Rocker and cab corner covers

Rocker and cab corner covers DEFAULT

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CostHack.com

Rocker panels and cab corners are structural elements that make up the body of your vehicle. Most people will never have to worry about these parts, much less replace them.

However, if you’re restoring an older vehicle or repairing collision or rust damage, you may need to know about the cost to replace rocker panels and cab corners. 

To replace all inner and outer rocker panels, it may cost anywhere from $ to $+, depending on the vehicle. The panel can cost anywhere from a few hundred dollars to $, plus the other materials and labor.

Replacing cab corners may cost between $$, depending on the amount of labor.

 Replacement For Chevy Silverado /GMC Sierra 4 Door Extended Cab Outer Rocker Panel And Cab Corner Pair

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Cost to Replace Rocker Panels

Rocker panels sometimes need to be replaced in older vehicles, as they may become damaged over time by rust and corrosion. In other cases, a collision may cause dents or bend the side panels of the vehicle. 

Either way, if you need to replace rocker panels, it can be a costly job. The parts themselves are not cheap and may vary somewhat based on the cost of metal.

Additionally, the rocker panel’s quality may increase or decrease your cost. 

To have your rocker panels replaced by a professional auto body shop or garage, you should plan to spend between $1, &#; $4,.

A big determinant for the total price is the amount of labor involved. Typically, the doors and other components need to be removed in order to replace the rocker panels, which can be a time consuming process.

In addition, the job requires welding, which may be an added expense.

Cost Estimates for Replacing Rocker Panels

Parts for Replacing Rocker Panels

Rocker panels can either be slip-on or full panels (which must be welded onto the vehicle). Slip-on panels go over the top of the present rocker versus removing and replacing the full rocker panels. 

The cost for the work as well as the quality and value are highly dependent on the quality of the panels used. Some slip-on rocker panels may be thinner and less durable than their full panel counterparts, which is something you should take into consideration. 

However, welded rocker panels also have the possibility of breaking off if the weld job is insufficient. 

Slip-on rocker panels are typically much less expensive than full rocker panels, both for the parts and installation. However, the make, model, and age of the vehicle will impact the price of either panel type. 

Rocker Cab Corner Repair Panel Kit for Sierra Silverado 4 Dr Extended Cab

The type of panels you go with really depends on how extensive the damage is. If your present rockers have sustained heavy damage or are excessively rusted, the structure may not be strong enough to go with slip-on panels.

In these cases, it’s usually a better choice to just cut the old panels out and weld in the new full rocker panels. 

However, if the fix is more cosmetic and your rocker panels just have minimal corrosion, slip-on replacement panels may be a good option. The installation cost will be much less and the turnaround time for the job will be shorter. 

Labor Cost to Replace Rocker Panels

Much of the cost for this job is the labor charge. It can be very time consuming to remove the doors and panels from a vehicle, cut away the old rocker panels, and do all the welding to install the new panels.

Some vehicles may even require removing carpet, seats, and other components to protect them from welding debris. 

On average, it may take about 8 hours for each side to replace the inner and outer rocker panels. This means 16 hours of labor for the rockers alone.

That doesn’t count any additional time required for prep work or doing cosmetic repairs afterward, like sanding and painting your new panels to match the rest of the vehicle. 

Most body shops charge between $$95 per hour, while dealerships typically charge up to $ per hour for labor

That means that to complete the rocker replacement at 8 hours per side, you would potentially be looking at a minimum of $$ for labor at an independent body shop. 

Labor Cost for Rocker Panel Replacement 

Cost to Replace Your Own Rocker Panels

Some people choose to do their own rocker panel replacement, especially people who are rebuilding or restoring older vehicles. It’s possible to do this job yourself as long as you have the right tools and equipment. 

In addition to the rocker panels themselves, here are some basic tools you should have for the job: 

  • Angle grinder ($40 &#; $)
  • Wire brush ($15 &#; $40)
  • Welding machine ($ &#; $3,+)
  • Rust inhibitor spray ($8 &#; $15)

To install slip-on rocker panels, you should also have these basic tools: 

  • Pry bar ($10 &#; $25)
  • Hammer ($6 &#; $30)
  • Electric or pneumatic drill ($40 &#; $+)
  • Fasteners or adhesive ($10 &#; $30)

These prices don’t include primer, paint, cleaning products, and any other common materials that you may need.

