Adding a texture in blender

Adding a texture in blender DEFAULT

Creating and Applying a Texture to a Mesh

Get to the Point

  1. UV unwrap the object
  2. In the Image Editor panel, click UV and select Export UV Layout. Name the file and save it.
  3. Open the UV export in your favorite image editor like GIMP or Photoshop
  4. Paint the texture onto the UV and save it
  5. In Blender, with the mesh selected, apply a new Material
  6. Open up the shader editor
  7. Shift+A to add a node and select Texture > Image Texture
  8. In the Image Texture node, click Open and navigate to the saved painted texture
  9. Connect the yellow Color output from the Image Texture node to the Base Color input on the Principled Shader node by clicking and dragging from one to the other


The Details

Adding an eye-catching material and texture to a 3D object is arguably the most important part of the 3D process. A well-made texture helps to sell the realism of an object in a photorealistic scene or helps to create a specific feeling or visual theme if the setting is more stylized.

Export and Paint the UV

To get started adding a texture, you first need to UV unwrap the mesh. In the Image Editor panel (it should be showing the UV of your mesh) click UV and select Export UV Layout.

From the file selector, choose where you would like to save the exported file and name it. In this window, there is also an option to change the file type as well as the size. The size is important to keep in mind based on the type of texture you will be creating. Higher resolutions work better for more realistic textures. Once the image is saved, open it up in your favorite image editor like GIMP or Photoshop. Painting textures could be a whole tutorial (or twelve) on its own, so we won’t go into detail on that here. Use the image editor to paint the new texture, using the UV layout as a guide. Below is a before/after example of the basic exported UV (left) compared to the finished painted texture (right).

Applying the Texture

Save the painted texture and return to Blender. With your mesh selected, click the Material Properties panel on the right and click the New button to add a new material. Open up the Shader Editor in one of your Blender panels.

Learn more about how to manage Blender workspace panels and create your own UI layout.

In the Shader Editor, press Shift+A to add a node and select Texture > Image Texture from the popup. Click “Open” to add a texture, navigate to your painted texture file and open it. When you add a new material to an object, by default Blender uses a Principled BSDF shader node for the material. To add your texture to the Principled node, simply click the yellow output dot next to “Color” on the Image Texture node and drag it to the yellow input dot next to Base Color on the Principled node. To see the texture in the viewport, switch to Shaded or Rendered view mode:

Full setup:


Comments

Sours: https://twominutetuts.com/tutorial/creating-and-applying-a-texture-to-an-mesh/
texture in blender
sample texture in blender

In this tutorial you will learn how to add a texture in Blender using Cycles render.

Step 1

Using the texture you have made or imported change the default screen layout to compositing for a detailed result.

changing layout to compositing 

Step 2 

Change blender render to cycles render at the top of the screen.

Blender Render
Cycles Render

Step 3

Right click in the plane, click on the material button on the top right corner of the screen, click new.

adding a material

Step 4

If a material is already in place use the subtract button then press new.

subtracting the existing material 

Step 5

Click on the dot right of the white colour.


Step 6


Select image texture, press open and navigate to the image you want to use, once selected open the image/texture.
opening a image texture

Step 7

To map the image on the plane go to edit mode by pressing Tab or changing it from the bar menu.

changing to edit mode

Step 8

Press A to deselect then A again to select everything. go to mesh, UV unwrap, unwrap.

unwrapping the cube

Step 9

On the left side the plane will be unwrapped. Next load the image.

applying the image onto the cube

Step 10 

Switch back to object mode, switch back to the default layout, go to render to see the result.


changing to rendered view

Rendered result 

Sours: https://www.onlinedesignteacher.com/2015/03/how-to-add-texture-in-blender_11.html
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How to add a texture to an object in Blender

In this article I explain how to use textures in Blender in the simplest way I can. I also want to expand on just adding a texture so that you can do simple adjustments when needed.

How to add a texture in Blender? Go to the shading tab, drag and drop an image texture into the lower portion of the interface. Click and drag the yellow dot on the new image texture node and drop it on the yellow dot named "Base color" in the "Principled BSDF" node. We can now see the texture on the default cube.

In most cases, this is what we need to add a texture to an object and see it:

  • An object
  • An image texture
  • A material
  • A UV Map
  • Correct view mode

In the rest of this article, we will take a close look at how this all works using image textures and how we can change how the texture gets mapped to the cube. We will also widen what we know about different kinds of textures, other mapping methods and get into some basics of materials.

