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DisplayPort to D-Sub: The Full Range of LCD Monitor Video Input Interfaces

A close look at the video input interfaces used in LCD monitors. With the emergence of a new generation of interfaces, growing numbers of LCD monitors feature multiple and different interfaces. Image quality and ease of use are likely to depend on how well the user knows and uses the unique characteristics of each interface when connecting the appropriate devices.

 

Note: Below is the translation from the Japanese of the "IT Media LCD Display Course II, Part 2," published on December 16, 2008. Copyright 2011 ITmedia Inc. Information about Mini DisplayPort was added to the English translation.

LCD monitors feature a wide range of video input interfaces

Driven by demand for higher-resolution monitor environments and the proliferation of high-definition devices, the types of video input interfaces ("interfaces" hereinafter) found in LCD monitors continue to proliferate. More than likely, significant numbers of users encountering LCD monitors incorporating multiple input systems have wondered what to connect to which terminal. In this article, we'll discuss, one by one, the main interfaces used today. But first, let's give an overview of the types of interfaces available.

FlexScan 3237 connectors
Input terminals of the FlexScan EV3237 monitor

 

The interfaces for LCD monitors designed for use with PCs can be grouped into two categories: analog interfaces, carryovers from the days of CRT monitors, and the digital interfaces developed more recently. An analog interface involves the additional steps of conversion of digital signals within the PC to analog signals for output and the conversion of these analog signals back into digital form by the LCD monitor receiving the signal. This series of actions can degrade image quality. (Image quality also depends on the quality of the route used in converting from analog to digital.) A digital interface offers superior image quality, since it transmits digital signals without conversion or modification.

 

LCD-monitor interfaces also can be grouped by differences in the devices connected. Major categories here are inputs from PCs and inputs from audio-video (AV) devices. PC input generally involves one of the following five interface types: D-Sub for analog connections; DVI-D for digital connections; DVI-I, which is compatible with both analog and digital connections; and HDMI and DisplayPort, representing the new generation of interfaces for digital connections. Other more recent adapters input and output PC RGB signals and LCD monitors using USB as a video input interface.

 

The main AV input interfaces are composite video, S-Video, component video, D1 – 5, and HDMI. All of these other than the new HDMI standard use analog connections. As with PC input, a digital HDMI connection generally provides better image quality for AV input than the various analog connection interfaces.

 

It's worth noting that while HDMI was designed for use with AV input and output, the standard also supports PC input and output. LCD monitors incorporating HDMI ports include some that support PC input officially and others that—whether or not they can display PC input—do not support PC input officially.

Main interface types

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D-Sub and DVI: standard interfaces for PC use

D-Sub and DVI are the current standard interfaces in PC environments.

 

Known officially as D-Sub miniature, D-Sub is not exclusive to display use. It's also used for serial-port, parallel-port, SCSI, and other connectors, with the number of connector pins depending on the purpose of use. However, these connector standards are rarely if ever found in PCs now for general-purpose personal use, most such applications having migrated to USB.

 

When used as a monitor interface, a D-Sub port is also known as a VGA port, an analog connection standard that's been around for some time. The connector is a DE-15 connector with 15 pins in three rows, often referred to as a "mini-D-Sub 15-pin" or "D-Sub 15-pin" connector. (Some connectors omit unused pins.) D-Sub is currently the most widely used monitor interface, compatible with very large numbers of PCs and LCD monitors.

D-Sub
A D-Sub female connector (photo at left) installed on the monitor side and a D-Sub male connector (center photo) on the cable side. A D-Sub cable features a screw on each end of the connector that can be turned by hand to prevent unintended disconnection (photo at right).

 

The Digital Visual Interface (DVI) standard uses one of three types of connectors: DVI-D for digital connection; DVI-A for analog connection; and DVI-I, compatible with both digital and analog connections. The DVI-A connector for analog use is not in general use and can be disregarded when choosing monitor products.

 

Keep in mind that there are two types of mainstream DVI-D digital connections: single link and dual link. For a single-link DVI-D connection, the maximum resolution that can be displayed is 1920 × 1200 pixels (WUXGA). Higher resolutions (such as 2560 × 1600 pixels) require a dual-link DVI-D connection providing double the bandwidth of a single-link DVI-D (7.4 Gb/second or higher). To use a dual-link DVI-D connection, the DVI-D input on the LCD monitor side, the DVI-D output on the PC side, and the DVI-D cable must all be compatible with the dual-link DVI-D standard.

 

DVI-I, the other DVI standard, can be used with both digital and analog connections, depending on the monitor cable used. Since a DVI-I analog signal is compatible with the D-Sub standard, an analog connection can be formed by using a monitor cable with a D-Sub connector on one end and a DVI-I connector on the other. Depending on the cable and the connectors on the PC side and on the LCD-monitor side, it may also be possible to use an adapter for connecting a DVI-I connector with a D-Sub connector.

DVI
A DVI-D female connector installed on the monitor side (photo at left) and a DVI-D single-link (18-pin) male connector installed on the cable (center photo). As with D-Sub cables, a DVI-D cable can be secured into place by turning the screws on either end of the connector (photo at right).
DVI  
Pin layouts identify the DVI connector type. At left is a DVI-D dual-link (24-pin) connector; at right is a DVI-A (17-pin) connector.  
DVI  
At left is a DVI-I single-link (23-pin) connector; at right is a DVI-I dual-link (29-pin) connector.  

 

Monitor cables with DVI-I connectors on both ends were available at one time. These are rare today, since this configuration made it difficult to determine whether the connection was digital or analog and generated frequent connection issues. Having DVI-I connectors on both the PC side and the LCD monitor side can lead to confusion. In such cases, the ideal configuration is a digital connection made with a DVI-D cable.

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Three examples of a new generation of digital interfaces

As the latest digital interfaces, the High-Definition Multimedia Interface (HDMI), DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort have attracted considerable attention. All standards offer the capacity to transfer both audio and video signals digitally using a single cable; all offer easy cable attachment and removal.

 

The shapes of HDMI, DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort connectors resemble that of a USB series-A connector (on the side of the USB host, such as a PC). The connectors lack screws, allowing the cables to be readily inserted and removed. (The disadvantage: This makes it easier to dislodge a cable connection if a hand or foot catches on the cable.)

HDMI, DisplayPort, Mini DisplayProt
At left is an HDMI (type A) female connector; in the middle is a DisplayPort female connector; at right is a Mini DisplayPort female connector. The HDMI connector has 19 pins. The DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort connectors have 20 pins and an asymmetrical (left to right) connector. (The HDMI standard also defines a 29-pin type-B connector compatible with resolutions exceeding 1080p.)

 

The HDMI, DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort standards also are compatible with the High-Bandwidth Digital Content Protection System (HDCP). A technology intended to protect copyright on digital content, HDCP allows authorization of both output and input devices before video is displayed.

 

Another feature is that HDMI, DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort video signals can be converted back and forth with the DVI-D standard, a PC digital interface. Using the appropriate conversion adapter or cable, we can output video from a DVI-D, HDMI, DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort connector and input to any of these options. Currently, however, this implementation appears to be imperfect: In certain cases, input and output devices are not completely compatible (i.e., video does not display).

 

While HDMI, DisplayPort, and Mini DisplayPort each can transmit both audio and video using a single cable, DVI-D can transmit only video and requires separate input/output ports and cables for audio. For this reason, when converting between the DVI-D and HDMI, DisplayPort or Mini DisplayPort standards, only video can be transmitted over a single cable. (Some products can transmit audio from the DVI side via a conversion adapter.)

 

Let's look at a more detailed look at HDMI and DisplayPort technologies.

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HDMI, a new standard in digital interfaces compatible with high-definition video

Now a standard interface for devices (primarily televisions and recorders), HDMI was established in December 2002 by Sony, Toshiba, Thomson Multimedia, Panasonic (formerly Matsushita), Hitachi, and Philips, led by Silicon Image. HDMI video signals are based on the DVI-D standard, a digital RGB interface used in PCs, to which audio transmission and digital rights management (DRM) functions were added. HDMI was intended mainly for use as a digital video and audio interface for home electronics and AV equipment.

HDMI
An HDMI (type-A) female connector (photo at left) and male connector (center photo). The compact HDMI cable is easily connected and disconnected, just like a USB cable (photo at right). HDMI cables come in two types: Standard (category 1), denoting those that have passed 74.25 MHz in transmission-speed tests, and High Speed (category 2), denoting those certified for 340 MHz. A High Speed cable is recommended when using high-definition signals such as 1440p.

 

In discussions about HDMI, the subject of functional differences between versions of the HDMI standard is unavoidable. The table below summarizes the major differences. There are significant differences in functions implemented between HDMI versions through version 1.2a and HDMI versions 1.3 and above.

 

Since HDMI versions are backward compatible, we can still input and output video and audio if the output side is compatible with version 1.3 or above and the input side with version 1.2a or below. However, if the output device uses functions implemented in version 1.3 or higher, these functions will be canceled on input devices that comply with version 1.2a or earlier.

 

Incidentally, while HDMI 1.3 incorporates standards such as the wide color-gamut standard xvYCC and Deep Color, which can handle color data at greater than 24 bits, these specifications are elective. A version number such as 1.3 is merely the number of the applicable technical specifications; manufacturers can choose what functions to include, depending on the specific product. For this reason, even a product advertised as HDMI 1.3a compliant may not feature all of the functions supported by HDMI 1.3a.

Main function of each HDMI 1
Click to enlarge
Main function of each HDMI 2
  1. 1 Consumer Electronics Control (CEC): A signal used for control functions between devices connected by HDMI; used in technologies such as Sharp's Aquos Familink , Toshiba's Regzalink, and Panasonic's Viera Link.
  2. 2 Lip Sync: A function that automatically synchronizes audio and video signals.

Click to enlarge

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DisplayPort, the newest interface and a competitor for HDMI as a successor to DVI

Formally approved in May 2006, the DisplayPort standard is a new standard released in May 2005 by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) of the United States, an industry organization that establishes standards for PC-related interfaces. As a video interface promoted by VESA, a constituency composed mainly of PC and monitor makers, it is designed to succeed the DVI and D-Sub standards as a PC interface. However, there's no reason it can't also be used in AV equipment.