However, knowing the cost estimates helps you to understand what kinds of things you may be charged for even if you have the work done professionally. 

Cost to Replace Cab Corners 

Replacing the cab corners in a truck is a pretty big job, as it requires removing parts of the vehicle, cutting away the parts to be replaced, and welding the new cab corners on.

The parts for the job are not very expensive, but it is a labor intensive project. 

Once the cab corners are replaced, the new areas will need to be painted, which will also increase the cost. Painting a vehicle requires sanding and priming, along with multiple coats of paint.

This requires time, materials, and space in the garage, which you’ll have to pay for. 

Replacing cab corners typically costs between $ and $2, Many people report spending around $1, for this repair. 

The type of vehicle that you have, including the make, model, and year, will all influence the bottom line cost for the work.

The cab corners themselves are relatively inexpensive and can be purchased for $ or less, but the body work and labor costs are what make the job so pricey. 

Average Cost for Cab Corner Replacement

Cab corners are fairly inexpensive themselves, but they are much more costly to install. According to Carparts.com, most cab corners cost between $10 and $Parts Cost for Replacing Cab Corners

Of course this amount can vary based on the material and quality of the cab corners and your vehicle specifications. 

Cab corners may be made from metal alloys or stainless steel. Both types are susceptible to rust damage, holes, or physical damage from collisions or road debris that flies up off the ground. 

Small areas of minimal damage may be repaired by removing rust and corrosion, sanding the area down, and applying a patch panel. However, severe damage, excessive rust, or broken cab corners need to be replaced. 

Labor Cost for Replacing Cab Corners

The bulk of the expense for replacing cab corners is due to the labor involved. Typically, the bed box must be removed to do the job right. This is a process all on its own and will add some time to your labor cost. 

The service technician will then cut out the damaged cab corners and grind down any additional rust and corrosion. 

Any paint also has to be sanded off and the metal needs to be sanded down for a good weld. The tech will then carefully weld the new pieces onto the vehicle, sand everything down, and prime and paint as needed. 

On average, you should expect to pay around $$85 per hour for labor when you take your car to the body shop.

Estimated Labor Cost for Cab Corner Replacement

Replacing Rocker Panels and Cab Corners 

Because the process is similar for both jobs, many people opt to have their rocker panels and cab corners replaced at the same time.

Doing both jobs together can help save on labor costs and make it easier to match paint and fix multiple rust damaged areas at once. 

Some vehicles need more extensive labor to prepare for the replacement, especially some older model trucks. For example, one shop quoted $ for a Chevrolet truck, with part of the labor cost going toward removing the gas tank from the vehicle. 

To replace both the rocker panels and cab corners, it typically costs between $1, and $4, Most people pay around $ for a basic replacement using good quality parts.

To do both of these replacements, the truck must be largely disassembled, which takes a lot of time and manpower. Once the job is done, the vehicle must be reassembled, detailed, and any stripped or lost nuts, bolts, and seals must be replaced.

Sometimes, glass repairs or electrical wiring repairs must also be done to get the vehicle back to normal working order. 

All these details may increase the total cost for the job. The amount of cosmetic body work (like paint, scratch and chip repairs, etc.) can also significantly increase the total.  

Other Things to Consider

Oftentimes, people replace their rocker panels and cab corners due to rust damage. However, it’s important to remember that most shops do not guarantee their work against further rust.

Rust removal is almost never guaranteed, as there’s no way to know how much additional rust is present once the surface layer is removed. 

You should consider whether replacing or repairing damage to your rocker panels and cab corners is due to cosmetic preferences or structural damage that may impact the integrity of the vehicle. 

Minor cosmetic damage may not be worth the high cost for replacing these components, while severe damage or breakage may be more essential. 

One way that you can combat the issue of recurring rust is to treat the area with anti-rust products. 

Another consideration is the possibility of inconsistency between the existing body and the new replacement parts, either in color or alignment. When new components are welded onto the vehicle, they very rarely match perfectly. 

