Great basin college course catalog

Great basin college course catalog DEFAULT
Air Conditioning(AC)
  
AC 101Introduction to Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning(3)
A lecture, demonstration, and laboratory course introducing the basics and theory of heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration. In addition to the basic theory, students will also learn basic tools of the industry and how they are used, basic electricity, circuits, wiring, ohms, amps, watts, and resistance will be covered. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Accounting(ACC)
  
ACC 105Taxation for Individuals(3)
An introduction to federal income taxation emphasizing the preparation of personal tax returns. Fundamentals of income, exclusions, deductions, credits, and tax minimization strategies. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 201Financial Accounting(3)
Basic accounting principles and procedures with a focus on the sole proprietorship and partnership form of business. The accounting cycle, receivables, payables, inventory, fixed asset acquisition, and disposal, and financial statement preparation.

ACC 202Managerial Accounting(3)
A continuation of ACC 201 with a concentration on the corporate form of organization. Topics include stockholders' equity, long-term debt, investments, statements of cash flow, financial statement analysis, and an introduction to managerial accounting. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 203Intermediate Accounting I(3)
An in-depth study of various aspects of financial statements prepared according to generally accepted accounting principles. Topics include a review of basic accounting theory and practice, the development of accounting standards, the conceptual framework of accounting, and the treatment of cash, receivables, prepaid expenses, fixed assets, and intangibles. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201 and ACC 202.

ACC 204Intermediate Accounting II(3)
A continuation of ACC 203, Intermediate Accounting I. Topics include current liabilities and contingencies, long-term liabilities, stockholders' equity, investments, income taxes, compensation (salaries, bonuses, stock plans, post-retirement benefits) changes, correction of errors, and earnings per share. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 203.

ACC 220Microcomputer Accounting Systems(3)
Introduction to actual computerized accounting systems being used in the business world. Emphasis is on the application of basic accounting theory using a case study approach. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 261Governmental Accounting(3)
An introduction to accounting and financial reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Includes a study of fund and budget accounts for state and local governmental units, revenues, appropriations, disbursements, assessments, university, hospital, and other fund applications. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201.

ACC 290Certified Bookkeeper Course(3)
This is a capstone course that is to be taken in the final semester of the AAS degree in Accounting program. Students focus systematically on mastering the curriculum for national certification as a professional bookkeeper. Specific topics include adjusting entries, correction of errors, payroll, depreciation, inventory, and internal controls. Prerequisite: Must have completed ACC 201 and ACC 202. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

Agricultural Science(AGSC)
  
AGSC 110Introduction to Agriculture Management(3)
Introduces agriculture management and will focus on the development of personal leadership skills as they relate to agriculture business. Students will investigate, develop, and demonstrate personal leadership skills as related to critical agriculture issues on the regional, state, and national levels.

Applied Industrial Technology(AIT)
  
AIT 120Basic Electrical for Technology(1-3)
Develop a basic understanding of DC and AC electricity in theory, and as it applies to Welding, Diesel, Industrial Millwright Technology, and Electrical Systems Technology.

American Sign Language(AM)
  
AM 145American Sign Language I(4)
Development of American Sign Language and its application within the deaf community. Based on the functional, national approach to learning sign language and organizes language around communicative purpose of everyday interaction. Aspects of the course include cultural awareness, grammatical features, vocabulary development, and conversational skills.

AM 146American Sign Language II(4)
Continuation of AM 145 stressing the development of basic conversational skills. Prerequisite: Must have completed AM 145.

AM 147American Sign Language III(4)
Designed to enable students to develop conversational competency in American Sign Language. Grammatical features and sentence structures will be taught and practiced, as well as conversational norms for receptive and expressive language use. Topics relating to deaf history and culture will be discussed as they enable the student to more effectively communicate and associate with ASL users. Prerequisite: Must have completed AM 146.

AM 148American Sign Language IV(4)
The fourth in a series for American Sign Language courses designed for a student to acquire communicative competency in ASL. The course encourages the student to expand his/her command of discourse in ASL on various everyday topics. Linguistic features of ASL are expanded, including inflection, spatialization, movement, redundancy, and use of facial expression and body postures. Class will be conducted in ASL - no voice conversations will be allowed in the classroom. No chewing gum or eating during class. Prerequisite: Must have completed AM 147.

AM 295Drill and Practice in American Sign Language(0.5-4)
Practice and drill in American Sign Language. Repeatable up to four credits. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

AM 299Special Topics in American Sign Language(3-6)
Development of Signing Exact English and its application within the deaf community. This process of learning sign language organizes language around communicative purpose of everyday interaction. Aspects of the course include cultural awareness, vocabulary development and conversational skills. May be repeated to a maximum of 18 credits.

Anthropology(ANTH)
  
ANTH 101Introduction to Cultural Anthropology(3)
Study of human cultures across the globe through examination of the basic principles underlying the organization of societies and the ways anthropologists analyze various parts of culture. Students will become familiar with the glue that holds all groups of people together, and how that glue can divide groups of people in profound ways.

ANTH 102Physical Anthropology(3)
Introduction to the study of how humans, Homo sapiens, have emerged as a species and come to dominate the planet by examining processes of human biological and cultural evolution. Topics include inheritance, the emergence of primates, fossil hominids, the development of technology, and biological variability among modern humans. Satisfies general education science.

ANTH 201Peoples and Cultures of the World(3)
Introduction to the diversity of indigenous, traditional societies in select regions of the world including such groups as herding people in Africa, hunters and gatherers in Australia, farmers in New Guinea, headhunters in Borneo, among others. The course focuses on the ethnographic description of traditional cultures and the impacts of colonization and globalization on those societies.

ANTH 202Archaeology(3)
Study of the archaeological patterns found in the Old and New Worlds and how archaeologists study the past. Focuses on topics like the cultural changes throughout the world as early humans began making tools in Africa to the rise of civilizations such as those found in Egypt and Mexico.

ANTH 332(De)Constructing Race(3)
This course examines the concept of race from an anthropological perspective¿it is an exploration of the biological basis for human variation, the construction of racial categories, the nature of social hierarchy and inequality, and the role of race in systemic inequalities (i.e., education, economics, environment, health security, the legal system, the policing system, food security, housing, political organization, and so on) in the United States and elsewhere. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits and have completed (ENG 102 or ENG 333) and (MATH 120 or MATH 120E or MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher or STAT 152).

ANTH 400AIndians of North America(3)
Ethnographic survey of the wide variety of societies found in native North America, including regions such as the Plains, the Arctic, the Southwest, and the Southeast, among others. Course provides an overview of social institutions (i.e., religion, food getting and settlement, kinship, etc.) and changes resultant of European contact and colonization. Satisfies the diversity requirement at UNR. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one of the following: ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or instructor approval.

ANTH 400BIndians of the Great Basin(3)
Study of indigenous cultures of the intermountain region of Western North America including such groups as the Washoe, the Western Shoshone, the Northern Paiute, and the Ute. Course provides an overview of social institutions (i.e., religion, food getting and settlement, kinship, etc.) and changes resultant of European contact and colonization. Satisfies diversity requirement at UNR. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one of the following: ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or instructor approval.