DisplayPort
DisplayPort female (photo at left) and male (center photo) connectors. Although a DisplayPort cable resembles an HDMI cable, it has two hooks at the top of the connector to make it harder to disconnect accidentally (photo at right).

 

With a maximum transmission speed of 10.8 Gbps, compatibility with resolutions of up to 2560 × 2048 pixels or higher, color depth of 48 bits (16 bits per RGB color), and a maximum refresh rate of 120 Hz (120 fps), its basic video interface specs are close to those of HDMI. However, unlike HDMI, which transmits data for RGB video signals and clock signals separately, it sends all video and audio to the destination device through a serial connection, split into micro-packets called transfer units.

 

Since DisplayPort is a serial interface like PCI Express that generates a clock from the data instead of using external clock signals, data transmission speeds and functionality are easily improved. In addition, since DisplayPort employs a configuration wherein the LCD monitor is operated directly, it makes it possible to reduce the numbers of components. Another benefit is its ability to transmit signals over distances of up to 15 meters.

 

In the DisplayPort standard, the output side is defined as the source device and the input side as the sync device. Under this configuration, the source and sync devices communicate with each other, making it possible to automatically adjust transmission to the optimal resolution, color depth, and refresh rate. Audio and video data can be transmitted through a combination of single, double, or quadruple channels called lanes, and two data rates (1.62 Gbps and 2.7 Gbps). The minimum configuration is a single lane at 1.62 Gbps; the maximum is four lanes at 2.7 Gbps each for a total of 10.8 Gbps.

 

The audio formats supported and other attributes are important elements of sync devices. For audio, compatibility with 16-bit linear PCM (32/44.1/48 kHz) is required. Other formats are optional. Still, the standard is compatible with formats up to high-definition audio such as Dolby TrueHD and DTS HD. For color information, compatibility with RGB, YCbCr (4:2:2), and YCbCr (4:4:4) is a requirement.

ColorEdge CG318-4K.jpg
Eizo's 31.1-inch wide-screen LCD monitor ColorEdge CG3184-K, with built-in DisplayPorts

 

Column: Licensing fees: One more difference between HDMI and DisplayPort

One major difference apparent when we compare HDMI and DisplayPort is the presence or absence of licensing fees. Implementing HDMI in a product requires manufacturers to pay a licensing fee of $10,000/year, while HDCP implementation requires a separate licensing fee of $15,000/year. These licensing fees entail significant costs for manufacturers. When product pricing reflects these costs, they can impact ordinary users to a greater or lesser degree. A more familiar example is the HDMI cable, which is also subject to a licensing fee, making it more expensive than other AV cables. (Note that the licensing fee is not the sole cause of higher prices; quality requirements and other factors also drive up prices.)

 

DisplayPort requires no licensing fees other than that for HDCP, making it more attractive and easier for manufacturers to adopt. Progress in mass production will likely lead to price advantages for ordinary users as well. Still, HDMI is clearly the current mainstream digital interface for products like AV equipment and videogame consoles. DisplayPort, even if standardized under the leadership of PC makers, is unlikely to take its place. With growing support for DisplayPort among vendors of graphics chips for use in PC environments and growing numbers of compatible products, including the MacBook, use of DisplayPort is projected to expand.

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D-Terminal and component video, analog video interfaces compatible with high-definition video

Let's discuss video input interfaces, starting with the D-Terminal and component video standards. The video signals themselves are identical for both of these. The video signal is composed of the following three signal types: the Y brightness/synchronization signal; the Pb (Cb) signal for the difference between blue and Y; and the Pr (Cr) signal carrying the difference between red and Y. Altogether, these are referred to as a component video signal. A characteristic of this technology is its ability to input and output high-quality analog video signals by omitting the process of video-signal separation and combination.

Componet video inputs
Component video inputs video signals using three cables

 

A component video port has separate connectors for each of the three video-signal types: A green connector for the Y signal, a blue connector for the Pb (Cb) signal, and a red connector for the Pr (Cr) signal. In most cases, the compatible video formats are 480i, 480p, 720p, and 1080i, with connectors labeled Y, Cb, and Cr compatible with 480i video and connectors labeled Y, Pb, and Pr with higher-quality video formats.

 

While component video ports offer higher quality and greater benefits than most other types of analog video input, they also entail inconveniences, including more troublesome connections (since they use three connectors) and greater space requirements on devices equipped with such ports. Additionally, they are incapable of transmitting control signals. In Japan, the D-Terminal standard, formulated by the Japan Electronics and Information Technology Industries Association (JEITA, known at the time as the Electronic Industry Association of Japan, or EIAJ), which features its own improvements on these points, has entered widespread use.

 

A D-Terminal connector combines the three types of component video signals into a single cable and is easier to connect. It also embeds a control signal to identify scanning lines, scanning method, and aspect ratio. (In passing, it's called a D-Terminal only because its connector is shaped like the letter "D"; the "D" does not mean "digital." Signals flowing through the D-Terminal and the connecting cable are analog.) The table below gives the types of D-Terminals (D1 – 5) and corresponding video formats. While many products feature D5 terminals, which are compatible with 1080p video, this is not specified in the official JEITA standard.

D-Terminal
D-Terminal female (photo at left) and male (center photo) connectors. Each connector end of a D-Terminal cable features a hook to prevent accidental disconnection (photo at right). The connector has 14 pins.
D-Terminal Types and Corresponding Video Formats
Click to enlarge

 

Comparisons of picture quality between component video and D-Terminal standards show that component video, with its three separate connectors, offers higher picture quality, due to structural characteristics of the cable and connector. Many believe this difference becomes even more marked with longer cables.

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S-Video and composite video, standard-definition analog video interfaces

Let's consider S-Video and composite video ports. Video consists of a brightness signal and a color signal, combined to create a composite video signal. A composite video port transmits the composite video signal as is; an S-Video port transmits the composite signal separated into a brightness signal and a color signal. Since less processing is needed to combine and separate the brightness and color signals, an S-Video port provides higher picture quality than a composite video port.

S-Video and composite ports
On an RCA connector with three single pins in a row, the yellow pin is the composite female connector (photo at left). Most composite cables assume the form of a single cable that splits into three connectors, with the yellow connector used for video and the red and white for stereo audio (center photo). An S-Video female connector (photo at right), which has four pins.

 

Additionally, there are two types of S-Video ports: S1, which can identify video with aspect ratios of 4:3 and 16:9; and S2, which can identify "letterbox" video with black bands above and below, to display 16:9 aspect-ratio video on 4:3 aspect-ratio monitors. A display device receiving video with a 16:9 aspect ratio or letterbox video performs the appropriate scaling to display the correct aspect ratio.

 

S-Video and composite ports are capable of handling video up to standard-definition NTSC (480i). They are likely to be phased out gradually in the future, except for applications requiring the connection of older video equipment such as VHS video decks or DV cameras.

 

Analog video interfaces, including D-Terminal and component video, can be summarized as follows, in descending order of general perception of picture quality: component video, D-Terminal, S-Video, and composite video.

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Some products even use USB as a video input/output interface

Let's conclude by returning to the subject of PC environments. Some recent products use USB ports for PC display output. While USB was not originally intended as a display interface, demand has emerged for an easier way (easier than using a D-Sub cable) to set up multi-monitor environments, particularly for laptops and low-priced netbooks.

 

Most such products are adapters, which connect to the PC using USB and feature DVI-D or DVI-I connectors on the output side. These are then connected to LCD monitors. After the user installs a device driver, the PC recognizes the adapter as a monitor adapter. Users can create a multi-monitor environment in Windows by activating the secondary monitor connected to the adapter in Display Properties. In terms of display performance, these adapters are not well suited to uses that require high-speed response; they are associated with slight delays in reflecting mouse or keyboard operations.

 

A small number of LCD monitors on the market use USB as a video input interface, making it possible to output and display a PC screen through a USB connection between the PC and the LCD display. These, too, are ideal for laptops and netbooks, since they allow users to use laptops connected to large-screen LCD monitors at their office desks or at home, then use the laptops for mobile use when out and about simply by unplugging a single USB cable.

Sours: https://www.eizo.com/library/basics/displayport_to_d-sub/

read DELL CHRIS post 1, tell what case your PC has first please. 9020 means near nothing lacking a case.

FORMFACTOR = CASE.

and what is in your PCI-express X16 slots?????

I guess you mean the TV is blank screened or the  TV input page shows that HDMI port is dead,?????????

I use DP to HDMI converter. (some work others do not) for sure too long cables.

FIRST OFF NO TELLING IF ALL PC' S RUN GPU CARDS AND WHAT THOSE ARE.

TO A TV, what TV make and model,

are you booting the PC connected or hot Plugging the poor thing.?????

tell exact DP port you use , be clear there, even photos wow.

The HDMI has many issues. I will list some. LIMITS

  • some HDMI (all ends, PC, GPUcard, adapters  and cables do not at all or are flaky
  • the HDMI port pin 18/19 pair power on that pin is limited to 0.050amps, and things that need that can fail.
  • the HDMI below 1.4 may fail on things below that.
  • the HDMI does not support HDCP. once connected streaming fails.
  • Some TVs may not like your adapters, eDID , information page, ident) and not allow it.
  • not turning on TV first? then PC? connected first.? keep in mind the adapter may be dead until PC is on.
  • or the reverse of that, and then the 3rd way is hotplugging  2 ways, to PC first or to TV first , wow.
  • The adapter you have has chip, inside, and needs power, how it get that varies, by brands.  some get power from HDMI and others DP and other both,so there is no way to know but to experiment.

if you are hotplugging HDMI or DP , you need to say that first.  as that can in fact fail easy.

the best solution is buy GPU cards with DP and HDMI, like my GTX1650 has,  get better smarter HW.

mine has all but old VGA. '

how LONG ARE YOUR CABLE (both HDMI and DP) ???

or GO HDMI grade adapters , is is guts /chips. you are best served with smarter chips, PS176 ,example.