Having a skilled, reputable professional do the work can help to minimize the visibility of these inconsistencies and help you get more value from the repair cost.

It may be possible to patch or repair damage to a small area, but this process typically still requires welding.

Unless you have a welding machine and are able to do the work yourself, the cost to have a professional do the repair is usually not worth it when compared to the cost to replace it altogether. 

The Bottom Line on the Cost to Replace Rocker Panels and Cab Corners

Replacing rocker panels and cab corners can be an expensive repair job for your vehicle, but it may be worth it for damage to the structural frame. Repairing some holes and rust damage can also help improve the resale value of the truck. 

Most people should expect to pay between $ and $ to replace their rocker panels and cab corners. The cost may be reduced by only replacing one or the other, but both jobs are very labor intensive, so it often makes sense to do both at the same time. 

The best thing to do is shop around and get multiple estimates. Some body shops may match labor costs from their competitors if you have a written estimate.

Ultimately, it’s up to each person to weigh the cost and benefits for doing this type of work to their vehicle and make the best decision for their specific situation. 

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Slip-On vs. Welding Rocker Panels

Slip-On vs. Welding Rocker Panel Replacement

The rocker panels on your truck take a beating, from daily use and from the elements. Rocker panels are some of the most vital components of a truck’s body and we want our rocker panels to remain in solid, rust-free shape throughout ownership. Unfortunately, rocker panels are also some of the more vulnerable parts of a vehicle. Rusted out rocker panels can expose your vehicles frame rails, which can accelerate rust in this area.

Rocker panel replacements come in two styles, slip-on and full rocker panels. Slip-on rocker panels go overtop of an existing rocker, where full rocker panels are meant to be an exact replacement. There are pros and cons to both and choosing the right panel for your needs and capabilities is important if you are going to take on the job of replacing them yourself.

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Longevity of Panel Repair

Strength of Panels

When it comes to replacements, the value of the repair work will largely depend on the quality of the panels. Can the slip-on panels withstand an ongoing stream of rain and road salt exposure, or will they rapidly succumb to the rusting issues that consumed the older rocker panels? And can they handle day-to-day wear and tear?

Durability and strength of rocker panels

What matters most when it comes to the durability is the quality of the repair job and the thickness and strength of a given set of slip-on or full rocker panels. At Raybuck, all of our panels are made out of quality gauged steel. Full rocker panels can offer a stronger, more permanent solution, but only if you have the skill and experience with a welder. A poorly applied welded rocker will be much weaker than a carefully applied slip-on.

Security of Installation

As mentioned above, how successful the job is primarily depends on the quality of the work done. If a slip-on panel is insufficiently fastened to the vehicle, screws or rivets could possibly pop out when the truck bends and twists during normal use. Likewise, a full rocker panel that was welded on could tear loose at the edges if the welding work is thin or inconsistent, or if the metal was warped during the process.

Either panel type could be strong or weak depending on how it is installed. However, slip on panels are naturally more prone to coming loose— especially on trucks that are driven on rougher roads or terrain.

Rust Resistance of Surfaces

The whole purpose of buying and installing a new set of rocker panels is to rid your vehicle of a hopelessly damaged or rusted body panels. However, if the new panels also rust within the next few years, the money and work that went into the installation process will amount to little in the end.

In order to reap the full benefits of rocker panel rust repair, you shouldn’t leave your new panels vulnerable to the same corrosive elements. Whether you get welded or slip-on panels, the surfaces should be periodically treated with an anti-rust formula. Better yet, recoat the undersides annually to ward off the impact of water and salt.

Using the correct methods of application will also extend the life. For example, if aluminum rivets are used instead of steel you will see rust much sooner.

Resale Value

New rockers enhance resale value

Though not directly related to the longevity, welded or slip-on paneling can nonetheless affect the resale value of a truck. This could be a good or bad thing, depending on the quality of the installation. If the new panels are seamlessly installed and well-maintained, they could possibly enhance the resale value.

But if a pair of full rocker panels have been poorly welded, it could lower the vehicle&#;s value.