ANTH 406Art in Small-Scale Societies(3)
This course focuses on the 'traditional' production and meaning of art in small-scale societies as well as the changes that occur with colonization and globalization among select groups from locations such as Africa, New Guinea, Australia, North and South America, and the Pacific Islands. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or GEOG 106.

ANTH 439Selected Topics in Cultural Anthropology(3)
Topic to be selected by the instructor and will reflect student needs. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one of the following: ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or instructor approval.

ANTH 440BArchaeology of the Great Basin(3)
Examines the prehistory of the Great Basin region, including the Paleoindian, Archaic periods, and later prehistoric occupations. Explores what kinds of data archaeologists use to construct culture histories and the environmental and social factors that influenced prehistoric patterns. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one of the following: ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or instructor approval.

ANTH 458Origins of Inequality: A Cross-Cultural Perspective(3)
This course explores the nature of social inequality in multiple cultural contexts including how inequality emerged in human history across time and space, and how it is expressed in different contemporary cultural contexts. Prerequisite: Must have completed ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or GEOG 106 or SOC 101.

ANTH 459Selected Topics in Archaeology(3)
Topic to be selected by the instructor and will reflect student needs. May be repeated to a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one of the following: ANTH 101 or ANTH 201 or ANTH 202 or instructor approval.

ART 100Visual Foundations(3)
A beginning art class that includes a survey of art and the basic components of design. The class explores visual concepts as they relate to the history of art through class presentations, discussions, and a variety of media. Students should plan for three hours of studio work outside the class.

ART 101Drawing I(3)
A disciplined foundation in drawing concepts based on visual observation skills.

ART 102Drawing II(3)
A continuation of ART 101. Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 101.

ART 106Jewelry I(3)
Techniques of various metal construction for jewelry. Emphasis on design and craftsmanship.

ART 107Design Fundamentals I (2-D)(3)
Explores the fundamentals of design using various media focusing on 2-D design.

ART 108Design Fundamentals II (3-D)(3)
Creative design with emphasis on volume and space relationships in a variety of materials.

ART 111Beginning Ceramics(3)
Introductory and intermediate course in beginning ceramics. May repeat course up to six credits.

ART 115Beginning Clay Sculpture(3)
Introduction to design and creation of sculpture with clay.

ART 124Introduction to Printmaking(3)
Introduction to the traditional printmaking processes. [S/U]

ART 127Watercolor I(3)
Introduction to watercolor techniques and concepts. Requires three hours of studio practice weekly.

ART 135Photography I(3)
Analytical and critical approaches to the creative possibilities of photography including basic photographic techniques and materials.

ART 141Introduction to Digital Photography(3)
An introduction to the aspects of digital photography. Explores how to improve photographic skills and integration of photography and the digital media.

ART 142Introduction to Digital Photography II(3)
A continuation of Digital Photography. Employs further investigation of the digital media and current version of Photoshop. Repeatable up to six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 141.

ART 160Art Appreciation(3)
Introduction to the visual arts, illustrating the place of art in its social and cultural setting.

ART 201Life Drawing I(3)
Introduction to drawing from live models. Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 101.

ART 206Jewelry II(3)
Continued exploration of creating jewelry using various techniques.

ART 211Ceramics I(3)
A beginning studio course in construction and decoration of clay. Slab, coil, and wheel-thrown techniques will be taught.

ART 212Ceramics II(3)
Continuation of ART 111 with emphasis on development of individual expression in clay.

ART 216Sculpture I(3)
Introduction to sculpting techniques and concepts.

ART 227Watercolor II(3)
Continued exploration of watercolor techniques and concepts.

ART 231Painting I(3)
Exploration of various painting media and concepts.

ART 232Painting II(3)
Continuation of exploration of painting techniques and concepts. Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 231.

ART 235Photography II(3)
Lecture/study with emphasis on improving basic and intermediate skills. Explores the use of photography as a personal expression. Prerequisite: Must have completed ART 135.

ART 243Digital Imaging I(3)
Introduction to computer based imaging.

ART 260Survey of Art History I(3)
Presentation of the historical context of major and minor works of art from the ancient world to the Renaissance, art analysis, and criticism. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 100 or ENG 101 or have satisfactory score in ACT or SAT exams for ENG 102.

ART 261Survey of Art History II(3)
A continuation of Survey of Art History I presenting major and minor works of art from the Renaissance to the present, art analysis, and criticism. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 100 or ENG 101 or have satisfactory score in ACT or SAT exams for ENG 102.

ART 297Field Study(1-3)
A study of art in its cultural and historical setting. May repeat course up to six credits.

ART 299Special Topics in Studio Art(0.5-3)
Consideration of special topics and issues in art. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. May repeat course up to 12 credits. [S/U]

Astronomy(AST)
  
AST 101General Astronomy(3)
An introductory examination of the solar system, stellar systems, and stellar and galactic evolution according to currently accepted concepts. Introduces astronomical instruments and light theory. Prerequisite: Must have completed with a C or better or be currently enrolled in: MATH 116 or MATH 116E or MATH 120 or MATH 120E or MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher.

Biochemistry(BCH)
  
BCH 400Introductory Biochemistry(4)
A comprehensive overview of the three major areas in Biochemistry. Structure and function of Biomolecules, Metabolism, and Molecular Biology. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and CHEM 242 or have completed BIOL 190 and be enrolled in CHEM 242 with instructor's permission.

Biology(BIOL)
  
BIOL 100General Biology for Non Majors(3)
Basic biological concepts, interpretation and application of scientific methods, and effects of biological advances on society. Core curriculum science course; cannot be used for credit toward field of concentration in biology. Prerequisite: Must have completed with a C or better or be currently enrolled in: MATH 116 or MATH 116E or MATH 120 or MATH 120E or MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher.

BIOL 105Introduction to Neuroscience(3)
An introduction to neuroscience and the impact of neural diseases on society. Same as PSY 105.

BIOL 124Northeastern Nevada Plants(2)
Study of plant identification, structure, floral adaptations, and plant ecology of native plants in northeastern Nevada.

BIOL 190Introduction to Cell and Molecular Biology(4)
Structure and function of cells. Major molecules of life; composition and physiology of cellular organelles; cell metabolism, reproduction, motility, and gene function of both plant and animal cells. Required for biology majors. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed with a C or better: MATH 116 or MATH 116E or MATH 120 or MATH 120E or MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher; or be currently enrolled in MATH 116 or MATH 120 or MATH 126 or higher.

BIOL 191Introduction to Organismal Biology(4)
The study of the evolution, ecology, and diversity of life, both past and present. Required for biology majors, but will partially satisfy the science requirement for all associate's degrees. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190.

