Colorado springs election results 2017

Colorado springs election results 2017 DEFAULT

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The following links provide results, results by precinct and campaign finance filings for elections back to 1995.

Election History Table
Election DateDescriptionResultsResults by PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/6/2021April 6 General Municipal Election ResultsBy Precinct Campaign Finance
11/5/2019November 5, 2019 Special ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/2/2019April 2, 2019 General Municipal ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/7/2017November 7, 2017 Special Municipal ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/4/2017April 4, 2017 General Municipal ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/3/2015November 3, 2015 Special Municipal ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
5/19/2015May 19, 2015 Mayoral Run-Off ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/7/2015April 7, 2015 General Municipal ElectionResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/2/2013April 2, 2013 General MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
8/28/2012August 28, 2012 Special MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/1/2011November 1, 2011 CoordinatedResultsBy Precinct
5/17/2011May 17, 2011 Mayoral RunoffResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/5/2011April 5, 2011 General MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/2/2010November 2, 2010 GeneralResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/3/2009November 3, 2009 CoordinatedResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/7/2009April 7, 2009 General MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/4/2008November 4, 2008 GeneralResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/3/2007April 3, 2007 General MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/7/2006November 7, 2006 GeneralResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
11/7/2006November 7, 2006 Downtown Development Authority (DDA)Results
11/7/2006November 7, 2006 Marketplace at Austin Bluffs
General Improvement District (MAB GID)
Results
4/5/2005April 5, 2005 General MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/1/2003April 1, 2003 General MunicipalResultsBy PrecinctCampaign Finance
4/3/2001April 3, 2001 General MunicipalResultsBy Precinct
4/6/1999April 6, 1999 General MunicipalResultsBy Precinct
4/1/1997April 1, 1997 General MunicipalResultsBy Precinct
4/4/1995April 4, 1995 General MunicipalResultsBy Precinct
Sours: https://coloradosprings.gov/city-clerk/page/election-history

This page is an overview of Ballotpedia's coverage of the 2017 Colorado elections, including a list of offices up for election, links to election results, state election dates and deadlines, an option to look up your candidates by address, as well as an FAQ section. Click on the tabs below to navigate.

<< Colorado elections, 2016 | Colorado elections, 2018 >>

Who is running for election in Colorado?

Enter your address into the sample ballot lookup tool to see the candidates Ballotpedia is covering in your upcoming elections.

Offices on the ballot

Below is a list of 2017 Colorado elections covered by Ballotpedia. Follow the links to learn more about each type.

Legend: ✓ election(s) / — no elections
Subject to Ballotpedia's scope

Election dates

Colorado election dates, 2017

Statewide election dates in Colorado are listed below. For more dates, please see Ballotpedia:Calendar.

Statewide election dates

August 7, 2017: Ballot measure signature deadline

Polling hours: 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.[1]

Local election dates

Ballotpedia covers municipal elections in the most-populated counties in the country, school board elections for the top 1,000 districts by enrollment, and local courts down to the county level.

April 4, 2017:
Colorado Springs (General)
November 7, 2017:
Academy School District 20 (General)
Aurora Public Schools (Adams-Arapahoe 28J) (General)
Boulder Valley School District (General)
School District 27J (General)
Cherry Creek School District (General)
Colorado Springs School District 11 (General)
Denver Public Schools (General)
Douglas County School District RE-1 (General)
Falcon School District 49 (General)
Poudre School District R-1 (General)
Mesa County Valley School District 51 (General)
Greeley-Evans School District 6 (General)
Harrison School District Two (General)
Jeffco Public Schools (General)
Littleton Public Schools (General)
St. Vrain Valley School District (General)
Thompson School District R-2J (General)
Pueblo City Schools (General)
Pueblo School District 70 (General)
Widefield School District 3 (General)
Adams 12 Five Star Schools (General)
Westminster Public Schools (General)

Lookup these districts in Ballotpedia's sample ballot lookup tool for more information about the candidates.

Frequently asked questions

When do the polls open and close?

7 a.m. to 7 p.m.[2]
See State Poll Opening and Closing Times (2017) for more information

Where can I find election results?