If you wish to get new panels for functionality, but do not intend to ever sell the vehicle, you might not need an aesthetically perfect installation — just a secure one. However, if you do intend to sell the vehicle at some point, you will want to make sure the new panels blend in with the rest of the truck’s body. In this case you may want to consider using a full rocker panel, assuming you have the welding capabilities.

The Appearance of Replacement Work

Rust–Free Panels

Rust rot diminishes the appearance of a vehicle and can shorten its useful life. Rust will keep spreading along surfaces unless it is caught early, sanded out, and treated with a rust inhibitor to prevent the rust from returning. Whether you drive a jeep or a Ford Super Duty, rusted or rotted out panels need to be removed and replaced if they have become overrun with rust.

Both slip-on and full rocker panels are a viable solution for getting your truck back to like new conditions. Slip-on rocker panels will allow you to replace only the rotted portions or sections of the rocker panel, whereas with a full rocker panel you will be replacing the entire panel. With either of these options, the most important factor is to make sure all of the rusted metal from the previous panel has been removed.

Weld Marks

On trucks, jeeps and other vehicles with full rocker panels, you may sometimes notice bumps along the seams where the panels are joined to the vehicle. These can be prevented by using tack welds to set the piece in place before fully welding it on and using an angle grinders to even out any unevenness.

Without a significant amount of welding experience, the average home mechanic may not be able to smooth out the seams of a welded panel to factory perfection, but by following these best practices you can come close. An actual piece-perfect welding job could run into the four-figure range. Therefore, slight bits of inconsistency should be expected if you do decide to weld full rocker panels to your Dodge Ram or Chevy Truck.

Rivets/Screws/Adhesive

On vehicles with slip-on rocker panels, metal fasteners and/or adhesive glues are generally used to hold the panels into place. While some jeep and truck owners make do with only adhesive applications, most people prefer the more solid and proven means of using adhesive and screws or rivets to hold panels into place.

Use adhesive and screws or rivets

This does mean that fastener heads may be noticeable along the top edges of the rocker panels. However, a body filler can be used to make these less noticeable if desired. Moreover, opinions vary regarding the look of screw and rivet heads. You might even say they add character to a vehicle&#;s exterior.

Inconsistency

When new panels are installed on an old vehicle, there will often be some inconsistency between the new replacement part and the preexisting body. Whether there is a slight difference in color or a noticeable gap in the age of the part, it&#;s rare for a new panel to blend in seamlessly with an old auto body. These inconsistencies will be much less likely to show if care is taken in the replacing of the panel.

Slip-on rocker panels may show more inconsistencies than full rocker panels because slip-ons go over the preexisting panel, they do not replace it the way a full rocker panel does.

Tools and Knowledge Required for Rocker Panel Installation

Welding Full Rocker Panels

Full rocker panels will completely replace that area of your vehicle. The old panel will need to be cut out and the new panel welded in its place. As with any welding project, the installation of full rocker panels requires at least a moderate level of skill. Even application of heat is needed for an even weld seam that will effectively fasten the panel without weakening the metal by making it too thin. Avoid making long welding beads as this could warp the thin metal.

You should have some experience with an MIG welder – or a similar portable welder &#; before attempting this kind of repair project. The more skill and experience you have, the better the finished result will be. If you are new to welding, doing practice welds on scrap metal may be helpful before working on your vehicle.

Fastening Slip-On Rocker Panels

Slip-on rocker panels are an alternative to full welded panels. Slip-on rockers literally go overtop of the existing rocker panel. They are designed to follow the same contours of the original, but are slightly oversized so that they fit overtop. Fastening slip-on rocker panels with screws,rivets and/or adhesives may be a better alternative for you if you do not have welding experience or do not have access to a welder. To successfully install a slip-on rocker panel it is crucial that the rocker panel be accurately fitted to replace the rotted portion that was removed. Also ensure that the holes for the fasteners line up without shifting the new slip on panel out of place.

While they may not require welding, slip-on rocker panels come with their own challenges. Depending on your skill set and available resources you will have to decide which method will work best for you.