BIOL 223Human Anatomy and Physiology I(4)
The morphology and physiology of cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems in a laboratory and lecture class. Designed for all life science majors but specifically for students in allied health programs. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be enrolled in BIOL 100 or BIOL 190.

BIOL 224Human Anatomy and Physiology II(4)
A continuation of Biology 223 with consideration of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, excretory, endocrine, and reproductive systems; increased emphasis on body chemistry. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 223.

BIOL 251General Microbiology(4)
A laboratory and lecture course emphasizing taxonomy, morphology, physiology, infectious diseases, and ecology of microorganisms in addition to skills in aseptic procedures, isolation, and identification. Open to all life science majors and allied health majors. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 100 or BIOL 190.

BIOL 299Special Topics in Biology(1-4)
Topics of interest emphasizing the natural history of the Great Basin including winter bird watching, hawk watching in the Goshutes, small mammal ecology, and the flowers of the Ruby Mountains. Includes field trips. Unlimited repeatability.

BIOL 300Principles of Genetics(4)
Study of the basic principles of transmission of traits from one generation to the next. Topics include Mendelian, population, and molecular genetics with an emphasis on gene regulation. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic systems will be described. Three hours of lecture with three hours of laboratory. It is recommended that student have completed CHEM 241 before enrolling in this course. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and CHEM 122 and STAT 152 and be sophomore or higher standing.

BIOL 305Introduction to Conservation Biology(3)
Fundamental topics in conservation biology including biodiversity, invasive and endangered species, reserve design, and environmental legislation. Lecture only. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191.

BIOL 315Cell Biology(3)
Cell structure and function at the molecular level. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and CHEM 122.

BIOL 320Invertebrate Zoology(4)
The study of animals that lack a dorsal nerve cord (backbone). This course explores the origin, evolution, taxonomy, physiology, and morphology of invertebrate members of the kingdom of Animalia. The laboratory component of this course emphasizes the similarities and differences of animal phyla and requires examination and dissection of preserved specimens. Concurrent enrollment in a corresponding lab section is required for this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and be sophomore standing or higher.

BIOL 331Plant Taxonomy(3)
The study of vascular plant identification, naming, and classification, within an evolutionary context. Evolutionary processes and the history of systematics will be discussed. Laboratory experiences will emphasize angiosperm family characteristics, the collection and preservation of plant specimens, and the identification of the northeastern Nevada flora. The course will require two hours of lecture with three hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191.

BIOL 341Principles of Ecology(3)
The fundamentals of ecology studied at the levels of population, community, and ecosystems. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and STAT 152.

BIOL 394Laboratory in Ecology and Population Biology(2)
Research techniques and investigative approaches in field and laboratory studies. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 191 and STAT 152 and be enrolled in or have completed BIOL 341.

BIOL 401Biology Journal Seminar(1)
Survey of periodical literature of biology. Oral and written reports by the student will give experience in searching and interpreting literature. May be repeated up to six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 191.

BIOL 410Plant Physiology(3)
A survey of the basic physiologic processes of plants. Topics include photosynthesis, metabolism, nutrition, growth and development, as well as effect of environment on these processes. It is recommended that student have completed CHEM 241 before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and CHEM 122 and be sophomore standing.

BIOL 415Evolution(4)
Pattern and process in the evolution of life on earth. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 and BIOL 190 and (BIOL 300 or BIOL 341) and be in junior or senior standing.

BIOL 432Herpetology(4)
Introduction to the ecology, behavior, and evolution of amphibians and non-avian reptiles. Laboratory emphasizes the study of diagnostic characters for major groups of amphibians and reptiles, as well as field studies of species native to the Great Basin region. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 191.

BIOL 434Mammalogy(4)
The study of mammals. This course explores the origin, evolution, taxonomy, morphology, physiology, biogeography, behavior, and ecology of mammals. Laboratory will stress identification and natural history of mammals native to Nevada. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and be sophomore standing or higher.

BIOL 447Advanced Comparative Animal Physiology(3)
Comparative physiology provides a detailed understanding of the diverse array of physiological systems evolved to allow animals to function in various environments. The comparative approach is used to understand physiological adaptations to various environments and the evolution of physiological systems. It is recommended that student have completed CHEM 241 before enrolling in this course. Prerequisite: Student must have completed BIOL 190 and BIOL 191 and CHEM 122.

BIOL 496Advanced Topics in Modern Biology(1-3)
Advanced study in a specialized area of biology. Topics are selected and published in the class schedule. May be repeated up to six credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 190 or BIOL 191. Instructor permission required.

Business(BUS)
  
BUS 101Introduction to Business(3)
A one-semester survey course covering business organization, operation, and management, designed to orient the student to the field of business.

BUS 102Introduction to Entrepreneurship(3)
Course serves as the foundation for the GBC Associate of Applied Science--Entrepreneurship Emphasis degree program. Introduces techniques, principles, and challenges facing today's entrepreneurs using practical examples. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 110Human Relations for Employment(1-3)
Introduces students to the principles and skills of effective communication in business and professional settings. It provides information on how to communicate with superiors, co-workers, subordinates, clients, and customers. Three-credit course includes a computation component. Repeatable up to a total of three credits. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 117Business Calculations and Methods(3)
Fundamental arithmetic processes applied to business activities and applications. Including discounts, markups, payroll, interest, annuities, present value of money, depreciation, tax computations, business statistics, and general application of mathematics for planning and problem solving using algebraic equations/graphics and other basic forecasting techniques. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

BUS 198Special Topics in Business(1-3)
Selected business topics offered for general interest and the business community. Not a required course. May be repeated for credit if topics are different.

BUS 201Entrepreneurship II(3)
Extends techniques, principles, and challenges facing today's aspiring entrepreneurs using practical examples. The major project for the course is the preparation of a useful business plan, instructions on acquiring financing, and explanations of other business startup activities, especially, setting up marketing programs and strategic/tactical plans. Recommended prerequisite: BUS 102 or MGT 103. Prerequisite: Must have completed BUS 101 or BUS 102.

BUS 273Business Law I(3)
A study of the origin, philosophy, and nature of law and procedures including court systems, contracts, agency, partnerships, sales, criminal law, and torts.

BUS 274Business Law II(3)
A continuation of BUS 273. Includes a study of corporation law, property, secured transactions, negotiable instruments, insurance, and bankruptcy. Prerequisite: Must have completed BUS 273.

BUS 275Foundations of International Business(3)
Introduces students to the impact of geography, the Internet, and different environments in which international business is conducted and the uncontrollable forces at work in all business environments. Topics discussed will include the importance of international organizations, the international monetary system, and the relevance of certain aspects of international business to managers and business people.

Computer Aided Drafting and Design(CADD)
  
CADD 121CAD for Land Surveyors(3)
The use of computer-aided drafting (CAD) software to create survey plats and topographic maps. The first ten weeks of instruction will focus on learning basic CAD commands. The remaining five weeks will focus on the production of typical survey plats and topographic maps.