Results for each election are posted on Ballotpedia's election overview pages, as well as the relevant candidate pages. You can find links to the current election overview pages in the "Offices on the ballot" tab.

How do primaries work in Colorado?

A primary election is an election in which registered voters select a candidate that they believe should be a political party's candidate for elected office to run in the general election. They are also used to choose convention delegates and party leaders. Primaries are state-level and local-level elections that take place prior to a general election. Colorado utilizes a semi-closed primary system. According to Section 1-7-201 of the Colorado Revised Statutes, "an eligible unaffiliated elector is entitled to vote in the primary election of a major political party without affiliating with that political party."[3][4][5][6]

How do I register to vote?

See Voting in Colorado - Voter registration.

Is there an early voting period?

See Voting in Colorado - Early voting.

Who is eligible for absentee voting?

See Voting in Colorado - Absentee voting.

What are the voter ID laws in Colorado?

See Voter identification laws by state.

How do I file to run for office?

See Ballot access requirements for political candidates in Colorado for information on how to run for state or federal office.

What does Ballotpedia cover?

Ballotpedia's coverage extends to all elections on the federal level, all gubernatorial, state legislative, statewide ballot measure, and statewide judicial elections, as well as many other types of state executive offices. Local election coverage includes comprehensive ballot coverage for municipal and judicial elections in the top 100 cities by population and races for the large counties that overlap them. In the state capitals outside of the 100 largest cities, it includes coverage of mayoral, city council, and district attorney elections. It also includes school board elections in the top 200 largest school districts by enrollment, all California local ballot measures, and notable local ballot measures from across the nation. Ballotpedia also covers all elections in the U.S. territories but not elections in other countries.

How do I contact Ballotpedia with a question?

Email us at [email protected]

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Footnotes:

  1. Colorado Revised Statutes, "1-7-101," accessed January 4, 2016
  2. Colorado Revised Statutes, "1-7-101," accessed January 4, 2016
  3. National Conference of State Legislatures, "State Primary Election Types," accessed October 25, 2019
  4. FairVote, "Primaries," accessed October 25, 2019
  5. Ballotpedia research conducted December 26, 2013, through January 3, 2014, researching and analyzing various state websites and codes.
  6. Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, "Primary Elections FAQs," accessed October 25, 2019
Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Colorado_elections,_2017
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General

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2019

2015

2017 Colorado Springs elections
Ballotpedia Election Coverage Badge.png
Election dates
Filing deadline: January 23, 2017
Primary election: None
General election: April 4, 2017
Election stats
Offices up: City council
Total seats up: 6
Election type: Nonpartisan
Other municipal elections
U.S. municipal elections, 2017

The city of Colorado Springs, Colorado, held elections for Districts 1 through 6 on the city council on April 4, 2017. The incumbents of Districts 1, 4, 5, and 6 each ran for re-election. District 4 incumbent Helen Collins was defeated by Yolanda Avila. The other incumbents—Don Knight, Jill Gaebler, and Andy Pico—were re-elected to new terms.

The council members representing Districts 2 and 3 did not file for re-election, which resulted in openAn open seat or election is one in which the incumbent officeholder does not seek re-election. races for those races. David Geislinger ran unopposed for District 2, and Richard Skorman defeated Chuck Fowler in the District 3 race. The filing deadline for candidates who wished to run in this election was January 23, 2017. There were also three ballot measures on the ballot in April.[1]

On November 7, 2017, there were three more measures on the ballot. A city measure sought approval to begin collecting stormwater fees. The Colorado Springs School District 11measure was for a $42 million property tax increase. El Paso county residents voted on a measure about allowing the county to retain and spend $14.5 million in excess 2016 revenue.[2]

Elections

Results

Colorado Springs City Council, District 1 General Election, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngDon KnightIncumbent66.82%10,360
Greg Basham33.18%5,144
Total Votes15,504
Source:Colorado Springs, Colorado, "April 4, 2017 Municipal Election Results," accessed April 18, 2017