But if you don't have a material to add in the first place, the Extreme PBR Evo add-on is a great place to start. It also help you to easily bring in and adjust materials.

External content: Blendermarket, Extreme PBR Evo 1100+ materials

But let's now get on with how we can add a texture to our objects in Blender.

The problem with adding textures

In the introduction we started with a very simple example. Under the hood though, much is already setup for us. However, there are many questions that we haven't yet asked or answered.

How do we know that we add the texture to the cube? What if we have multiple objects, how do we know what object the texture is applied to?

Why is the texture rotated the way it is and why is only part of the texture applied to each side?

Essentially, we need a way to make a connection between the texture and the object. In the introduction example this is already setup for us as part of the default scene.

There are two components between the object and the texture. A material and some way of mapping the texture to the object.

To make things a bit more complicated, there are also different view modes and render engines in Blender. We will not go in-depth into this here, but we need to make sure that we distinguish between modes where we can view textures and where we cannot.

Two kinds of textures

When working with 3D we come across two kinds of textures. These are:

  • Procedural textures
  • Image textures

We already touched on image textures in the introduction. These are textures made up of an image. It can be any photo or image made in a 2D image application like photoshop.

There are also more specific tools dedicated to creating textures. These programs can generally output image textures that we can plug into Blender.

A procedural texture is a mathematical operation that creates some kind of pattern. Often a black and white pattern or with very elaborate colors. Some examples of procedural textures are gradients, different kinds of noises and voronoi patterns.

Don't be fooled though, we can create very realistic textures with the procedural method. In fact, many consider it to be the future of texturing.

These two kinds of textures need a material but use different mappings between the texture and the object.

You can check out this article to find a lot of texture based materials.

Related content: Top 10 material libraries for Blender artists

Different methods for putting the texture on the object

There are four main ways that we map textures. Two for image textures and two for procedural textures.

  • UV Mapping
  • Box mapping
  • Generated coordinates
  • Object coordinates

UV Mapping

This is the most common type of mapping for image textures.

UV Mapping is essentially giving the geometry of the object two extra coordinates. We have the X, Y and Z coordinates in the 3D world. But for the objects geometry we add two more coordinates. U and V.

These are not used in the 3D world. Instead, they get 2D world values. We can use these extra coordinates to tell where in the 2D world the 3D object is.

This is the method we will look at more closely since it is so common and versatile.

For a complete guide on UV Mapping you can read this article here:

Related content: The definitive tutorial to UV mapping in Blender

All primitive mesh objects we can add in Blender comes with a default UV Map, but If you have changed the shape into something else you will have to modify the UV Map. We do this in the UV Editor.

You can check that your object have a UV Map in the properties panel. Go to the object data tab and find the UV Map section.

Here you will find a list of UV Maps for your selected object. If the list is empty press the plus button to add one. Double click it to rename.

For now, we only need one, but take note that we may have multiple UV maps added to the same object. We can later access all of them in our material.

Box mapping

With image texture we can also use box mapping, also known as tri-planar projection.

This method takes the image textures and project it from all sides of our object. You can read more about it here:

Related content: Blender box mapping workflow, a quick look

Generated and Object mapping

For procedural textures in Blender we have two different ways that is common for displaying them on an object. We call them generated coordinates and object coordinates.

These are pretty simple and similar, so we will look at them closer to the end of the article.

Viewing the texture in the 3D viewport and rendering an object with a texture.

There are four different view modes in Blender. Two of them are capable of displaying textures and two of them are more geared towards use while modeling or doing other kinds of work.

You can find the view modes in the top right corner of the 3D viewport.

From left to right, the view modes are:

  • Wireframe
  • Solid
  • Material/Lookdev
  • Rendered

By default, we are in solid view. This changes to material view, previously called lookdev, as we go to the shading workspace.

We can see textures only in material view and rendered view. Material view will always look the same but rendered view is dependent on the current render engine. By default, we are in Eevee.

We can switch view mode no matter what workspace we are in by clicking on the icons.

Creating a material

Previously we said that we need two components to make the connection between the object and texture. The mapping is the first and the second is the material.

A material is like a mini-program. It can range from very simple to very complex. It can have multiple textures as inputs and do all sorts of math to generate a complex material. We can also just have a single texture simply displayed on the object.