PS176-block-20170501a-simple

 

nobody

Sours: https://www.dell.com/community/Optiplex-Desktops/DELL-Optiplex-9020-Displayport-to-hdmi/td-p/7484549
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(If you can see this message without needing to examine the page source, then something somewhere has gone terribly wrong) BEHOLD, the terrible programming of the one known as GLENWING, first of his name, bane of the spammers, champion of thinking, denizen of the Internet (with a capital I), and a Senior Moderator of the LINUS TECH TIPS forum (his lair lies herein: https://linustechtips.com/main/profile/2466-glenwing/ Venture with caution, and remember monsieur: your hand at the level of your eyes! If you can see this message, it is not yet too late for you to heed this warning! Madness descends on all those who attempt to read his writings and decipher his code. Seek not logic, nor efficiency, nor sensible style, nor comments or documentation of any kind (mostly because the forum strips all comments when posting), lest you end up ALT-F4-ing in a fit of rage and losing the contents of your other tabs, causing an infinite loop of frustration: (while (Frustration > 0) { Frustration++; }); The lines ahead contain only darkness and confusion. It is not for the timid, nor for anyone hoping to easily understand what's even going on in this thing. Continue reading at your own peril! --- YE BE WARN'D --- (verbal warning only, no points assigned)

Options for Connecting to a Display's DisplayPort Input Port [Link]

The only port that can be easily adapted to DisplayPort is a USB Type-Cport with DisplayPort Alternate Mode support (this includes Thunderbolt 3 ports), which can be done using a: Other than that, it is generally very difficult to connect to a monitor's DisplayPort input if you don't have a native DisplayPort output available from your computer/source device. There is no way to do this without an active adapter, and these adapters tend to be finicky and unreliable. If you don't have a native DisplayPort output on your device, consider trying to connect to a different type of port on the display. Active adapters to a DisplayPort input should only be considered as a last resort, if the display has no other available ports to connect to.

If you absolutely need to connect to a monitor's DisplayPort input from a non-DP output, then the following options are available: Neither of these options are really preferable over the other (both are finicky and unreliable), but HDMI to DisplayPort active adapters are slightly more common.

DisplayPort-to-DVI or DisplayPort-to-HDMI passive adapters will NOTwork for this configuration. These adapters only work from DisplayPort outputto DVI/HDMI input, not in the reverse configuration.
Options for Connecting to a Display's HDMI Input Port [Link]

If you need to connect to a display's HDMI input, then the following options are available (in order of preference): DVI to HDMI passive adapters and DisplayPort to HDMI passive adapters are both equally preferable. Both are inexpensive, support inline audio (yes, DVI to HDMI passive adapters will support inline audio), and provide image quality identical to native HDMI without any added latency. If you do not have a DVI or DisplayPort output available, you can use a VGA to HDMI active adapter, but the image quality will only be equivalent to VGA, and inline audio will not be supported (though some adapters support audio over a separate cable).
Options for Connecting to a Display's DVI Input Port [Link]

Single-Link DVIprovides enough bandwidth for 1920×1200 at 60 Hz or 2560×1600 at 30 Hz. Video formats which require more bandwidth than those (such as 1920×1080 at 144 Hz or 2560×1600 at 60 Hz) will require Dual-Link DVI.

If you need to connect to a display's DVI input, and the bandwidth of Single-Link DVIis enough for your display, then the following options are available (in order of preference): If the extra bandwidth of Dual-Link DVIis required, then only one option is available: HDMI to DVI passive adapters and DisplayPort to DVI passive adapters are both equally preferable. Both are inexpensive and provide image quality identical to native DVI without any added latency. These adapters only provide a Single-Link DVIconnection, and will not work for video formats requiring more bandwidth than 1920×1200 at 60 Hz or equivalent. Inline audio is generally not supported through these adapters, but it depends on the display.

VGA to DVI adapters (passive or active) will only provide image quality equivalent to native VGA.

For DisplayPort to Dual-LinkDVI conversion, keep in mind that even most DisplayPort to DVI active adapters are still Single-Link only. These are common because older graphics cards required active adapters for multi-monitor configurations beyond two screens. So not just any DP-to-DVI active adapter will work, it mustbe clearly identified as a Dual-LinkDVI adapter, with support for up to 1920×1080 at 120/144 Hz or 2560×1440/2560×1600 at 60 Hz.
Options for Connecting to a Display's VGA Input Port [Link]

If you need to connect to a display's VGA input, then the following options are available (in order of preference):


DVI-Iis a type of DVI + VGA combo port. A passive DVI-Ito VGA adapter provides access to the VGA section of the port, and therefore is equivalent to a native VGA connection. Graphics cards and motherboards which do not have native VGA capability will not have DVI-Iports, and so these adapters will not work with those devices.

If your graphics card/motherboard does not have a DVI-Iport, then the next best option is a DisplayPort to VGA active adapter. These are inexpensive, reliable, and compact, and they are often mistaken as passive adapters. Passive DisplayPort to VGA adapters do not exist, but active DP to VGA adapters are very good.

HDMI to VGA active adapters are usually larger, less reliable, and may require a power cable or USB for power. They are usually slightly more expensive than DisplayPort to VGA active adapters.

DVI-Dto VGA active adapters are no better or worse than HDMI to VGA active adapters, but they are much more difficult to find since historically most graphics cards have been equipped with DVI-Iports and shipped with a DVI-Ito VGA passive adapter included, which has resulted in very low demand for DVI-Dto VGA conversion devices.
Options for Connecting to a Display's USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode Input Port [Link]

USB Type-CDisplayPort Alternate Mode input ports found on displays will only accept video from:
  • USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode output ports
  • USB Type-C Thunderbolt 3 Alternate Mode output ports
In both cases a standard USB 3.1 Type-Ccable can be used. No special adapter cables or active Thunderbolt cables are required, however it should be noted that not all USB Type-Ccables are rated for USB 3.1 speeds.

Normal DisplayPort / HDMI / etc. output ports cannot be connected to a monitor's USB Type-Cinput with a cheap passive adapter or cable, and there are currently (July 2017) no active adapters available which can do this.

Not all USB Type-C ports have video capability. The ports on both the source and display mustsupport USB DisplayPort Alternate Mode to be used for video. This is an optional feature and is not supported by all USB-Cports; laptops or motherboards with USB-Cports may or may not support video output through those ports, and displays with USB-Cports may or may not accept video input through those ports. Check your product's specifications carefully.

Thunderbolt 3 ports also include DisplayPort 1.2 Alt Mode capability, so Thunderbolt 3 output ports on laptop or motherboards canbe connected to displays that have non-Thunderbolt USB Type-Cinputs.

Options for Connecting to a Display's Thunderbolt 3 Input Port [Link]

Thunderbolt 3 input ports will only accept video from Thunderbolt sources. Non-Thunderbolt USB Type-Cports using DisplayPort Alternate Mode are not compatible. No other connection types can be adapted to Thunderbolt 3.

UPDATE JAN. 2018: Intel has released a new generation of Thunderbolt 3 controllers (the "Titan Ridge" family). Displays using these TB3 Gen 2 controllers canaccept video input from a non-Thunderbolt USB Type-C port with DisplayPort Alt Mode. This is the same as a USB-C to USB-Cconnection.

For Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 3 connections:
  • Thunderbolt 3 sources connected with a passive USB 3.1 Type-C cable (20 Gbit/s) will be limited to 4-lane mode (4K 60 Hz)
  • Thunderbolt 3 sources connected with an active Thunderbolt 3 cable (40 Gbit/s) will be able to use the full 8-lane mode (5K 60 Hz)
  • Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 sources can be connected via an adapter, and will be limited to 4-lane mode
In addition, displays may have further limitations of their own. There is currently only one Thunderbolt 3 monitor in existence (the LG 27MD5KA), and it only accepts input from Thunderbolt 3 and Thunderbolt 2 sources. Original Thunderbolt sources are not compatible.


 


DisplayPort Capabilities
Inline Audio Yes
HDR Yes (DP 1.4+)
No (DP 1.3 & Below)
Multiple Video Streams
From a Single Port
Splitters/Hubs: Yes
Daisy-Chaining: Yes
Power Delivery
(for charging)
None

Cabling

All DisplayPort cables have the same internal layout and wiring. All cables are compatible with all devices regardless of what version of DisplayPort the devices are. DisplayPort cables do not affect feature support.All features of DisplayPort will work through any cable. There are no "special" DisplayPort cables required for inline audio, FreeSync, HDR, or anything else.

To run at high resolutions and refresh rates, the cable must be able to handle the required bandwidth. Not all DisplayPort cables can handle the same amount of bandwidth. VESA (the creators of DisplayPort) offer two certifications for cables that can handle certain levels of bandwidth:
  • Standard DisplayPort cables are certified to handle up to at least 21.6 Gbit/s (the full bandwidth of DisplayPort 1.2)
  • DP8K cables are certified to handle up to at least 32.4 Gbit/s (the full bandwidth of DisplayPort 1.3/1.4)
While some people may suggest to you that any DP cable can handle full DP 1.2 bandwidth because there are no certifications below that, please note that not all DisplayPort cables are certified at all, so there areDisplayPort cables on the market that will fail to work for high-bandwidth formats like 4K 60 Hz or 1440p 144 Hz.

Although many cables advertise themselves as "DP 1.1" or "DP 1.2" or "DP 1.4" cables, be aware that these terms have no official meaning. If they are not a VESA-certified Standard DisplayPort cable or DP8K cable, then it is not certified and there are no guaranteesabout how much bandwidth it can handle. It is advised to purchase cables which are certified by VESA. The official list of certified cables may be found here.