Colorado Springs City Council, District 3 General Election, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngRichard Skorman57.79%9,077
Chuck Fowler42.21%6,629
Total Votes15,706
Source:Colorado Springs, Colorado, "April 4, 2017 Municipal Election Results," accessed April 18, 2017

Colorado Springs City Council, District 4 General Election, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngYolanda Avila40.79%2,346
Deborah Hendrix31.04%1,785
Helen CollinsIncumbent28.17%1,620
Total Votes5,751
Source:Colorado Springs, Colorado, "April 4, 2017 Municipal Election Results," accessed April 18, 2017

Colorado Springs City Council, District 5 General Election, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngJill GaeblerIncumbent66.34%9,591
Lynette Crow-Iverson33.66%4,866
Total Votes14,457
Source:Colorado Springs, Colorado, "April 4, 2017 Municipal Election Results," accessed April 18, 2017

Colorado Springs City Council, District 6 General Election, 2017
CandidateVote %Votes
Green check mark transparent.pngAndy PicoIncumbent52.14%5,090
Melanie Bernhardt18.57%1,813
Janak Joshi16.33%1,594
Robert Burns12.96%1,265
Total Votes9,762
Source:Colorado Springs, Colorado, "April 4, 2017 Municipal Election Results," accessed April 18, 2017

November 7, 2017

Ballot Question 2A: Colorado Springs Stormwater Fees Approveda

A yes vote was a vote in favor of the city collecting stormwater fees in the amount of $5 per month for residential households and $30 per acre per month for non-residential properties.
A no vote was a vote against the city collecting stormwater fees in the amount of $5 per month for residential households and $30 per acre per month for non-residential properties.
Ballot Question 3E: Colorado Springs School District 11 Tax Levy Approveda
A yes vote was a vote in favor of increasing the property taxes within the school district by $42 million.
A no vote was a vote against increasing the property taxes within the school district by $42 million.
Ballot Question 1A: El Paso County Revenue Retention Tabor Override Approveda
A yes vote was a vote in favor of allowing the county to retain and spend $14.5 million in excess 2016 revenue.
A no vote was a vote against allowing the county to retain and spend $14.5 million in excess 2016 revenue.

April 4, 2017

Issue 1: Colorado Springs Sale of City Utilities Approveda

A yes vote was a vote in favor of changing the city charter to require a 60 percent approval from voters, instead of a 50 percent approval from voters, in order for the city to sell all or any substantial part of the city's utilities, including the water system, wastewater system, electric light and power system, and gas system.
A no vote was a vote against changing the city charter rule that says that the city needs only a 50 percent approval from voters in order to sell all or any part of the city's utilities, including the water system, wastewater system, electric light and power system, and gas system.
Issue 2: Colorado Springs Excess Revenue for Stormwater Projects Approveda
A yes vote was a vote in favor of allowing the city to keep $6 million of revenue from fiscal year 2016, as well as a like amount from fiscal year 2017's revenue, to be used for stormwater projects.
A no vote was a vote against allowing the city to keep $6 million of revenue from fiscal year 2016, as well as a like amount from fiscal year 2017's revenue, to be used for stormwater projects.
Issue 3: Colorado Springs Exemption from State Broadband Law Approveda
A yes vote was a vote in favor of allowing the city to exempt itself from Senate Bill 152 so that it can provide, facilitate, partner or coordinate with service providers for high-speed internet service, cable television service and telecommunication service.
A no vote was a vote against allowing the city to exempt itself from Senate Bill 152 so that it can provide, facilitate, partner or coordinate with service providers for high-speed internet service, cable television service and telecommunication service.

The tables below show the amount of contributions and expenditures for each candidate's campaign. The reports included are from the reporting period that ended on March 15, 2017.[3][4]

About the city

See also: Colorado Springs, Colorado

Colorado Springs is a city in El Paso County, Colorado. As of 2013, its population was 439,886.[5]

City government

See also: Mayor-council government

The city of Colorado Springs uses a strong mayor and city council system. In this form of municipal government, the city council serves as the city's primary legislative body while the mayor serves as the city's chief executive.[6]

Demographics

The following table displays demographic data provided by the United States Census Bureau.