Cutting Away Old Panels

Remove old rusted metal

Before you replace a rocker panel with a new full or slip-on panel, you must cut away and remove the old, rusted panel. When you remove the old rusted metal, it is important to sand several inches beyond the rusted edges using an angle grinder or similar tool. If not enough material is taken the new panel may rust prematurely, however you should not cut or grind away more metal than necessary.

Both installations – full and slip-on &#; will require you to cut away and sand the rusted, old panel for best results. You may be tempted to simply cover the rust with a slip-on panel, but you will experience rust much sooner on the replacement panel this way than if you remove all of the rust first.

Measuring and Adjusting

Replacement rocker panels need to be properly measured and cut before the welding or fastening of the new panel takes place. This will determine how well the new rocker panel fits in place.

For slip-on panels, holes must be measured and marked, drilled, and their edges smoothed out prior to fasteners being applied. For full rocker panels, accurately measuring and cutting will make for more even (and less noticeable) weld seams.

Repair Difficulty of Slip-On vs. Welded Rocker Panels

Rusting Surfaces

Unless rust is caught early and removed and treated you will likely have to replace the rocker panels on your truck and some point to restore it to like new condition. The likelihood of rust returning to this area of your workhorse will depend on how much care you take during the removal of the old rocker panel and the installation of the new.

Rust needs to be completely removed from the area of the truck before the replacement panel is installed and treated with a rust inhibitor. This will involve the careful use of a grinder and a wire brush to effectively remove all of the rust.

Treating the underside of your vehicle regularly with anti-rusting formulas, especially if you live in an area that sees a lot of heavy snow or rainfall, will help keep rust at bay. Any early rust formation should be scraped off and treated with a rust inhibitor before it becomes a larger issue that will require a body panel to be replaced.

Strength of Application

The durability of your repair job will depend on your skill and how carefully you complete each step of application, regardless of whether you are using slip-on or full rocker panels.

A poorly welded full rocker panel may have weaknesses in the welded seams that could cause them to fail. For example, if the welding beads you made were too long you may have warped the thin metal of the panel. Slip-on panels could have similar issues if the panel was not cut accurately or the correct type of fasteners were not used, or they were not correctly applied. The combination of poor cutting and alignment of the new panel and the incorrect use of the fasteners could cause them to pop out

The Cost of Different Rocker Panel Types

Slip-On Rocker Panels

The least expensive rocker panels are generally of the slip-on variety, which are available for various makes and models of trucks and jeeps. Slip-on panels can either be installed in front of or in place of older, rusted panels, though it&#;s generally best to remove the worst parts of an older panel before installing the replacement.

Prices vary, but a set of rocker panels typically cost anywhere between $ and $ dollars depending on the vehicle you are restoring and where you purchase the replacement panels.

Full Rocker Panels

Full rocker panels typically cost more than the slip-on version, in part because require more material to manufacture as they are completely replacing the old panel.

As with slip-on panels, the price for a full rocker set could depend on the model or age of a given truck and the vendor. Full rocker panel sets generally cost $ to $

Professional Installation

A professional rocker panel replacement from a body repair shop can run anywhere from $1, to $4, or more. Part of the reason is the additional work required for neat, clean installations, such as the removal of truck doors. If you opt to replace the panels yourself, you can opt out of these measures and the only cost will be the parts, tools and your time.

Replacement Rocker Panels from Raybuck Auto Body Parts

Your truck is as tough as the work it does, but the rocker panels on your work horse take a beating day in and day out on demanding roads and rough terrain. Even with proper preventative care your rocker panels will most likely need to be replaced at some point to extend the life of your vehicle. Raybuck Auto Body Parts, we sell replacement rocker panels for a variety of vehicles manufactured since the s. Whether you’re restoring a classic pickup or repairing your work horse or weekend warrior we have the rust repair panels you need to get the job done.

With panels designed for Dodge Rams, Chevy trucks and the Ford Super Duty trucks among the variety in our inventory, we have suitable rocker panels for practically any truck or jeep. Check out our inventory and feel free to contact our knowledgeable sales reps with any questions you may have!

Sours: https://raybuck.com/slip-on-vs-welding-rocker-panels/
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