Since many people seem to be having trouble finding quality DisplayPort cables, here are some recommendations:

Accell DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable (VESA-certified):
B142C-007B-2 (2.0 meters / 6.6 feet)
B142C-010B-2 (3.0 meters / 9.8 feet)

Accell DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort cable (VESA-certified):
B143B-007B (2.0 meters / 6.6 feet)

GearIT DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable (not VESA-certified, but reviews seem to indicate they handle full DP 1.2 bandwidth out to 15 feet (4.6 meters); 25-foot version does not):
AZ-AV-DP-DP-6FT (1.8 meters / 6.0 feet)
AZ-AV-DP-DP-10FT (3.0 meters / 10.0 feet)
AZ-AV-DP-DP-15FT (4.6 meters / 15.0 feet)

Compatibility

All DisplayPort devices are compatible with all other DisplayPort devices, regardless of the version of each device. When connecting two DisplayPort devices that have different versions, the capabilities and features available are determined by the lower of the two versions. For example if a GPU with DisplayPort 1.4 support is plugged into a monitor with a DisplayPort 1.2 port, the connection will be limited to only the bandwidth and features provided by DisplayPort 1.2. DisplayPort cables themselves do not have versions.

How is Mini DisplayPort different from full-size DisplayPort?

It isn't. Mini DisplayPort (mDP) is just a different shape connector. It is functionally identical to a full-size DisplayPort connector, there are no differences in capability, feature support, or compatibility with devices or adapters (other than the different physical shape). The data that goes through an mDP connector is exactly the same as the data that goes through a full-size DP connector. Passive DP-to-mDP adapters can be freely used to change between DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort to match whichever connector your device has without affecting the signal in any way.

How does the image quality of DisplayPort compare with DVI and HDMI?

The image quality of DisplayPort is identical to DVI and HDMI when set to the same image settings.

DisplayPort and HDMI do support a wider range of possible settings compared to DVI, but this does not affect anything on displays which don't take advantage of those extra capabilities. DVI supports up to 24 bit/px color depth (16.7 million colors), which is what most computer monitors and TVs run at. DisplayPort and HDMI are capable of higher color depth than 24 bit/px (like 30 bit/px or 1.07 billion colors) while DVI isn't, but this does not make them any better at displaying 24 bit/px color than DVI, so it is irrelevant on most standard displays.

Unless your display has capabilities that are beyond what DVI supports, there will be no advantage to using DP or HDMI instead of DVI.

Do DisplayPort cables affect image quality?

No, DisplayPort cables do not affect image quality. DisplayPort transmits data in a digital format, which means that the distortion from electromagnetic interference can be corrected by the receiving device, and the final image is always identical to what was originally sent by the source device. The image quality cannot be degraded by the cable, so the "cable quality" or "signal strength" are irrelevant to the appearance of the image. Features such as "gold-plated connectors" or "high-quality shielding" are superfluous and do not affect the image quality.

DisplayPort Standard

DisplayPort Source to HDMI Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

DisplayPort Source to HDMI Display
Possible with a passive adapter? Yes
Inline audio supported? Yes
Image Quality: Same as HDMI
Maximum Resolution / Frequency: Depends on equipment

Show DisplayPort to HDMI Adapter Limits

 

A simple and inexpensive passive adapter may be used to connect a DisplayPort source to an HDMI display. Any features common to both DisplayPort and HDMI will work through these adapters, such as inline audio, high color depth, or FreeSync if the monitor supports FreeSync-over-HDMI (not all FreeSync monitors support this). The maximum resolution and refresh frequency depend on the equipment used.

There are two types of passive DisplayPort to HDMI adapters which support different speeds:
  • Type 1 passive adapters support up to 4.95 Gbit/s (HDMI 1.2 speed; up to 1080p 60 Hz / 1440p 30 Hz)
  • Type 2 passive adapters support up to 9.0 Gbit/s (≈HDMI 1.4 speed; up to 1080p 120 Hz / 1440p 60 Hz / 4K 30 Hz)
    (For a more detailed list of resolutions and refresh rates supported by each type, refer to the table above)
  • DisplayPort 1.1 only supports Type 1 adapters*.
  • DisplayPort 1.2 (and higher) supports both Type 1 and Type 2 adapters.
    *(Type 2 adapters will still work in a DP 1.1 port, but will be capped to the same speed as a Type 1 adapter)
DisplayPort 1.3 and higher also have paper support for a third type of passive adapter which supports up to 18.0 Gbit/s (full HDMI 2.0 bandwidth), but no adapters of this type have been produced yet. As a result, HDMI 2.0 speeds are currently only possible with active adapters, regardless of DisplayPort version.

Using a DisplayPort to HDMI passive adapter does not provide any special advantage compared to a straight HDMI-to-HDMI connection. No additional bandwidth, features, or image improvements are inherited from DisplayPort by using a DP to HDMI adapter instead of a native HDMI output.

Retailers do not usually label their passive adapters as "Type 1" or "Type 2", so they must be identified by the maximum resolution claimed by the manufacturer. Type 1 passive adapters will usually list a maximum of 1920×1080 or 1920×1200 at 60 Hz, while Type 2 adapters will support up to 1920×1080 120 Hz or 4K 30 Hz.

Type 2 passive adapters are generally around the same price as a Type 1 adapter, so there is usually no reason to buy a Type 1 adapter anymore.

DisplayPort to HDMI passive adapters are not bi-directional, so they cannot be used to connect an HDMI source to a DisplayPort display.

DisplayPort to HDMI Type 2 passive adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US (1)  US (2)  UK  DE
DisplayPort to HDMI Type 2 passive adapter cable (1.8 meters):   Amazon US (1)  US (2)
Mini DisplayPort to HDMI Type 2 passive adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US  UK  DE
Mini DisplayPort to HDMI Type 2 passive adapter cable (1.8 meters):   Amazon US

Active Adapters

Using active adapters,
  • DisplayPort 1.0–1.1 can support up to HDMI 1.4 speeds (10.2 Gbit/s; 1080p 144 Hz / 4K 30 Hz)
  • DisplayPort 1.2–1.4 can support up to HDMI 2.0 speeds (18.0 Gbit/s; 1440p 144 Hz / 4K 60 Hz)
As with all active adapters, maximum resolution / refresh rate and features support are subject to each individual product's limitations, so read the product description. Not all DisplayPort to HDMI active adapters will support HDMI 2.0 speeds.

The recommendations listed below all support both DP 1.2+ to HDMI 2.0 conversion, with inline audio and full resolution/refresh rate/color support. They are not bi-directional, so they cannot be used to connect an HDMI computer/laptop/console to a DisplayPort display.

DisplayPort 1.2+ to HDMI 2.0 active adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US (1)  US (2)  UK (1)  UK (2)  DE (1)  DE (2)
Mini DisplayPort 1.2+ to HDMI 2.0 active adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US (1)  US (2)  UK  DE

Comments About Componentry Inside DisplayPort to HDMI Passive Adapters

Click to expand

I have seen some controversy over whether DisplayPort to HDMI passive adapters count as "passive" or not, because they have an integrated circuit inside, so I want to comment on this point.

Although DisplayPort sources support the direct output of TMDS-encoded HDMI signals, it sends them at DisplayPort's native voltage (3.3 V) with AC coupling instead of the DC-coupled 5 V used by HDMI and DVI. Passive DisplayPort to HDMI adapters have a conversion circuit inside them which converts the voltage of the signals from AC-coupled 3.3 V to DC-coupled 5 V, called a level shifter. This does not make it an "active adapter", because it is not decoding DisplayPort packets and converting the information contained into an equivalent data stream in the 3-channel TMDS format that HDMI uses. The initial signal received by the adapter is already in the 3-channel TMDS format used by HDMI, and the adapter has no effect on the digital values of the signals passing through it, and so does not "convert" or modify any information in the data stream. It is a simple voltage change for electrical compatibility between the two systems, and the circuit is powered by the integrated 3.3 V power line from the DisplayPort source.

The only real impact this has (from an engineering standpoint) is that it places a hard limit on what speeds a particular adapter can support, which is why there are different "types" of DP to HDMI adapters which support different speeds. This is because the output of the level shifter circuit needs to be able to keep up with frequency of the input signal (i.e. it needs to be able to change between 0 V and 5 V fast enough that it can generate digital signals at the required frequency). As new versions of HDMI keep doubling the frequency of the previous version, the DisplayPort to HDMI adapters made for the previous version are not suitable for supporting the newer speeds, so a new adapter using upgraded circuits is required each time.

Close


Note 1:Resolution and refresh frequency limitations on active adapters are subject to each individual product's limitations. Read the product description.

Note 2:Mini DisplayPort is functionally identical to DisplayPort, the only difference is the physical shape. Additional adapters to change between DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort can be used freely without affecting the operation or compatibility of other devices in any way.
DisplayPort Source to DVI Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

DisplayPort Source to DVI Display
Possible with a passive adapter? Yes
Inline audio supported? No
Image Quality: Same as DVI
Maximum Resolution / Frequency: Same as Single-Link DVI

Show DVI Limits

 

A passive adapter can be used to connect a DisplayPort output to a DVI input. This is equivalent to a Single-LinkDVI-D connection. Inline audio is not supported. These adapters can still be used to connect to monitors that have Dual-Link DVI ports, but the connection will be limited to the capabilities of Single-Link DVI as outlined in the table above (click here).

All DisplayPort to DVI passive adapters are Single-Link only. DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI passive adapters do not exist. Although most DisplayPort to DVI passive adapters are advertised as "Dual-Link" and may appear to have "Dual-Link" connectors on them, please be warned that these are fake. The extra pins on these DVI connectors are dummy pins which are not connected to anything, and the adapter will still only function as a Single-Link DVI adapter. It is physically impossible to create a passive DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapter due to an insufficient number of pins on the DisplayPort connector.

DisplayPort to DVI passive adapters are not bi-directional, so they cannot be used to connect a DVI source to a DisplayPort display.

DisplayPort to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)
DisplayPort to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter cable (1.8 meters, latching):   Amazon US
DisplayPort to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter cable (1.8 meters, non-latching):   Amazon US
Mini DisplayPort to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)

Active Adapters (Single-Link DVI)

Inexpensive DisplayPort to Single-Link DVI active adapters exist. These are intended for multi-monitor configurations on some older graphics cards which do not support more than two monitors through DVI / HDMI, including DisplayPort to DVI / HDMI passive adapters; these graphics cards are identified here. Generally speaking, any inexpensive DisplayPort to DVI active adapter is Single-Link-only. As with passive adapters, these may appear to have "Dual-Link" connectors on them and may be advertised as "Dual-Link", so it is advised to read the description carefully to look for the maximum resolution and refresh frequency that the adapter claims to support. Single-Link DVI adapters will be limited to 1920×1200 @ 60 Hz or 2560×1600 @ 30 Hz.