Demographic data for Colorado Springs, Colorado (2015)
 Colorado SpringsColorado
Total population:442,0405,448,819
Land area (square miles):195103,642
Race and ethnicity[7]
White:79.2%84.2%
Black/African American:6.1%4%
Asian:3.1%2.9%
Native American:0.6%0.9%
Pacific Islander:0.3%0.1%
Two or more:5.1%3.5%
Hispanic/Latino:17.2%21.1%
Education
High school graduation rate:93.1%90.7%
College graduation rate:37.2%38.1%
Income
Median household income:$54,527$60,629
Persons below poverty level:13.4%13.5%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, "American Community Survey" (5-year estimates 2010-2015)

Recent news

The link below is to the most recent stories in a Google news search for the terms Colorado Springs Colorado election. These results are automatically generated from Google. Ballotpedia does not curate or endorse these articles.

See also

External links

  1. Colorado Springs, Colorado, "Election Candidate FAQ," accessed January 24, 2017
  2. Colorado Springs Independent, "The ballot is full of funding requests. But what happens if voters say “No”?" October 11, 2017
  3. The Gazette, "New campaign finance reports show Skorman and Crow-Iverson leading in cash raised," March 20, 2017
  4. Colorado Springs, Colorado, "Campaign Finance Reports and Data," accessed March 30, 2017
  5. U.S. Census Bureau, "State and County Quick Facts," accessed October 22, 2014
  6. Springs Gov, "Your Leadership," accessed October 22, 2014
  7. Note: Percentages for race and ethnicity may add up to more than 100 percent because respondents may report more than one race and the Hispanic/Latino ethnicity may be selected in conjunction with any race. Read more about race and ethnicity in the census here.
Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Municipal_elections_in_Colorado_Springs,_Colorado_(2017)
Election results prompt forward thinking in Colorado

Three new faces will sit on Colorado Springs City Council later this month.

While two current council members, Don Knight and Jill Gaebler, could not run again due to term limits, incumbent David Geislinger in City Council District 2 was defeated, according to final unofficial results posted Wednesday.

Here's who won each district, as of the final unofficial ballot count posted on Wednesday, April 7:

  • District 1: Dave Donelson - 48.01%
  • District 2: Randy Helms - 37.5%
  • District 3: Richard Skorman (Incumbent) - 59.53%
  • District 4: Yolanda Avila (I) - 61.5%
  • District 5: Nancy Henjum - 37.06%
  • District 6: Mike O'Malley (I) - 61.49%

All candidates run without a political party affiliation in Colorado Springs’ nonpartisan city elections.

This is the first electoral victory for Mike O'Malley, who was appointed to his seat earlier in January when Andy Pico won his bid for the statehouse.

In the KRCC/CPR Voter Guide, Donelson, a former Green Beret, said he wanted to prioritize public safety, infrastructure and small businesses.

For Henjum, a long-time resident of Colorado Springs and a leadership consultant, the city is at a "critical juncture." She sees her priorities through the lens of growth. She identified supporting local and small businesses through post-pandemic recovery, strengthening neighborhoods, and investing in parks and open spaces as priorities.

Helms, a graduate of the U.S. Air Force Academy, said roads and infrastructure are his top priorities.

Council members will be sworn in during a special meeting set for April 20, at which time the council president and president pro tem will also be elected.

Voters across the city also decided to remove a word-count limit on titles for future tax measures. Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers praised the result, saying in a statement that it "will make it easier for local government to provide complete information on the ballot and help voters make a more informed choice."

All results are unofficial until they are certified. Official results are expected on April 19.

According to final results, 83,404 ballots had been cast in this latest municipal election; a voter turnout of just over 26.8 percent. That is a decline from previous years.

Colorado Springs’ last April municipal election took place in 2019, with a 37 percent turnout. That election was for mayor as well as at-large members of city council. The last April election for district seats was in 2017, with nearly 32 percent turnout.

Editor's Note: This story was updated from its original form to indicate final unofficial results.

Sours: https://www.cpr.org/2021/04/07/2021-city-council-election-results-colorado-springs-voters-favor-a-focus-on-infrastructure-and-small-business/

2017 colorado results springs election

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