set uses the all-new LG webOS v6.0 platform, with a full-screen display.

If you’re looking to take home a premium OLED performer, the LG C1 is the obvious front runner.

Read more: LG OLED C1 review

2. Samsung QN95A

The best gaming TV

Specifications

Sizes: 55-, 65- , 75- and 85inches (QE55QN95A, QE65QN95A, QE75QN95A, QE85QN95A)

Input lag: 10.1ms (1080/60)

Display type: Neo QLED (Mini LED)

Refresh rate : 120Hz

HDR: Dolby Vision, HDR10, HLG

VRR: Yes

HDMI 2.1: Yes

Reasons to buy

+Revolutionary Mini-LED backlight+Game Bar mode+Four HDMI 2.1 ports

Reasons to avoid

-No Dolby Atmos

For those looking to get the best gaming TV that 2021 has to offer, the Samsung QN95A is already an early benchmark and exquisite proposition. Evolving its already-brilliant QLED panel tech the QN95A. This has Mini-LED-powered 4K flagship has deep blacks, terrific quality, vibrant colours and contrasts, and exquisite HDR management.

Image quality is superb, thanks to an advanced AI-powered Neo Quantum 4K processor, while an Intelligent Mode optimises all sources, making it an easy screen to live with, whatever you watch, and whatever you prefer.

The television comes with one of Samsung's One Connect Boxes which connects to the set via a fibre optic cable, while an extra unit to factor into the setup, this does allow for four HDMI 2.1 connections meaning anyone with a multi-gaming-device setup is surely catered for well. Smart connectivity is provided by Tizen, Samsung’s smart TV platform and there’s a wide range of apps available, including Netflix, Prime Video, Apple TV+, Disney+, and Now, plus all the usual catch-up TV services. 

A new feature for the QN95A is the Game Bar. This is a dedicated interface for tweaks and adjustments that makes for excellent customisation and tinkering. Latency is very good: we measured input lag at 10.1ms (1080/60), in standard Game mode. When it comes to HDR, HDR10, HLG, and HDR10+ Adaptive are all supported, but there’s no Dolby Vision compatibility, which is a shame - but still doesn't impact the overall performance of the TV.

Even the TV sound system is nicely improved and very good, thanks to Samsung’s OTS+ sound system. Overall, a stunning high-end TV option, and if you want the absolute best 4K QLED screen Samsung makes, then the Neo QLED QN95A is it.

Read more: Samsung QN95A review

3. LG CX OLED

The best value premium TV for PS5 and Xbox Series X

Specifications

Screen size: 48, 55, 65, or 77 inches

Input lag: 13ms

Display type: OLED

Refresh Rate: 120Hz

HDR: HDR10, Dolby Vision, HLG

VRR: Yes

HDMI 2.1: Yes

Reasons to buy

+Reasonably-priced+Stunning image quality+Super slick response times

Reasons to avoid

-Bass performance is a little light

If you're picking up a PS5 or Xbox Series X soon then the LG CX OLED TVs are the ultimate next-gen option thanks to an exceptional 4K display running at a blisteringly fast 120Hz. It's pretty tasty for PC gaming too thanks to Nvidia G-Sync support.

That 120Hz refresh rate is perfectly-matched for fast-paced 4K gaming like first-person shooters and racing titles as you can make screen-tearing a thing of the past with LG's class-leading TV. And as you'd expect with OLED technology, the black levels are outstanding and LG has really nailed this with a design that sees the CX line completely shut off individual pixels for the darkest scenes. So if you're tired of black scenes merely looking like very dark gray, this is the gaming TV for you.

We're used to seeing most OLED TVs priced out of reach a wide audience, but the LG CX OLEDs are surprisingly affordable considering all the plaudits they've amassed around the world since release. We think the 55-inch model really nails that sweet spot of value and a great size for most homes too. Still an absolute banger and top dog in the race for best 4K TV for gaming this year.

4. Samsung QNQ80T / QEQ80T

One of our favourite 120Hz 4K TV for gaming

Specifications

Sizes: Sizes: 49, 55, 65, 75, and 85-inches (QE49Q80T, QE55Q80T, QE65Q80T, QE75Q80T and QE85Q80T)

Input lag: 19.7ms (1080/60)

Display type: QLED

Refresh rate : 120Hz

HDR: HDR10+, HDR10, HLG

VRR: Yes

HDMI 2.1: Yes

Reasons to buy

+Bright, dynamic performer+Free from image burn+Two Game modes

Reasons to avoid

-Lacks Ultra Wide Angle viewing tech

The Q80T is a great gaming TV and that comes from its ability to offer the triumvirate of excellent image quality, 120Hz capability, and downright, sheer bang for buck value. 

Throw in dynamic HDR, superb colour fidelity (and a full-array backlight upping the ante on both of these), and razor-sharp detail, and this is an exceptional package. What with Samsung superseding these once-top-of-the-pyramid panels with the newest NeoQLED range, it's really worth looking at the Q80T range (and similar models) as their prices will become increasingly attractive.

In addition to 4K 120fps support, there’s VRR and ALLM, plus FreeSync support for PC gamers. We also love its OST (Object Sound TrackIng) audio system, which positions speakers both top and bottom of the set, offering a different edge to the best gaming TV.

The icing on the cake is a two-speed Game Mode. Game Motion Plus keeps some picture processing turned on, for maximum eye candy, while hardcore Game mode just improves input lag, to an astonishing 8.7ms (1080/60). 

5. Hisense A6G

A top-quality low-cost screen

Specifications

Sizes: 43-, 50-, 55-, 65- and 75-inch screen sizes (43A6G, 50A6G, 55A6G, 65A6G and 75A6G)

Input lag: 48.2ms (1080/60)

Display type: Direct LED

Refresh rate : 60Hz

HDR: HDR10, HLG, Dolby Vision

VRR: Yes

HDMI 2.1: Not fully - some HDMI 2.1 functionality

Reasons to buy

+A lot of telly-tech for the money+Dolby Vision HDR+Plenty of streaming apps

Reasons to avoid

-No 4k 120Hz HDMI support-Limited HDR brightest

Sours: https://www.gamesradar.com/uk/best-gaming-tvs/

You will also be interested:

The 5 Best 4k Gaming TVs - Fall 2021 Reviews

The Samsung QN90A QLED is the best gaming TV with an LED panel. Unlike OLEDs, LED TVs like this one don't suffer from the risk of permanent burn-in, so you can use it for PC gaming and not worry about the static elements damaging your screen. It's available in a wide range of sizes, and all of them should perform like the 55 inch model we tested, except for the 43 inch variant, which doesn't have VRR and is limited to a 60Hz panel.

It has one HDMI 2.1 input, allowing you to take full advantage of the Xbox Series X and the PS5's capabilities. However, it's a bit disappointing that it's only one input, so you'll need to use an HDMI 2.1 compatible receiver if you want to hook up multiple devices. It has a very quick response time for smooth motion, and gaming feels responsive thanks to the low input lag. It has both FreeSync support and G-SYNC compatibility to reduce screen tearing.

It has a great Mini LED local dimming feature that helps it produce deep blacks, but sadly local dimming performs worse in Game Mode because it seems to raise the black level more. Its VA panel also has a lower contrast ratio than other VA panel TVs because of Samsung's 'Ultra Viewing Angle' technology that aims to improve the viewing angles at the cost of the contrast. If this doesn't bother you, it's one of the best TVs for gaming.

See our review

Sours: https://www.rtings.com/tv/reviews/best/by-usage/video-gaming


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