DisplayPort to Single-Link DVI active adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)

Active Adapters (Dual-Link DVI)

A more complex active adapter is required to convert DisplayPort to a full Dual-Link DVI connection. Please note that DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI active adapters can be somewhat unreliable, so these should only be considered as a last resort.

DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI active adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)   Amazon US (3)
Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI active adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)

Comments About Componentry Inside DisplayPort to DVI Passive Adapters

Click to expand

I have seen some controversy over whether DisplayPort to DVI passive adapters count as "passive" or not, because they have an integrated circuit inside, so I want to comment on this point.

Although DisplayPort sources support the direct output of TMDS-encoded DVI signals, it sends them at DisplayPort's native voltage (3.3 V) with AC coupling instead of the DC-coupled 5 V used by HDMI and DVI. Passive DisplayPort to DVI adapters have a conversion circuit inside them which converts the voltage of the signals from AC-coupled 3.3 V to DC-coupled 5 V, called a level shifter. This does not make it an "active adapter", because it is not decoding DisplayPort packets and converting the information contained into an equivalent data stream in the 3-channel TMDS format that DVI uses. The initial signal received by the adapter is already in the 3-channel TMDS format used by DVI, and the adapter has no effect on the digital values of the signals passing through it, and so does not "convert" or modify any information in the data stream. It is a simple voltage change for electrical compatibility between the two systems, and the circuit is powered by the integrated 3.3 V power line from the DisplayPort source.

Close


Note 1:Resolution and refresh frequency limitations on active adapters are subject to each individual product's limitations. Read the product description.

Note 2:Any DVI-Ddevice or cable will also work in a DVI-Iport. If your display has a DVI-Iport, you do not need to search specifically for a "DisplayPort to DVI-I" adapter.

Note 3:Mini DisplayPort is functionally identical to DisplayPort, the only difference is the physical shape. Additional adapters to change between DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort can be used freely without affecting the operation or compatibility of other devices in any way.
DisplayPort Source to VGA Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

DisplayPort Source to VGA Display
Possible with a passive adapter? No

Passive DisplayPort to VGA adapters do not actually exist, but active DisplayPort to VGA adapters are inexpensive and require no additional power, so they are often mistaken as passive adapters.

Active Adapters

DisplayPort to VGA active adapters are inexpensive and reliable, and require no additional power connectors. If your graphics card has no native VGA or DVI-Ioutput, then DisplayPort to VGA is the preferred way of connecting to a VGA display, generally more preferred than an HDMI to VGA or DVI-Dto VGA active adapter. Since DisplayPort to VGA adapters perform active conversion, they will also work in newer graphics cards without native VGA support, such as the AMD Radeon R9 290X or NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 or newer.

DisplayPort to VGA active adapters are often mistaken as passive adapters because of their low cost and size and lack of external power, but all DisplayPort to VGA adapters are active adapters.

Yes, even this is an active adapter, not a passive adapter.

DisplayPort to VGA active adapter dongle (use with VGA cable):   Amazon US
DisplayPort to VGA active adapter cable (1.8 meters):   Amazon US


Note 1:Resolution and refresh frequency limitations on active adapters are subject to each individual product's limitations. Read the product description.

Note 2:Mini DisplayPort is functionally identical to DisplayPort, the only difference is the physical shape. Additional adapters to change between DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort can be used freely without affecting the operation or compatibility of other devices in any way.
DisplayPort Source to USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode Display [Link]

A DisplayPort output cannot be connected to a USB Type-C input. No passive or active adapters exist for this combination.

USB Type-C to DisplayPort adapters work from a USB-C source to a DisplayPort display, but not the reverse configuration.

DisplayPort Source to Thunderbolt 3 Display [Link]

A DisplayPort output cannot be connected to a Thunderbolt 3 input. No passive or active adapters exist for this combination.

USB Type-C to DisplayPort adapters work from a Thunderbolt 3 source to a DisplayPort display, but not the reverse configuration.

DisplayPort Source to Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

DisplayPort Source to TB or TB2 Display
Possible with a passive adapter? No

A plain DisplayPort source cannot connect to a display's Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 input port. Only a Thunderbolt source can connect to a Thunderbolt input port on a display. Furthermore, a Thunderbolt cable must be used, not a Mini DisplayPort cable. Despite having an identical connector, Thunderbolt cables have additional electronics inside which Mini DisplayPort cables do not have.

However, the Apple Thunderbolt Display was the only monitor ever produced with no other inputs besides Thunderbolt. All other monitors ever produced with Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 inputs also have native DisplayPort inputs which can be used if you need to connect a plain DisplayPort source.

Active Adapters Adapters

There are no active adapters for converting a DisplayPort source to a Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 display.

HDMI Source to DisplayPort Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

HDMI Source to DisplayPort Display
Possible with a passive adapter? No

An HDMI output CANNOT be connected to a DisplayPort input with a passive adapter. Passive DisplayPort to HDMI cables/adapters will only function from DisplayPort output to HDMI input, not the other way around.

Active Adapters

Conversion from HDMI to DisplayPort requires an active adapter. Please note that these adapters are very unreliable and should only be considered as a last resort. Most HDMI to DisplayPort active adapters do not support the newest HDCP protocols and so they will not work with modern game consoles. I am not aware of any HDMI 2.0+ to DisplayPort 1.2+ active adapters at this time.

HDMI 1.4 to DisplayPort 1.1 active adapter dongle (use with DisplayPort cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)   Amazon US (3)
HDMI 1.2 to DisplayPort 1.1 active adapter dongle (use with an HDMI and a DisplayPort cable):   Amazon US


Note 1:Resolution and refresh frequency limitations on active adapters are subject to each individual product's limitations. Read the product description.

Note 2:Mini DisplayPort is functionally identical to DisplayPort, the only difference is the physical shape. Additional adapters to change between DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort can be used freely without affecting the operation or compatibility of other devices in any way.

 


HDMI Capabilities
Inline Audio Yes
HDR Yes (version 2.0a+)
No (version 1.0–2.0)
Multiple Video Streams
From a Single Port
Splitters/Hubs: No
Daisy-Chaining: No
Power Delivery
(for charging)
None

Cabling

Main article here.

HDMI cables do not have versions. There is no such thing as an "HDMI 1.4 cable" or an "HDMI 2.0 cable". All HDMI features such as inline audio, ARC, HDR, and others will work over any cable. There are however several different tiers of HDMI cable rated by bandwidth. High resolutions and refresh rates require better rated cables, but nothing else depends on the cable. See the main article for more details.

Compatibility

All HDMI devices are compatible with all other HDMI devices and cables, regardless of the version of each device or cable certification tier. When connecting two HDMI devices that have different versions, the capabilities and features available are determined by the lower of the two versions. For example if a GPU with HDMI 2.0 support is plugged into a monitor with an HDMI 1.4 port, the connection will be limited to only the bandwidth and features provided by HDMI 1.4. HDMI cables themselves do not have versions. They affect bandwidth, but not version or feature support.

Do I need to get a special HDMI cable to handle 4K 60 Hz?

Main article here.

Not usually. Although not guaranteed, most normal High Speed HDMI cables are capable of handling 4K 60 Hz just fine, and "4K compatible" HDMI cables are generally not necessary. See the main article for more details.

Do HDMI cables affect image quality?

No, HDMI cables do not affect image quality. HDMI transmits data in a digital format, which means that the distortion from electromagnetic interference can be corrected by the receiving device, and the final image is always identical to what was originally sent by the source device. The image quality cannot be degraded by the cable, so the "cable quality" or "signal strength" are irrelevant to the appearance of the image. Features such as "gold-plated connectors" or "high-quality shielding" are superfluous and do not affect the image quality.

How does the image quality of HDMI compare with DisplayPort and DVI?

The image quality of HDMI is identical to DisplayPort and DVI when set to the same image settings.

HDMI and DisplayPort do support a wider range of possible settings compared to DVI, but this does not affect anything on displays which don't take advantage of those extra capabilities. DVI supports up to 24 bit/px color depth (16.7 million colors), which is what most computer monitors and TVs run at. DisplayPort and HDMI are capable of higher color depth than 24 bit/px (like 30 bit/px or 1.07 billion colors) while DVI isn't, but this does not make them any better at displaying 24 bit/px color than DVI, so it is irrelevant on most standard displays.

Unless your display has capabilities that are beyond what DVI supports, there will be no advantage to using DP or HDMI instead of DVI.

Is HDMI limited to 60 Hz?

Main article here.

No, HDMI is not limited to 60 Hz. Many 1080p 120+ Hz displays are limited to 60 Hz on their HDMI ports, but that is a limitation of those particular products, not a limitation of the HDMI standard. See the main article for more details.

HDMI 2.1 Notes

The new HDMI 2.1 version has recently (at the time of writing) been announced. It increases the maximum transmission bandwidth to 48.0 Gbit/s. New "48G" HDMI cables will be required to take advantage of the higher data rate, but other features of HDMI 2.1 that are unrelated to bandwidth (such as dynamic HDR metadata or Game Mode VRR) will not require new cables.

HDMI 2.1 achieves 48 Gbit/s bandwidth by doubling the signaling frequency to 12 GHz (compared to 6 GHz in HDMI 2.0), as well as adding an additional data channel (4 channels total, compared to 3 in HDMI 2.0). This will not require a change in the physical connector, so 48G HDMI cables and HDMI 2.1 devices will still be usable with previous-version HDMI devices and other HDMI cable types. The fourth data channel will use pins 10 and 12 on the HDMI connector, previously used for the TMDS clock signal (which is now embedded in the data channel signals in HDMI 2.1). In previous HDMI versions, this clock signal ran at only one-tenth the frequency that the data channels ran at (600 MHz in HDMI 2.0), but in HDMI 2.1 this channel runs at 12 GHz like the other data channels, twenty times the frequency required by HDMI 2.0. As a result, previous HDMI cables (Premium, High Speed, and Standard Speed HDMI cables) are not suitable for 12 GHz signaling on these pins and will not be capable of facilitating the full 48 Gbit/s bandwidth of HDMI 2.0. New 48G cables with a much more tightly controlled pair on pins 10 and 12 will be required for this. These cables will still be compatible with previous HDMI versions.