CADD 245Solid Modeling and Parametric Design(3)
Provides training and instruction in using parametric solid modeling software to create solid model parts, assemblies and working drawings. Students will have the opportunity to acquire the CSWA certificate for Solidworks.

CADD 421Advanced CAD for Land Surveyors(3)
The use of computer-aided drafting (CAD) software to create survey plats and topographic maps. Instruction will focus on learning COGO tools, the Command Prompt, traverse with Carlson SurvNet, use deed data to create a deed file, perform deed correlation with field data, create and edit lots and areas and generate lots and setbacks, setup Field to Finish codes and generate 2D and 3D geometry, and utilize various critical coordinate file utilities. Instructor permission required.

Chemistry(CHEM)
  
CHEM 100Molecules and Life in the Modern World(3)
Introduction to chemistry in its many forms and applications, physical and organic, with consideration of environmental and social issues. Includes laboratory activities. Prerequisite: Must have completed with a C or better: MATH 116 or MATH 116E or MATH 120 or MATH 120E or MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher; or be currently enrolled in MATH 116 or MATH 120 or MATH 126 or higher.

CHEM 121General Chemistry I(4)
Fundamentals of chemistry including reaction stoichiometry, atomic structure, chemical bonding, molecular structure, states of matter, and thermochemistry. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher; or be enrolled in MATH 126.

CHEM 122General Chemistry II(4)
Fundamentals of chemistry including solutions, kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, and properties of inorganic and organic compounds. Also, introduction to qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 121.

CHEM 241Organic Chemistry I(3)
Intensive introduction to the theory of carbon chemistry with particular emphasis on understanding the relationship between the structure and behavior of organic molecules. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 122 and be enrolled in CHEM 241L.

CHEM 241LOrganic Chemistry for life Sciences Lab I(1)
Laboratory exercises in introductory organic chemistry. Stereochemistry, separation and purification techniques, micro-scale organic reaction procedures. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in CHEM 241.

CHEM 242Organic Chemistry II(3)
Continuation of CHEM 241 with emphasis on complex reactions and mechanisms, and introduction to advanced approaches for the synthesis of organic molecules. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 241 and be enrolled in CHEM 242L.

CHEM 242LOrganic Chemistry for Life Sciences Lab II(1)
Laboratory exercises in intermediate organic chemistry with continued emphasis on micro-scale organic reaction procedures. Introduction to the identification of organic compounds using chemical and instrumental means (qualitative analysis). Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in CHEM 242.

CHEM 292Selected Topics in Chemistry(1-3)
Independent study of a special problem, research and/or assigned reading in chemistry. May be repeated up to six credits.

CHEM 392Special Topics in Chemistry(1-3)
Laboratory or lecture course in area not covered in other courses. May be repeated up to six credits.

CHEM 492Advanced Topics in Chemistry(1-2)
Selected topics from the various disciplines of chemistry not covered by any other course offerings and of current interest to students and faculty. May be repeated up to four credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed CHEM 242.

Computer and Information Technology(CIT)
  
CIT 110A+ Hardware(3)
Techniques of personal computer hardware maintenance and installation. Course covers hardware and software diagnostics, system troubleshooting, and methods of achieving effective system upgrades to enhance capabilities or improve system performance.

CIT 112Network +(3)
Course covers computer network infrastructure, network uses, and basic network management issues. CIT 112 has no prerequisite but assumes that students are familiar with computer hardware, have a basic understanding of stand-alone operating systems, and can use applications software. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 129Introduction to Programming(3)
A first course in programming. Offers an introductory course on computer program design and development. Emphasizes identification and solution of business problems through the use of logic development tools and scripting languages. Prerequisite: Must have completed MATH 126 or higher.

CIT 130Beginning Java(3)
Java is a general-purpose, object-oriented programming language best known for, but not limited to, creating applets to run on the Internet. This course will include applet creation, but the primary emphasis will be on general purpose object-oriented programming. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 129.

CIT 151Beginning Web Development(3)
Create and maintain web pages using HTML. Build interactive web pages using dynamic HTML. Topics include images, tables, frames, CSS styles, forms, FTP, and site maintenance.

CIT 152Web Script Language Programming(3)
A continuation of CIT 151, Beginning Web Development. This programming class creates interactive web pages using technologies such as Javascript, SQL, and server-side programming language. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 129 and CIT 151.

CIT 173Linux Installation and Configuration(3)
Course covers Linux installation, configuration, and workstation operating system concepts.

CIT 174Linux System Administration(3)
Covers concepts required for Linux server system administration and common networking services configuration, operation, and management. There is no formal prerequisite, however, CIT 173 or a basic understanding of either the UNIX or Linux workstation environment is recommended.

CIT 180Database Concepts and SQL(3)
This class is targeted for people with little or no SQL knowledge. The objective of this class is to familiarize students with database concepts that will be needed by programmers as well as professionals maintaining data management systems in such as those used in GIS. The class is accented with hands-on learning in Structured Query Language (SQL) and SQL procedures. CIT 129 recommended but not required.

CIT 198Special Topics in Computer Info Technology(1)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of subjects in computer and information technology. The course will be variable credit depending on the class content and number of hours required to cover that content. No prerequisites, but various skills may be recommended depending on class content, see syllabus for any such recommendations. Unlimited repeatability. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 201Word Certification Preparation(3)
A hands-on course building on the foundation laid in COT 151 and continuing on to sophisticated manipulation of word processing software. Topics include tables, graphic boxes, clip art, desktop publishing, fonts, macros, styles, and spreadsheets. Recommend: COT 151. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 202Excel Certification Preparation(3)
In-depth exploration of Excel spreadsheets. Topics include advanced functions, importing and exporting data, multiple tables and workbooks, pivot tables, macros, and VBA. Team and student projects are conducted. Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 203Access Certification Preparation(3)
In-depth exploration of Access database management. Topics include tables, relationships, queries, forms, and reports. Macros, VBA modules, and web pages are created. Team and student projects are conducted in building and maintaining a database. Access 2007 required. Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 211Microsoft Networking I(3-5)
Course covers MS Windows workstation/client operating systems concepts in both a network and stand alone environment.

CIT 212Microsoft Networking II(3-5)
Introduces students to computer network server administration and management using MSMCSE II. CIT 211 or an advanced understanding of a Windows desktop environment is recommended.

CIT 213Microsoft Networking III(3-5)
Teaches strategies and tactics for implementing, administering, and troubleshooting information systems that incorporate Windows NT Server or Windows 2000 Server in an enterprise computing environment. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 212.

CIT 214Microsoft Networking IV(3-5)
Course covers computer network directory services using Microsoft's Active Directory Services. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 212.

CIT 215Microsoft Networking V(3-5)
Various topics in networking using Microsoft products aimed at the less common MCSE electives. Unlimited repeatability. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 212.

CIT 217Security +(3)
Prepares professionals with some networking experience and who possess a thorough knowledge of TCP/IP to take and pass the CompTIA Security + certification exam. Topics will include general security basics of cryptography and operational/ organizational security. Working knowledge and network servers or associated certifications would be considered essential.