In this article we will stick to the simplest possible material. To learn more about materials I suggest that you read this article:

Related content: The complete beginners guide to Blender nodes, Eevee, Cycles and PBR

For more advanced users, or after reading the beginners guide these two articles cover more in depth PBR materials, mixing shaders and working with the node editor.

Related content: Physically based rendering and Blender materials

Related content: Physically based rendering, blender nodes, with brick texture example

The default cube comes with a material. But if you don't have one for your object, select your object, go to the material tab in the properties panel and click the plus button next to the list at the top.

This adds a default material to our object. Double click the material in the list to rename it.

If you are not already, switch to the shading workspace at the top of the interface. At this point you should have an object with a material and a UV Map. We only need an image texture.

Importing an image texture

There are many ways to add an image texture to Blender. The fastest is to drag-and-drop the image texture into the shader editor in Blender.

This will add an image texture node in the shader editor with the image attached.

Another way is to first add the image texture node by going to the add menu in the shader editor, go to texture and find "image texture". Place the node in the node editor area to the left of the principled BSDF node. Then press open and browse for the image texture you want.

Configure the material

Once we got the image and an image texture node in the node editor we connect the yellow socket on the right side of the image texture node to the left side "base color" input socket on the principled BSDF.

At this point you should see some kind of texture in the 3D viewport if you are in the shader workspace with material view mode. You added a UV Map to your object and the material is set up with the image texture.

If you don't see the texture, select the object in the viewport, press tab to go into edit mode and press A to select everything. Then press U and choose "Smart UV Project".

This procedure will have Blender generate new UV coordinates based on the "Smart UV Project" algorithm for the whole object. More on this shortly.

Now, notice how the Principled BSDF is connected to the material output node.

The principled BSDF handles the math that converts all the inputs into a common output for display in the viewport and final render.

Also notice the purple input on the left side of the image texture node. This is where we can input a UV Map to tell where on the object different pixels of the image texture goes on the object.

Without an input here, Blender uses the default UV Map.

Texture coordinates and procedural textures

With procedural textures, we don't use the image texture node. Instead, we go to the add menu or press Shift+A in the shader editor. Then we add one of the other texture types. A few good ones to start with are the following:

  • Noise texture
  • Musgrave texture
  • Voronoi texture

We replace the image texture node with one of these procedural texture nodes. Then we add a texture coordinate node from the input sub-menu.

The texture coordinate node has many outputs with purple color. Each one of these is a different kind of mapping we can use.

By default, the procedural textures use "generated" output from the texture coordinate node. We can also use the object output for a different mapping.

A common practice is to use the texture coordinate node and plug it into a mapping node before plugging the mapping node into the texture in question.

With this kind of setup we can use the mapping node to scale, move or rotate the texture by adjusting the values.

Working with a UV Map

At this point we have an object that displays a texture in some way. But how do we change how this texture gets mapped on the object? We change the UV Map.

We will cover the basics. But for more in-depth learning, go read this article:

Related content: The definitive tutorial to UV mapping in Blender

Earlier we learned that we can find the list of UV Maps for the selected object in the mesh data tab in the properties panel. Here we will see a camera icon next to our UV Map. in case we have more than one UV Map, it is the one with the camera icon that counts as the default for rendering.

But for proper previewing we should also make sure that we select the default UV Map so that the background is highlighted.

Now, go to the "UV Editing" workspace and select the material view mode in the 3D viewport on the right side. This is so that we can get immediate feedback on our changes in the UV editor that we see on the left side.

If you don't see an image in the background in the UV editor, you can select your image from the drop-down menu at the top.

To see all or part of the UV Map the faces in question needs to be selected in edit mode in the 3D viewport.

Adjust the UV Map

To make basic manipulations of the UV map we use the same hotkeys as we do in the 3D viewport for transformations and selections are done in the same way.

Click and drag to select part or all of the UV map. Press G, S or R for move, scale or rotate. Also use A and Alt+A to select and deselect.

If you scale the UV map larger than the image, the image will tile across the object.

To recreate the UV Map, in the 3D viewport, select everything or the portion of the object you want to recreate and press U. Then choose one of the projection methods to have Blender recalculate the selected part of the UV Map with the chosen algorithm.

For more info on recreating the UV Map, or rather project the UV map as it is commonly called, check the article linked above.