What can be done with 48 Gbit/s bandwidth? Some people say 8K 60 Hz 4:4:4 uncompressed is possible, based on some quick math: 60 frame/s × (7680 × 4320) px/frame × 24 bit/px = 47,775,744,000 bit/s, or 47.8 Gbit/s, which does seem to fit (barely) within 48.0 Gbit/s. However, this is incorrect as it is missing two things.

First, 48.0 Gbit/s is the transmission bandwidth of HDMI 2.1, not the data rate. The maximum data rate will be some fraction of the bandwidth, the exact numbers depending on the encoding scheme being used. Previous versions of HDMI used 8b/10b encoding, where the maximum data rate was 80% (8/10ths) of the bandwidth; for example, HDMI 2.0 with a bandwidth of 18.0 Gbit/s had a maximum data rate of 14.4 Gbit/s. HDMI 2.1 uses 16b/18b encoding, which gives it a maximum data rate of 42.66 Gbit/s.

That alone is enough to show that HDMI 2.1 isn't capable of 8K 60 Hz uncompressed, since the 47.8 Gbit/s data rate required is more than what HDMI 2.1 provides. However, that isn't all; data rate required is actually greater than 47.8 Gbit/s, because that calculation doesn't take timing format into account.

Timing format (such as CVT, CVT-RB, or CVT-R2) slightly increases the data rate required for a video signal. Displays need small pauses in the data stream between frames (known as blanking intervals), so in order to keep the framerate the same, during the time the data stream is active, it needs to be sent at a slightly higher rate than if it were being sent continuously. As such, the cabling system needs to be able to handle this slightly higher data rate. CVT-R2 is currently the most efficient standardized timing format. If you include overhead for CVT-R2 timing, 8K 60 Hz with 24 bit/px color would require 49.7 Gbit/s, not 47.8.

So yes HDMI 2.1 does need to use compression to achieve 8K 60 Hz with 4:4:4 color, both in theory and in practice. According to the HDMI consortium, HDMI 2.1 implements VESA's DSC 1.2 compression algorithm for display modes beyond 8K with 4:2:0 subsampling. DSC is claimed to be "visually lossless" (meaning yes it's lossy, but very unlikely to be noticeable), with near-zero latency and low cost/complexity, although no actual implementations of DSC have been seen in the market yet so no consumer testing has been done.

HDMI Standard

HDMI Source to DVI Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

HDMI Source to DVI Display
Possible with a passive adapter? Yes
Inline audio supported? Not usually (depends on the display)
Image Quality: Same as DVI
Maximum Resolution / Frequency: Same as Single-Link DVI

Show DVI Limits

 

A passive adapter can be used to connect an HDMI output to a DVI input. This is equivalent to a native Single-LinkDVI-D connection. Inline audio is not supported. These adapters can still be used to connect to monitors that have Dual-Link DVI ports, but the connection will be limited to the capabilities of Single-Link DVI as outlined in the table below.

All HDMI to DVI passive adapters are Single-Link only. HDMI to Dual-Link DVI passive adapters do not exist. Although most HDMI to DVI passive adapters are advertised as "Dual-Link" and may appear to have "Dual-Link" connectors on them, please be warned that these are fake. The extra pins on these DVI connectors are dummy pins which are not connected to anything, and the adapter will still only function as a Single-Link DVI adapter. It is physically impossible to create a passive HDMI to Dual-Link DVI adapter due to an insufficient number of pins on the HDMI connector.

Since HDMI is only capable of passively adapting to Single-LinkDVI-D (and not DVI-I), this means it is not possible to make a chain of adapters from HDMI → DVI → VGA. Passive DVI to VGA adapters are not supported on all DVI ports, they only work in special DVI + VGA combo ports called DVI-I. An HDMI to DVI passive adapter only provides a standard DVI-D port, not DVI-I.

HDMI to DVI passive adapters are bi-directional, so the same adapter can be used both from an HDMI source to a DVI display, and from a DVI source to an HDMI display.

HDMI to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US
HDMI to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US
HDMI to Single-LinkDVI-D passive adapter cable (2.0 meters):   Amazon US

Active Adapters

An active adapter would be required to convert HDMI output to a full Dual-Link DVI signal, but at the time of writing I am not aware of any such adapters existing.


Note 1:Any DVI-Ddevice or cable will also work in a DVI-Iport. If your display has a DVI-Iport, you do not need to search specifically for an "HDMI to DVI-I" adapter.
HDMI Source to VGA Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

HDMI Source to VGA Display
Possible with a passive adapter? No

It is not possible to connect HDMI output to VGA input with a passive adapter.

It is also not possible to create a chain of adapters from HDMI → DVI → VGA. Passive DVI to VGA adapters do not work in all DVI ports. They only work in special DVI + VGA combo ports called DVI-I. HDMI only supports passive adapters to DVI-D, not to DVI-I.

Active Adapters

Conversion from HDMI to VGA requires an active adapter. HDMI to VGA active adapters are fairly inexpensive and generally reliable.

HDMI to VGA active adapter dongle (use with VGA cable):   Amazon US
HDMI to VGA active adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US


Note:Resolution and refresh frequency limitations on active adapters are subject to each individual product's limitations. Read the product description.
HDMI Source to USB Type-C DisplayPort Alternate Mode Display [Link]

An HDMI output cannot be connected to a USB Type-C input. No passive or active adapters exist for this combination.

USB Type-C to HDMI adapters work from a USB-C source to an HDMI display, but not the reverse configuration.

HDMI Source to Thunderbolt 3 Display [Link]

An HDMI output cannot be connected to a Thunderbolt 3 input. No passive or active adapters exist for this combination.

USB Type-C to HDMI adapters work from a Thunderbolt 3 source to an HDMI display, but not the reverse configuration.

DVI Source to DisplayPort Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

DVI Source to DisplayPort Display
Possible with a passive adapter? No

A DVI output CANNOT be connected to a DisplayPort input with a passive adapter. Passive DisplayPort to DVI cables/adapters will only function from DisplayPort output to DVI input, not the other way around.

Active Adapters

Conversion from DVI to DisplayPort requires an active adapter.

Single-LinkDVI-D to DisplayPort 1.1 active adapter dongle (use with DisplayPort cable):   Amazon US (1)   Amazon US (2)
Single-LinkDVI-D to Mini DisplayPort 1.1 active adapter dongle (use with Mini DisplayPort cable):   Amazon US


Note 1:Resolution and refresh frequency limitations on active adapters are subject to each individual product's limitations. Read the product description.

Note 2:Any DVI-Ddevice or cable will also work in a DVI-Iport. If your graphics card has a DVI-Iport, you do not need to search specifically for a "DVI-Ito DisplayPort" active adapter.

Note 3:Mini DisplayPort is functionally identical to DisplayPort, the only difference is the physical shape. Additional adapters to change between DisplayPort and Mini DisplayPort can be used freely without affecting the operation or compatibility of other devices in any way.
DVI Source to HDMI Display [Link]

Passive Adapters

DVI Source to HDMI Display
Possible with a passive adapter? Yes
Inline audio supported? Yes
Image Quality: Same as HDMI
Maximum Resolution / Frequency: Same as HDMI (version depends on equipment)

Show HDMI Limits

 

A passive adapter can be used to connect a DVI output to an HDMI input. It does not matter what type of DVI port is used (DVI-D, DVI-I, Single/Dual-Link), all of them function identically when connected to an HDMI port.

A DVI output to HDMI input connection with a passive adapter has the same capabilities as a native HDMI connection. All HDMI-specific features such as inline audio will work when a DVI to HDMI adapter is used from a DVI source to an HDMI display.

DVI to HDMI adapters are not strictly limited to the speed Single-LinkDVI-D. Some adapters will only support speeds up to 165 MHz (4.95 Gbit/s, the speed of HDMI 1.2 and Single-Link DVI), but some will support up to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbit/s, the speed of HDMI 1.4). DVI ports on graphics cards do support the output of these high-frequency Single-Link signals, even though they are only used by HDMI, not by DVI. Modern DVI output ports are designed to be able to send HDMI signals.

Please note that this information only applies from DVI output to HDMI input. It does not apply to the reverse configuration (HDMI source to DVI display). Adapter compatibility and rules are not symmetric. Please click here to see information for a DVI source to an HDMI display.

DVI to HDMI passive adapters are bi-directional, so the same adapters are used for both DVI source to HDMI display and HDMI source to DVI display.

Single-LinkDVI-D to Standard Speed HDMI passive adapter dongle (use with HDMI cable):   Amazon US
Single-LinkDVI-D to Standard Speed HDMI passive adapter dongle (use with DVI cable):   Amazon US
Single-LinkDVI-D to High Speed HDMI passive adapter cable (2.0 meters):   Amazon US

Active Adapters

To my knowledge, there are no active adapters available for converting DVI to HDMI, but there is really no reason for them to exist anyway. Modern graphics cards allow HDMI 1.4 signals to be sent through Single-Link DVI to HDMI passive adapters, which gives equivalent bandwidth to Dual-Link DVI. Therefore Dual-Link DVI to HDMI active adapters are not necessary.


Note 1:Any DVI-Ddevice or cable will also work in a DVI-Iport. If your graphics card has a DVI-Iport, you do not need to search specifically for a "DVI-Ito HDMI" adapter.
Sours: https://glenwing.github.io/adapters/?output=HDMI
Best Displayport Cables To Buy In 2021

If your current HDMI cables are working fine, keep them. But if you’ve recently upgraded to a 4K TV or source and your HDMI cable no longer passes audio or video signals reliably, we recommend the Monoprice 4K Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable. This cable is certified to deliver 4K high dynamic range (HDR) video at 60 Hz, which is all that most people need to watch movies and TV shows. For PC and console gamers who require even more bandwidth, we have cable recommendations for that, too.