CIT 252Web Database Development(3)
Interactive web pages will be built to accomplish store front applications. Storefront software will be used to produce shopping cart applications with product display, shopping cart, check out, and confirmation web pages along with several databases. Prerequisite: Must have completed IS 201 or CIT 151 or CIT 129 or CIT 203 or GRC 188.

CIT 261VBA Programming for Microsoft Office(3)
Visual Basic for applications involves programming inside Microsoft Office, Word, Excel, and Access. This is the most common type of programming in today's work world and creates more interactivity in the office software. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 129 or CIT 202 or CIT 203.

CIT 263Project Management(3)
The purpose of this course is to help students gain the knowledge required to effectively plan, implement, and complete IT projects across the organization. Topics will include business practices, interpersonal skills, and management process.

CIT 264Operating System Security(3)
Covers a full range of security concepts, techniques, and applications as required by server operating systems and networks. This will include VPNs, authentication, encryption, and patching. It will culminate in discussions of monitoring, auditing, and disaster recovery. Recommended prerequisite: CIT 212 or CIT 173. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CIT 303Intermediate Survey of Computing(3)
This course surveys essential concepts in a wide range of computing fields including database management, GIS, graphic communications, networking, and programming required by managers of computing systems and departments. This class assumes students understand at least one area of computing well then builds on that understanding to provide them with a survey of additional computing technologies that IT managers could reasonably be expected to facilitate and supervise. Prerequisite: Must have completed an AAS degree and COT 204.

CIT 361TCP/IP: Managing Network Resources(3)
Course provides in-depth coverage of TCP/IP concepts, protocols, and programming including IPv6. Prerequisite: Must have completed (CIT 112 or CIT 303) and MATH 116 or higher.

CIT 454E Commerce(3)
eCommerce concepts and topics will be examined. Working eCommerce sites will be developed on the Internet. Prerequisite: Must have declared AAS - Web Specialist Emphasis or have completed COT 301 or CIT 303.

CIT 480SQL Database Design and Implementation(3)
This course covers concepts required to design, implement, and administer a database management system for use in a modern organization. The emphasis will be on database structures, logical and physical data organization, the relational database model, development of stored programs, and database administration. Prerequisite: Must have completed CIT 180.

Comprehensive Medical Imaging(CMI)
  
CMI 350Ultrasound Physics and Instrumentation(4)
Principles of acoustical physics, Doppler Ultrasound and ultrasound instrumentation. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Sonography Program.

CMI 351Abdominal Ultrasound(3)
Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal anatomical structures, disease processes, pathology, and pathophysiology of the abdomen. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Sonography Program.

CMI 352Obstetric Ultrasound(3)
Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal maternal, embryonic, and fetal anatomical structures and obstetric disease processes, pathology, and pathophysiology. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Sonography Program.

CMI 353Gynecologic Ultrasound(3)
Recognition and identification of the sonographic appearance of normal anatomical structures of the female pelvis and gynecological disease processes, pathology and pathophysiology. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Sonography Program.

CMI 376Sectional Anatomy in Medical Imaging(3)
This online course will cover transverse, coronal, and sagittal anatomy of the head, neck, thorax, abdomen, pelvis, and extremities. Areas of discussion include skeletal, muscular, circulatory, respiratory, nervous. lymphatic, and visceral anatomic relationships. Prerequisite: Must have completed BIOL 223 or EMS 204 or instructor permission.

CMI 486Diagnostic Medical Imaging Clinical Experience I(11)
Clinical applications of instrumentation, quality control, patient care and performance of diagnostic medical sonography procedures under the direction or observation of a clinical sonographer. Prerequisite: Must have completed CMI 350 and CMI 351 and CMI 353 with a 'C' or higher.

CMI 487Diagnostic Medical Imaging Clinical Experience II(8)
Continuation of clinical hours to build clinical applications of instrumentation, quality control, patient care and performance of diagnostic medical sonography procedures under the direction or observation of a clinical sonographer. Prerequisite: Must have completed CMI 486 with a 'C' or higher.

CMI 488Diagnostic Medical Imaging Clinical Experience III(14)
Continuation of clinical hours to build clinical applications of instrumentation, quality control, patient care and performance of diagnostic medical sonography procedures under the direction or observation of a clinical sonographer. Prerequisite: Must have completed CMI 487 with a 'C' or higher.

CMI 492Comprehensive Medical Imaging Capstone(3)
This course utilizes knowledge and experience gained from comprehensive medical imaging and general education courses to develop links between scholastic and professional experiences. This course will emphasize leadership, fiscal and personal responsibilities, and prepare students for a successful transition into the professional workforce. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Sonography Program.

Communications(COM)
  
COM 101Oral Communication(3)
Introduction to the fundamentals of effective speaking. Develops the vocal and intellectual skills required for effective and powerful speaking in conversation and before an audience.

COM 113Fundamentals of Speech Communication(3)
Principles and theories of speech communication. Participation in public speaking and interpersonal communication activities.

COM 159Writing for Radio and Television(3)
An introduction to basic script formats, terminology, style, and writing techniques for radio, television, and other electronic media. Topics include commercials, promotions, public relations, instruction/training, corporate video, and teleplays. Develops the ability to write aurally as well as visually.

Computer Office Technology(COT)
  
COT 101Computer Keyboarding I(3)
Learn the keyboard by touch using computers. Course covers alphabet keys, number keys, and symbol keys. Emphasis on keyboarding techniques, speed, and accuracy.

COT 151Introduction to Microsoft Word(3)
An introduction to Microsoft Word, a word processing software, ruler, toolbars, dialog boxes, cut, copy, and paste, autocorrect, spell check, template documents, columns, outlines, merge, clip art, graphics, text art, and tables. Recommended: COT 101 or 30 words per minute keyboarding skill.

COT 198Special Topics in Computer Office Technology(1-6)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of subjects. The class will be variable credit of one to six depending on the class content and number of hours required. No prerequisite, but various skills recommended, depending on class content. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

COT 204Using Windows(3)
The fundamentals necessary to operate the Windows system, how to customize the Windows environment, and how to use the various accessories.

COT 240Executive Office Procedures(3)
Introduces skills and knowledge to meet the challenges of the electronic office. Topics include public relations, written and oral communications, telephone techniques, travel and conference arrangements, records management, meeting planning, and job-seeking/selection.

COT 241Medical Office Procedures(3)
Introduces medical office administrative procedures. Topics include appointment processing, written and oral communications, ethics, confidentiality, HIPAA, medical records, patient orientation and safety. Upon completion, students should be able to perform basic administrative skills within the medical environment. Emphasis on developing human relations and customer service skills.

COT 290Internship in Computer Technology(1-6)
A course designed wherein students will apply knowledge and skills to real on-the-job situations in a program designed by a company official and a faculty advisor to maximize learning experiences. Available to students who have completed most Core and Major requirements and have a 2.5 GPA. Contact the instructor for the application, screening, and required skills evaluation. Up to six semester hour credits may be earned on the basis of 75 hours of internship for one credit. This course may be repeated for up to six credits Instructor permission required.