We can also rotate, move and scale with nodes. Just like we discussed above with the procedural textures. We can use the Texture coordinate node with the UV output, plug it into a mapping node, and plug the mapping node to an image texture node.

This way we can adjust the values in the mapping node to adjust the mapping of the texture.

Making a render of the textured object

To see how the texture looks in your final scene, position the camera and press F12. Depending on if you are using Cycles or Eevee this may take very different amounts of time.

For camera movement and positioning check out this article:

Related article: How to move the camera in Blender

Final thoughts

If you think this content could be helpful to others please consider sharing it on your social media channels. For your own benefit you may also join our newsletter below.

We went from the quickest possible way of adding an image texture to exploring the different parts we need to go from a simple object to an object with material and texture.

We adressed the UV Map for image textures and we are now aware that there are also procedural textures and they use a different kind of mapping.

My top product picks for Blender artists

Recent posts

Sours: https://artisticrender.com/how-to-add-a-texture-to-an-object-in-blender/
[2.8] Blender Tutorial: Adding Textures Quick and Easy

How to add a texture in Blender

texture in blender
sample texture in blender

In this tutorial you will learn how to add a texture in Blender using Cycles render.

Step 1

Using the texture you have made or imported change the default screen layout to compositing for a detailed result.

changing layout to compositing 

Step 2 

Change blender render to cycles render at the top of the screen.

Blender Render
Cycles Render

Step 3

Right click in the plane, click on the material button on the top right corner of the screen, click new.

adding a material

Step 4

If a material is already in place use the subtract button then press new.

subtracting the existing material 

Step 5

Click on the dot right of the white colour.


Step 6


Select image texture, press open and navigate to the image you want to use, once selected open the image/texture.
opening a image texture

Step 7

To map the image on the plane go to edit mode by pressing Tab or changing it from the bar menu.

changing to edit mode

Step 8

Press A to deselect then A again to select everything. go to mesh, UV unwrap, unwrap.

unwrapping the cube

Step 9

On the left side the plane will be unwrapped. Next load the image.

applying the image onto the cube

Step 10 

Switch back to object mode, switch back to the default layout, go to render to see the result.

changing to rendered view

Rendered result 

Lokasi: Sours: https://dyzain.blogspot.com/2016/06/how-to-add-texture-in-blender.html

A in blender texture adding

Introduction: How to Add a Texture in Blender

In this tutorial a will show you how to add a texture to an object using Blender. You can find the VIDEO TUTORIAL HERE

Step 1: Shape

start by pressing shift A then select mesh cylinder

Step 2: Size

Now press S and pick the size you want

Step 3: Height

Press S Z then select the height you want

Step 4: Smooth

Select the smooth tool to the left of your screen (if you do not see it press T)

Step 5: Texture

Now you need to add the texture. First enter the texture screen, then create a new texture and select image or movie, and under image select open. Find the file you want to use as your texture and chose it. Now scroll down to Mapping and set your coordinates to 'Object', set your object to the cylinder we made, and finally set 'Projection' to 'Tube'.

Step 6: Rendering

If you look at it with no render (seen in the top picture) the texture won't show up, but if you start the rendering process, you can see it there. Note: You do need decent lighting for a decent render

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Sours: https://www.instructables.com/How-to-add-a-texture-in-Blender/
Blender 2.9 PBR Texturing Beginner Tutorial

How to add texture to my model? [duplicate]

Adding an image texture can be as simple as going to the Material Properties tab (the little globe near the bottom - covered in this image), and selecting a new material (hit the plus button if there is no material already there). From here you can click on the input of the BaseColor, and choose Image texture. A box will appear allowing you to choose an image file from your PC.

Textures

If you need free textures, one good place to get them is https://3dtextures.me/

However, this site provides full PBR texture sets, which though look the best, are a bit more complicated to set up. this process can be made much easier by the help of a free addon. Go to user preferences, add-ons, and search for "node wrangler". Enable it.

Wrangler

From here, if you go to your shading tab, you can select the Principled BSDF and add whole PBR texture sets at once by pressing + + , or a single image by pressing + .

Wrangler2

Remember that your object must be UV unwrapped for materials to apply correctly. it works on the default cube because it comes with a pre-generated UV map.

answered Sep 25 '20 at 4:06

$\endgroup$Sours: https://blender.stackexchange.com/questions/195644/how-to-add-texture-to-my-model

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