The Monoprice 4K Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable is a great cable for connecting a 4K TV to most HD and Ultra HD sources (such as a cable or satellite box, a Blu-ray player, a media streamer, or an older game console). As the name suggests, this cable is certified by HDMI Licensing Administrator to pass 4K HDR signals, with a bandwidth up to 18 gigabits per second. In our tests, the Monoprice 4K cable passed even higher bandwidths than that, even though it’s not certified to do so. It is available with free shipping and a lifetime warranty, in lengths from 3 to 30 feet. Monoprice’s Certified Premium cables are also available in a slimmer style, in sizes from 1 to 8 feet. So whether you need a short, skinny cable or a longer length to make your installation work, Monoprice likely has an inexpensive option that will do the job.

Although our top pick will suffice for most people, hardcore gamers and 8K TV owners may need an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable, which is capable of transmitting higher resolutions and frame rates at a bandwidth up to 48 Gbps. You don’t need that much bandwidth just to pass 4K HDR movies and TV shows between a TV and source device. But the Sony PlayStation 5, the Microsoft Xbox Series X, and high-end gaming PCs are capable of outputting 4K video at 120 frames per second (or 4K 120 Hz), which requires more bandwidth. If you have one of these devices—as well as one of the few TVs that can accept this higher-bandwidth signal—you need an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable. Likewise, if you’ve purchased (or plan to purchase) an 8K TV and want to make sure your cables are ready for future 8K sources, you might want to go ahead and upgrade your cables.

Fortunately, Ultra High Speed HDMI cables don’t cost that much more than regular HDMI cables. In our testing, the 6-foot Monoprice 8K Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable worked perfectly, and Monoprice offers free shipping and a lifetime warranty. It’s also available in lengths of 1.5, 3, and 8 feet. There were no performance differences between the Monoprice and the other Ultra High Speed HDMI cables we tested (nor should there be), so any of them would be a fine choice.

Why you should trust us

In addition to being the editor at large for Wirecutter, I’ve reviewed and written about HDMI extensively for CNET, Forbes, and several other outlets. I’ve also interviewed multiple cable manufacturers and representatives of HDMI Licensing Administrator, the organization in charge of the HDMI specification.

Senior staff writer Chris Heinonen, who has reviewed TVs and home theater equipment since 2008 and is an ISF Level II–certified calibrator, performed additional cable testing.

Who this is for

If your entertainment system is still rocking basic HD sources such as a cable or satellite box, a Blu-ray player, or a streaming media player, and your current HDMI cables are working fine, you don’t need to buy new cables. There’s no performance boost to be had.

But if you have bought new 4K gear or are planning on buying new 4K gear, you might need new cables. Depending on when you bought your cables, and how well made they are, they might work with 4K video and maybe even high dynamic range (HDR) video. Or they might not. The only way to find out is to test them: Set your 4K source—say, an Apple TV or a PlayStation game console—to output 4K HDR to your TV. If you don’t get an image, you probably need new cables.

Passing a 4K HDR video signal between a TV and a source requires more data than passing 720p or 1080p HD video. To do so reliably, you need at least a High Speed HDMI cable. The “High Speed” designation means that the cable is rated to deliver at least 18 Gbps of bandwidth; that’s ample bandwidth for movies and TV shows, which generally appear at a frame rate of 24, 30, or 60 frames per second. An “Ultra High Speed” designation means that the HDMI cable is rated to pass an even higher bandwidth of 48 Gbps, which is currently necessary only for certain gaming sources that can output a 120 fps frame rate.

The longer the cable, or the less well made it is, the less likely it will work with higher resolutions, even if it worked with 1080p. Though this is not a perfect analogy, think of the problem as trying to force too much water through a pipe that’s too small: A “1080p” amount of water works fine, but the “2160p” amount of water required for 4K can’t fit through the pipe and allow the TV to display the image.

You may also see the words “HDMI 2.0” or “HDMI 2.1” on a cable’s packaging and marketing materials. This label does not refer to a type of cable. Instead, it relates to specific features and capabilities in HDMI-equipped TVs and sources. Despite the nominal numerical change, HDMI 2.1 represents a huge increase in features and capability over HDMI 2.0, including resolution capacity up to 10K, higher potential frame rates, eARC, and gaming-friendly features such as automatic low-latency mode and adaptive frame rate. You can read more about HDMI 2.1 in our blog post about 8K TV.

To take advantage of HDMI 2.1 features, you need TVs and sources that support them. Many of the latest TVs support some HDMI 2.1 features but not necessarily all of them. Few support the higher bandwidth necessary for gaming (see our recommendations of the best TVs for video games). With the exception of the two newest gaming consoles or a high-end PC, there are no sources right now that output the higher resolutions and frame rates that require Ultra High Speed HDMI cables.

A High Speed HDMI cable can pass a lot of HDMI 2.1 features (if both the TV and source support them), but only an Ultra High Speed HDMI cable is guaranteed to pass the higher resolutions and frame rates possible with HDMI 2.1.

How we picked and tested

HDMI cables either work or they don’t. It’s not possible, due to how they function, for different HDMI cables with the same speed rating to deliver varying picture or sound quality. (See the Additional science and testing section for more on this subject.) A well-built cable is likely to deliver AV signals more reliably than a poorly built cable, especially over longer runs, but more expensive HDMI cables do not offer any AV performance advantage over cheap cables of the same type. All that is to say, a $100 HDMI cable that successfully passes 4K signals produces results that look and sound the same as what you get from a $10 HDMI cable that successfully passes 4K signals.

With that in mind, we knew that we could greatly simplify our criteria for what models to call in and test. We looked for cables that were rated as High Speed or Ultra High Speed, were easy to get, came from reputable companies, and preferably had lifetime warranties.

Two signal analyzers side-by-side

For our initial testing of High Speed cables in 2015, we brought in 3- and 15-foot cables, testing them on equipment including a Denon AVR-S930H receiver and a JVC DLA-RS440 4K projector with an Oppo UDP-203 Ultra HD Blu-ray player as the 4K HDR source. In 2018 Chris Heinonen expanded our testing further, using a Murideo Six-G generator and Six-A analyzer to double-check that all the cables could handle the 18 Gbps required for 4K HDR video. (They all could.)

More expensive HDMI cables do not offer any AV performance advantage over cheap cables.

To test Ultra High Speed cables for our most recent update, we used an Xbox Series X game console running at 4K 120 Hz (with variable refresh rate enabled) and a GeForce RTX 3070 graphics card operating at the same resolution and refresh rate. We used TVs from LG, Samsung, and Vizio that had Ultra High Speed HDMI inputs, and we played games for a while using each cable. All the cables we tested that were rated for 48 Gbps worked perfectly in our tests—and the 18 Gbps Monoprice 4K cable also worked fine in this setup. The cables we used in these tests were around 6 feet in length.

We didn’t test any cables longer than 15 feet for this guide, but we do have some recommendations based on personal experience in the “Our pick” section.

Our pick: Monoprice 4K Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable

A Monoprice 4K Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable

The inexpensive Monoprice 4K Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable performed perfectly in our testing, and it’s certified to handle resolutions up to 4K at 60 Hz, the most common resolution and refresh rate for modern TVs and sources. The cost includes shipping, and the cable has a lifetime warranty—so if something goes wrong, you can get it replaced. If you need very long or short cables to make your setup work, this cable comes in lengths ranging from 3 to 30 feet. For a little extra money, Monoprice offers a thinner version, as well.

The “Certified Premium” label means that these cables are guaranteed to work with 4K HDR video. Or as HDMI Licensing Administrator describes it, “The [Certified Premium] program is designed to give end users confidence when purchasing new HDMI cables for their 4K/UltraHD products that may include features such as [email protected], BT.2020 and HDR.” Certification doesn’t mean that the cables work better than non-certified cables, just that they’ve gone through an additional testing stage so their maker can market them as Certified Premium and therefore imply that they work. We tested them anyway, and they passed.

The Monoprice 4K Certified Premium cable is a bit thick and doesn’t bend easily. Depending on your setup, a thinner, easier-to-bend cable might be preferable. In that case, the Monoprice 4K Slim Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable is available in lengths of 1 to 8 feet. It is slightly more expensive, but it’s also a lot thinner and easier to manage in tight spaces.

If you want to skip long wires altogether, check out our guide to the best wireless HDMI video transmitter. Keep in mind, though, that currently no wireless HDMI transmitter can pass an HDR signal and only a few can handle 4K, so we don’t recommend them for anyone who wants to watch 4K HDR video.

Upgrade pick: Monoprice 8K Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable

A Monoprice 8K Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable

All of the Ultra High Speed cables we tested performed as expected, but we chose the Monoprice 8K Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable for its lifetime warranty and free shipping. Plus, Monoprice has been making inexpensive but high-quality HDMI cables for a long time, and we are confident in recommending them. That said, you likely don’t need this cable unless you own an 8K TV and want to future-proof your system or you’re a gamer who owns a console or PC that can output higher-bandwidth signals to a TV that supports those signals.

“Ultra High Speed” is the newest classification of HDMI cable. Such cables are designed to handle bit rates to 48 Gbps, up from the 18 Gbps of High Speed HDMI cables like our top pick. The only devices that currently take advantage of this extra bandwidth are Sony’s PlayStation 5, Microsoft’s Xbox Series X, and PC video cards that can display 4K at 120 frames per second. The PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X consoles both come with an Ultra High Speed cable in the box, and those cables worked fine in our test setup—but if you need one of a different length or have a compatible AV receiver or other device between your source and your TV, you might need additional cables.

Keep in mind that you also need a TV capable of taking advantage of this higher frame rate. Most TVs, even those a few years old that claim a “120 Hz” rate, can’t. See our guide to the best TV for video games for more.

However, we were a little surprised to find that our top pick, the Monoprice 4K Certified Premium High Speed HDMI Cable, also performed flawlessly in these tests. The 3-, 6-, and 8-foot cables worked at 4K 120 Hz—without any sync issues or sparkles—with all of our sources and TVs. So if you already have one or more of those HDMI cables, you might not need to replace them even if you upgrade your gaming console and TV. Unfortunately, there’s no way to tell if they’ll work just by looking at the cables themselves; you’ll need to test them on your own gear. If the TV says it’s getting a 4K 120 Hz signal, you’re good to go.