COT 301Database Management Essentials(1)
A working overview of Access database. The main emphasis will be on analyzing previously established data, using table searches, queries, and reports. Excel will be used for further data analysis. A discussion of table design will be included. Students will start work on individual portfolios of their achievements during this degree program. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must have completed an AAS degree.

COT 490Digital Communications(3)
A capstone seminar covering the common theme of data communications among the BAS in Digital Information Technology courses. Relationships between data organization, digital multimedia, data presentation, data security, and data communications will be covered. Students will finalize the digital portfolio of their accomplishments while completing this degree program. Instructor permission required.

Counseling and Personal Development(CPD)
  
CPD 116Substance Abuse - Fundamental Facts and Insights(3)
An introduction to various issues relating to alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs in society. Students will gain knowledge of the physical effects of various drugs of abuse. Sociological, cultural, family impact, and prevention issues will be addressed. No prerequisite.

Criminal Justice(CRJ)
  
CRJ 104Introduction to Administration of Justice(3)
American criminal justice system, its development, components, and processes. Includes consideration of crime and criminal justice as a formal area of study.

CRJ 105Corrections Operations and Jail Management(3)
Investigations will be made into the court structures, constructive and punishment-oriented correctional institution programs, and the present day correctional officers' roles. Jail and prison life and adjustment will be discussed along with ways in which the correctional institution climate can be enhanced. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 106Introduction to Corrections(3)
History and development of corrections. Current practices and problems of the correctional system. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 110Introduction to Nevada Law Enforcement(3)
This course provides a systematic approach to examination of criminal justice in the State of Nevada. It will also include an overview of the major subsystems: police, prosecution, defense, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice. Designed for students who will be attending the Law Enforcement Training Academy. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 111Firearms I(3)
Laws of arrest, search, and seizure; moral, legal, and ethical aspects of the use of deadly force; firearm handling and safety, range nomenclature, marksmanship, and qualification. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 112Criminal Justice Organization and Administration(3)
Theory of management and motivation, bureaucracy, labor laws and relations, financial administration, and criminal justice agency administration. An in-depth study of the goals, policies, and functions of the criminal justice agency. Recommend: CRJ 104

CRJ 114Firearms II(2)
Course includes advanced range qualification, precision marksmanship, defensive measures, counter ambush procedures, combat shooting, robbery in progress, building searches, and shotgun use. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 120Community Relations(3)
Analyzes the reasons and techniques for developing communication and understanding between the criminal justice system and various segments of the community. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 140Elements of Supervision(3)
An introduction to supervisory roles in criminal justice agencies, selection process for supervisors, models for decision making, and leadership styles. Addresses current trends in contemporary supervision within the criminal justice field. Covers the rights, obligations, and duties of line supervisors. Assesses the first-line supervisor's role within the law enforcement agency. Instructor permission required.

CRJ 155Juvenile Justice System(3)
Study of the philosophy and function of the juvenile court including court procedures and law, theories of causation and intervention strategies for juvenile offenders. Includes police encounters with juveniles, the juvenile court process, juvenile dispositions, and after care. Discussions include dependent and neglected youth in the system, the death penalty for juveniles, and school crimes. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 164Introduction to Criminal Investigation(3)
Forensic Science I - The Crime Scene to Follow Up. Fundamentals of investigation, crime scene search and recording, collection and presentation of physical evidence, scientific aids, sources of information, case preparation, interviews and interrogations, and follow-up. Recommend prerequisite: CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 170Physical Training for Law Enforcement(1)
P.O.S.T. pretest. Physical training relevant to a law enforcement profession to prepare for the final physical training test. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 180Introduction to Security(3)
History and development of security services function, interrelationship to the legal process, career roles, and operational processes in various types of security organizations. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 201Women in the Criminal Justice System(3)
Overall view of both sides and the roles in which women participate in the Criminal Justice System. The main concentration of the course will be in the following areas: theories of female criminality, extent of female crime, women as victims, women as offenders, women as defendants and prisoners, and women as practitioners and professionals, i.e., police, courts, and corrections. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 211Police in America(3)
Course includes policy history and organization, the personal side of policing, police operations, critical issues in policing, specific police problems, women and minorities in policing, and becoming a police officer. Designed to help students develop their own philosophy of law enforcement. Critical thinking and discussion of ideas and opinions essential. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 214Principles of Police Patrol Techniques(3)
Identification of community problems which require prevention, suppression, or control through the basic methods and techniques of police patrol. The responsibilities of officers in patrol situations including foot beats, one-man cars and/or tactical units, techniques of observation and perception, recognition of hazards, evaluation, and proper police patrol action. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 215Probation and Parole(3)
Survey of the probation and parole systems of the United States including different systems within the United States; executive clemency; parole; rights of prisoners, probationers, and parolees; treatment strategies; and administrative aspects. Includes correctional and professional aspects of the parole and probation officers: the role, preparation of a probation summary, a day in court with a probation officer, and time with a parole officer. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 219Emergency Vehicle Operation and Control(3)
Shuffle steering, steering motion dynamics, and vehicle braking (lock-wheel, ABS, impending). Pursuit driving times (vehicle timing) and techniques. Measurement of hearing and tunnel vision. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 220Criminal Procedures(3)
Origin, development, and rationale of the structural and procedural aspects of America's criminal justice system. Emphasis on arrest, search and seizure, confessions, and related legal issues. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 226Prevention and Control of Delinquency(3)
An introduction to major types of delinquent behavior, psychology of the delinquent, and factors contributing to the production of criminality or delinquency. Discussion of methods used by the criminal justice system to control delinquent behavior. Recommend: CRJ 104.

CRJ 229Defensive Tactics(1-3)
Protection against persons armed with dangerous and/or deadly weapons. Demonstration and drill in a number of holds, come alongs, restraints, and baton use. [S/U] This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 230Criminal Law(3)
Substantive criminal law including elements of crime, intent, attempts, search and seizure, and the laws of arrest. Relation of criminal law to working police officer and rights and duties of both citizen and officer under criminal law. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 232Principles of Correctional Administration(3)
Principles of staff operation within the correction process; administration setting, budgeting and financial control, recruitment and development of staff, public relations, and decision making; information concerning the offender, why they classify in a certain manner, and varied strategies available. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 233Nevada Criminal Law(3)
Familiarizes the CRJ student with Nevada Criminal Law as set forth in the Nevada Revised Statutes and as interpreted and tested in cases before the Nevada Courts. Instructor permission required. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 265Introduction to Physical Evidence(3)
Forensic Science II - The Crime Lab to Courtroom. Surveys the forensic sciences to show their role in the use of physical evidence in matters of criminal and/or civil law. Focus on the value of modern scientific investigation. Recommended prerequisite: CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 270Introduction to Criminology(3)
Examines how society interacts with crime and delinquency through the use of the criminal justice system. Studies effective interaction and communication between the general public and members of the criminal justice system. Emphasizes the understanding of criminal behavior from a sociological and psychological perspective. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 285Special Topics in Criminal Justice(1-6)
Consideration of special topics and issues in criminal justice. Selection will depend upon current interests and needs. Unlimited repeatability. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CRJ 289Law and Justice(3)
Survey of law and justice from a multi-disciplinary perspective with special emphasis on comparative justice systems, race, ethnicity, and gender. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 or instructor permission.

CRJ 444Criminological Theory(3)
Comprehensive interdisciplinary examination of theories of criminal etiology from neurological, biochemical, genetic, psychological, psychiatric, social, economic and political perspectives. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 270 and ENG 102, or instructor approval.

CRJ 469Psychology and the Legal System(3)
Psychological perspective for understanding legal issues. Topics include police psychology, eyewitness accuracy, jury decision-making, competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, civil commitment, violence risk assessment, correctional psychology, criminal psychology profiling, and psychological impact of victimization. Prerequisite: Must have completed CRJ 104 and PSY 101, or instructor approval.

Computer Science(CS)
  
CS 135Computer Science I(3)
This course is an introduction to modern problem solving and programming methods. Emphasis is placed on algorithm development. A special focus will be on procedural and data abstraction, emphasizing design, testing, and documentation. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in or have completed MATH 126 or MATH 126E or higher.

Cisco(CSCO)
  
CSCO 120CCNA Introduction to Networks(3-4)
This course introduces architectures, models, protocols, and networking elements. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the nature and roles of protocols and services at the application, network, data link, and physical layers. Students learn IP addressing, foundational network security, and basic configurations for routers and switches.

CSCO 121CCNA Switching, Routing, and Wireless Essentials(3-4)
This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and switch for basic functionality. Students will configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, and single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 120 with a 'C' or better.

CSCO 130Fundamentals of Wireless LANs(4)
An intensive introduction to wireless LANs which focuses on the design, planning, implementation, operation and troubleshooting of wireless LANs. This hands-on lab-oriented course stresses documentation, design, and installation issues, as well as lab safety, on-the-job safety, and working effectively in a group environment. This course will help prepare students for the Cisco Wireless LAN Support Specialist Designation. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 121 with a 'C' or better. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CSCO 220CCNA Enterprise Networking, Security, and Automation(3-4)
This course describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for advanced functionality. Students will configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 121 with a 'C' or better.

CSCO 221CCNA WAN Fundamentals(3-4)
This course discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 220 with a 'C' or better.

CSCO 230Fundamentals of Network Security(4)
This course is designed to prepare students for entry level certification in network security. The course is an introduction to network security and overall security processes. This course teaches students to design and implement security solutions to reduce the risk of revenue loss and network vulnerability. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 121. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

CSCO 480CCNP Route(4)
This course prepares the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to use advanced IP addressing and routing in implementing scalability for routers connected to LANs and WANs. This course is recommended preparation for the CISCO CCNP Certification Exam, ROUTE. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 221 or instructor approval.

CSCO 482CCNP Switch(4)
This course prepares the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to implement scalable multilayer switched networks. This course includes topics and Campus Networks, describing and implementing advanced Spanning Tree concepts, VLANS and Inter-VLAN routing, High Availability, Wireless Client Access, Access Layer Voice concepts, and minimizing service Loss and Data Theft in a Campus Network. This course is recommended preparation for the CISCO CCNP Certification Exam, SWITCH. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 480 or instructor approval.

CSCO 484CCNP Troubleshoot(4)
This course teaches the student how to monitor and maintain complex, enterprise routed and switched IP networks. Skills learned include the planning and execution of regular network maintenance, as well as support and troubleshooting using technology-based processes and best practices, based on systematic and industry recognized approaches. Extensive labs emphasize hands-on learning and practice to reinforce troubleshooting techniques. This course is recommended preparation for the CISCO CCNP Certification Exam, TSHOOT. Prerequisite: Must have completed CSCO 480 and CSCO 482.

DAN 188Choreography I: Improvisation for Composition(2)
An introduction to the creative process of dance making using improvisation. Unlimited repeatability.

Drafting and Design(DFT)
  
DFT 100Basic Drafting Principles(1-4)
An introduction to manual drafting procedures including lettering; geometric constructions; orthographic projection; dimensioning sections; auxiliary views; and metric, architectural, and engineering techniques.

Diesel Technology(DT)
  
DT 100Shop Practices(0.5-4)
An introduction to hand tool identification and proper use, shop safety, and other topics including screw thread, hydraulic hose, and fitting identification. Also covers measuring devices. Prerequisite: Must have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 101Basic Diesel Engines(1-6)
A review of basic engine operation with an emphasis on operating principles, nomenclature, components, and design, and terminology. May be repeated up to 18 credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and a 10-hour OSHA course, and a grade of 'C' or higher in all previous DT or IT courses or have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 102Basic Vehicle Electronics(1-9)
A lecture and laboratory course study of AC and DC electricity as used in mobile equipment. Emphasis on charging systems, starting systems, lighting systems, and wiring diagrams. Troubleshooting and repairing of electrical components, electronic controls systems, and voltage drops analysis will be covered. May be taught in modules. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and a 10-hour OSHA course, and a grade of 'C' or higher in all previous DT or IT courses or have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 105Mobile Air Conditioning(1-5)
A lecture and laboratory course covering heating and refrigeration theory. Includes heating and air conditioning components, control systems, service evacuation, charging, overhaul, and replacement of major components. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and a 10-hour OSHA course, and a grade of 'C' or higher in all previous DT or IT courses or have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 106Heavy Duty Transmissions and Power Trains(1-8)
The theory and operation of heavy equipment power trains will be covered in detail with emphasis on power shift transmissions. Students will become familiar with driveline angle calculations, gear ratios, clutches, differentials, and transmission electronic control systems. May be repeated up to eight credits. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and a 10-hour OSHA course, and a grade of 'C' or higher in all previous DT or IT courses or have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 113Hydraulics I(3)
Introduces basic hydraulic systems through component recognition, circuit reading, and practical application focused on hazard recognition. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 114Hydraulics II(3)
Explains the function, operation, and application of components in a hydraulic system. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 115Hydraulics III(1.5)
Explains the testing and troubleshooting of hydraulic system components using leak path analysis. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 116Hydraulics IV(1.5)
Hydraulics IV will explain the testing and troubleshooting of the components in a hydraulic system in circuit using leak path analysis. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 118Electrics I(3)
An introductory course. The first in a series of courses to study electricity as related to mobile heavy equipment. Basic DC and AC electricity is covered in theory and reinforced with laboratory experiments. Ohm's Law, magnetism, and electrical component and system identification are covered. Electrical safety and hazard recognition are emphasized. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 119Electrics II(3)
The second in a series of electrical courses emphasizing mobile heavy equipment electrical systems. Electrical component disassembly, testing, and maintenance are covered. Lighting, relays, circuit breakers, wiring diagrams, and battery testing are discussed and reinforced through laboratory work. Electrical safety and hazard recognition are also covered. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 201Diesel Brakes and Pneumatics(2.5)
The principles of pneumatic brake systems are discussed in detail, with emphasis on cam-operated brakes. Pneumatic brake valves, schematic drawings, and foundation brake troubleshooting will be included in this technical course. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and a 10-hour OSHA course, and a grade of 'C' or higher in all previous DT or IT courses or have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 202Diesel Fuel Systems and Troubleshooting(1-6)
The theory and operation of diesel fuel injection systems will include Cummins PT, Caterpillar, Detroit Diesel, and Robert Bosch fuel systems. Governor operation and fuel system troubleshooting will be discussed. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 203Diesel Shop Management(1.5)
Designed to give students experience in the management of an equipment repair shop. Each student is required to estimate repair orders, calculate taxes, and deal with customers and employees. The course objectively evaluates what is needed to operate an equipment repair business. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 215Electronic Diesel Engines(1-9)
Designed to give individuals knowledge of electronic diesel engine controls as they apply to major diesel engine manufacturers. Emphasis is placed on engine sensors, electronic injection systems, and engine operating systems. No prerequisite but students having experience with diesel engines and basic electronics will find it helpful. Course may be taught in modules. Prerequisite: Must have completed DT 100 and DT 101 and DT 102 and a 10-hour OSHA course, and a grade of 'C' or higher in all previous DT or IT courses or have been accepted into the Diesel Technology Program. This course cannot be used for an Associate of Arts (A.A.), Associate of Science (A.S.), Bachelor of Arts (B.A.), or Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree, and may not be transferable for other baccalaureate degrees in Nevada.