But if you do need new cables, the Monoprice 8K Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable is available in lengths from 1.5 to 8 feet and has a lifetime warranty, which is a big reason we made it our upgrade pick.

Other HDMI cables we like

The AmazonBasics High-Speed HDMI Cable was originally our top recommendation in this guide, primarily because it was slightly cheaper than the Monoprice 4K cable and came with free shipping for Prime subscribers. Now that Monoprice offers free shipping for everyone, the prices are more comparable. This AmazonBasics cable isn’t Certified Premium, but it performed perfectly well in our tests. A newer, Certified Premium version (which we have not tested) is slightly more expensive than the Monoprice pick and is available in lengths from 3 to 15 feet.

The Anker Ultra High Speed HDMI Cable was a little more flexible than the other Ultra High Speed cables we tested, and it was the only one to carry the HDMI certification logo on its packaging, which might account for its slightly higher price over the Monoprice 8K cable. We saw no difference in performance between the two, but the Anker cable has a shorter, 18-month warranty, and during our testing period we saw more stock and availability issues on this model. If you feel more comfortable using only certified cables, this one is up to the task.

The Cable Matters Premium Braided 48Gbps Ultra HD 8K HDMI Cable was the lowest-priced Ultra High Speed cable we tested, and it performed just as reliably as the Monoprice and Anker cables. But the warranty is vague; we had to email Cable Matters to get the warranty info and were told that this cable has a “limited lifetime warranty” with no further explanation offered. In addition, the cable is available only in silver, not black, so it drew more attention to itself in our gear rack—but that really comes down to personal preference.

Running in-wall cables

Before you run HDMI (or any wires) through your walls:

  • Check the wire
  • Check local building codes

Make sure to thoroughly check how well your cable works with your gear before you run it through your walls. This may sound obvious, but you might be shocked (and saddened) by how many emails I get from people who didn’t do this.

Also check your local building codes in case you need to run conduit. One option is Monoprice’s Commercial Series cable, which is CL2 rated to run in the wall, supports a speed of 18 Gbps, and comes in lengths up to 50 feet.

The competition

You can find countless HDMI cables that range in price from “a lot” to “are you kidding me.”

Going through each brand and cable isn’t necessary, as there are only two claims these cables make to justify their prices, and both are easily refuted.

1. Better picture and/or sound quality: As we discussed earlier, this isn’t possible. The only way a cable could make your content look or sound better is if it actually changed the data flowing across it. Not only is that impossible, but if any of the data going across somehow got changed, the only two possible results at the TV end would be sparkles (an effect, quite noticeable, due to a pixel dropping out) or the entire image dropping out. The image can’t look sharper (or softer), brighter (or dimmer), or more colorful (or muted). This would mean huge aspects of the image have changed, and HDMI cables just don’t work like that. It would be like saying a better Ethernet cable changes what your emails say. Same idea.

The only exception to this otherwise absolute fact is if two cables are rated differently. A cable whose label claims it can do only 18 Gbps probably can’t send the amount of data that a cable rated for 48 Gbps can. The 48 Gbps cable is just a larger “pipe,” so to speak. Or to put it all another way, a 1-inch pipe carries the same amount of water as any other 1-inch pipe—but if your water heater has only a ½-inch nozzle, a bigger pipe running to it won’t make any difference. But two cables that can both transmit 48 Gbps will produce results that look the same.

There are people all over the internet who claim to have seen huge improvements after switching to expensive HDMI cables. Objectively, this isn’t possible.

Over longer runs, the signal can degrade, but that doesn’t mean the image itself degrades. There is no linear correlation between signal quality and picture quality. This isn’t analog. That isn’t how HDMI cables work. The image will look perfect, regardless of the signal strength, up to the point where dropouts or sparkles happen. After that, there’s nothing. Before that, it’s perfect.

There are people all over the internet who claim to have seen huge improvements after switching to expensive HDMI cables. Objectively, this isn’t possible. There are any number of possibilities regarding what’s going on (different settings, confirmation bias, HDMI cable company employees).

2. Better made: The other common boast is that more expensive HDMI cables are better made, a claim that implies they’ll last longer. Whether that’s true is actually pretty irrelevant. Monoprice, for example, has a lifetime warranty on its cables, so even if one breaks, you can get a new one.

Even if that weren’t true, and let’s say for some reason the $8 HDMI cable you buy lasts only two years (it will likely last longer) and you need to replace it, you’ve spent $16 total. How is a $100 HDMI cable that lasts four years a better deal?

Additional science and testing

No one has researched and written more about HDMI cables than I have. Since 2011, my “Why all HDMI cables are the same” series of articles at CNET have had millions of pageviews and have been heavily scrutinized. If you want additional objective testing, here are a few great sources worth reading.

Audioholics did a massive article years ago testing long HDMI cables. Some advice there is a touch dated, but the core of the science is still sound: “I have to come away saying that most cables under 4-5 meters will pass just about anything in today’s arsenal of 1080p.” Or if you prefer a shorter, more succinct version, look to the slightly more recent “The Truth vs Hype about Expensive HDMI Cables” and its analysis: “So, does a $10 HDMI cable make your system look or sound different from a $100 or $1,000 cable? The short answer is ‘Absolutely not.’”

Eurogamer did a similar test, comparing the actual output frames: “[T]he conclusion is that you can run any HDMI cable - no matter how cheap - and get identical results.” The writer continues, “[T]he important thing to point out is that there is no real parallel with the world of analogue cables.”

Here’s a reference in Popular Mechanics in “Brand-Name HDMI Cables: Are They Worth It?”: “The fact is, HDMI is digital, meaning you either get the feed or you don’t. High prices and gimmicks like gold-plating don’t affect 1s and 0s. Our advice: Purchase your wiring online for cheap, and use the saved money to upgrade to a larger flat screen.”

PCMag tested 12 cables of different lengths using a Murideo Six-G signal generator and found that most of them, including several Monoprice models, had no issues with 4K/60 HDR.

And although this is another article of mine, it shows all the hands-on testing I did leading up to the first CNET article. “The fact is, below 50 feet, performance is going to be a LOT more uniform. In other words, you’ll have more cables that will work on everything. As such, it’s even more likely that a cheap cable will perform the same as their more expensive counterparts. At short distances (under 10 feet), like we’ve always said, there’s not going to be any difference.”

Sources

  1. Buying Guide, HDMI Licensing Administrator

  2. Geoffrey Morrison, Why all HDMI cables are the same, CNET, October 11, 2012

  3. Geoffrey Morrison, Still more reasons why all HDMI cables are the same, CNET, October 29, 2012

  4. Nathan Spendelow and Katharine Byrne, Expensive HDMI cables make no difference and here’s why, Expert Reviews, January 13, 2020

  5. Clint DeBoer, Long HDMI Cables Bench Tests, Audioholics, July 8, 2008

  6. Marshall Guthrie, The Truth vs Hype about Expensive HDMI Cables, Audioholics, December 23, 2013

  7. Richard Leadbetter, Digital Foundry vs. HDMI video, Eurogamer, January 30, 2012

  8. Seth Porges, Brand-Name HDMI Cables: Are They Worth It?, Popular Mechanics, January 1, 2008

  9. Will Greenwald, Slaying the Cable Monster: What You Need to Know About HDMI Cables, PCMag, January 27, 2021

About your guide

Geoffrey Morrison
Sours: https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-hdmi-cables/

Me cable near buy displayport

Adapters for the Thunderbolt 3 or USB-C port on your Mac

Learn about different adapters for the Thunderbolt 3 or USB-C ports on your Mac.

The adapters and cables in this article work with these Mac computers:

  • Mac models introduced in 2016 or later with Thunderbolt 3 ports or Thunderbolt / USB 4 ports. These ports support both Thunderbolt 3 and USB-C connections.
  • Mac models introduced in 2015 or later with USB-C ports. These ports support USB-C connections.


  

To find the right cable or adapter for your Mac, check the connector on the end of the cable meant to plug into your computer.
  

 

Thunderbolt 3  Thunderbolt icon

If you're using a Thunderbolt 3 cable, such as the Apple Thunderbolt 3 Cable with your display or other device, it will connect to your Mac without an adapter.

The Apple Pro Display XDR and LG UltraFine 5K Display use Thunderbolt 3.

 

 

USB-C  USB icon

If you're using a USB-C cable, such as the mophie USB-C Cable with USB-C Connector with your device, it will connect to your Mac without an adapter. 

The LG UltraFine 4K Display uses USB-C.

 

Thunderbolt  Thunderbolt icon or Thunderbolt 2  Thunderbolt icon

If you're using a Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 cable with your Apple Thunderbolt Display or other device, use the Apple Thunderbolt 3 to Thunderbolt 2 Adapter. 

Thunderbolt and Thunderbolt 2 are not the same as Mini DisplayPort Mini DisplayPort icon. They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port.

 

Mini DisplayPort  Mini DisplayPort icon

If you're using a Mini DisplayPort cable with your display, use a USB-C to Mini DisplayPort cable, such as the mophie USB-C Cable with Mini DisplayPort Connector. Check with its manufacturer for compatibility with your Mac and display model.

Mini DisplayPort is not the same as Thunderbolt or Thunderbolt 2 Thunderbolt icon. They have the same shape, but use different symbols on the cable and port.

DisplayPort

If you're using a DisplayPort cable with your display, use a USB-C to DisplayPort adapter or cable.

 

DVI

If you're using a DVI cable with your display, use a USB-C to DVI adapter or cable. Check with its manufacturer for compatibility with your Mac and display model.

 

 

Information about products not manufactured by Apple, or independent websites not controlled or tested by Apple, is provided without recommendation or endorsement. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the selection, performance, or use of third-party websites or products. Apple makes no representations regarding third-party website accuracy or reliability. Contact the vendor for additional information.

Published Date: 

Sours: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT207443
Best Displayport Cables To Buy In 2021

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