DT 299Special Topics in Diesel Mechanics(1-10)
A special topics course in Diesel Technology to serve a variety of needs. Topics are determined by the course instructor. Unlimited repeatability.

Early Childhood Education(ECE)
  
ECE 121Parent Caregiver Relationships(1)
A course designed for child development students in which they can acquire various communication skills to enhance parent/caregiver relationships. Covers interpersonal communication, listening skills, and cooperative problem solving. Newsletters, parent conferences, phone conversations, record keeping, and student data folders will be addressed.

ECE 123Health and Nutrition for Young Children(1)
A study of young children concerning physical development, nutrition, health, safety, and childhood illnesses and diseases. Skills developed in selecting safe equipment, evaluating environments, and ensuring good health routines.

ECE 126Social and Emotional Development for Infants and Toddlers(3)
Study of effective development in infancy and toddlerhood. Emphasis is placed on experiences and techniques or use in the home and child care setting which will foster self-concept and social interactions for children from birth to three years of age.

ECE 127Role of Play for Infants and Toddlers(1-3)
Study of the role of play as it affects the social, emotional, and physical and intellectual growth and development of infants and toddlers.

ECE 130Infancy(3)
Course studies social, emotional, language, and sensorimotor development in infancy. Emphasis is placed on facilitating optimum infant and toddler development.

ECE 151Math in the Preschool Curriculum(1)
Activities and materials for developing mathematics readiness in the preschool.

ECE 152Science in the Preschool Curriculum(1)
Activities and materials for teaching science in the preschool.

ECE 154Literature for Preschool Children(1)
Survey of books for use with preschool children. Techniques of storytelling and reading to children.

ECE 156Music in the Preschool Curriculum(1)
Activities and materials for teaching music in the preschool. Songs, dances, and rhythm activities for use with preschool children.

ECE 157Art in the Preschool Curriculum(1)
Activities and materials for teaching art in the preschool. Emphasis on developing creativity and enjoyment of art through a wide range of materials and activities.

ECE 158Activities for Physical Development in Young Children(1)
Activities, materials, and equipment for developing gross motor coordination in preschool children including individual, small group, and large group activities for both indoor and outdoor use.

ECE 161Social Studies and the Young Child(1)
Emphasizes activities and materials for teaching social studies in the preschool. Drawn from anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and psychology. (Formerly ECE 161, Social Studies in the Preschool Curriculum)

ECE 167Child Abuse and Neglect(1)
Provides the opportunity for students to learn the legal definitions, symptoms, causes, and reporting procedures of child abuse and neglect. The class will include discussion of the roles and responsibilities of community agencies such as law enforcement, social services, child care personnel, medical and/or psychosocial professionals.

ECE 168Infectious Diseases and First Aid in Child Care(1)
Provides information about infectious diseases and first-aid measures in child care settings. Course content will include recognizing communicable and acute illnesses, management of accidents and injuries, preventive measures, health education, current research, and community resources.

ECE 190Professionalism in Early Care and Education(3)
Focuses on professional issues in Early Childhood Education including ethical guidelines and other professional guidelines and standards related to practice; professional organizations and activities; principles of effective leadership and advocacy for young children and for the profession; and relevant public policy at the local, state, and national levels.

ECE 198Special Topics in Early Childhood Education(0.5-6)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of subjects in Child Development. Class is variable in credit depending on class content and number of hours required. Unlimited repeatability.

ECE 200The Exceptional Child(3)
This course focuses on the characteristics, training, and educational needs of children with disabilities including children who are gifted. It explores the existing educational agencies, programs, and instructional methods designed for children with disabilities.

ECE 204Principles of Child Guidance(3)
A study of effective communication with children in guiding behavior. Emphasis will be placed on techniques which help children build positive self-concepts and individual strengths within the context of appropriate limits and discipline. The study includes uses of direct and indirect guidance techniques as well as introduction to guidance systems.

ECE 210Observation, Documentation, & Assessment of Young Children(3)
This course focuses on how to observe, document, and assess the growth and development of young children in early care and education settings. Students learn and practice a variety of appropriate observation techniques, documentation methods, and assessment strategies and tools. Students are introduced to the goals, benefits, and uses of assessment for young children. Confidentiality and assessment partnerships with families and other professionals are also explored. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 200 and ECE 204 and ECE 250 and ECE 251. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 200 and ECE 204 and ECE 250 and ECE 251.

ECE 231Preschool Practicum: Early Childhood Lab(6)
Working in a preschool setting with young children under the supervision of a master teacher, planning and implementing activities. Practicum will normally be taken during the final year of the child development program. Law requires a TB test prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250 and ECE 251 and ECE 262.

ECE 232Practicum: Infant and Toddler(3-4)
The student works directly with infants or toddlers in a supervised facility. The student is responsible for the environment, activities, and routine of the children, and reports and evaluates the experiences with the practicum supervisor. Prerequisite: Must be a declared ECE infant/toddler major. Instructor permission required.

ECE 235Adapting Curricula for Young Children with Special Needs(3)
This course focuses on adapting typical early childhood curricula to meet the needs of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with special needs. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 200 and ECE 250. Prerequisite: PR: Must have completed ECE 200 and ECE 250.

ECE 250Introduction to Early Childhood Education(3)
Introduces students to early childhood education. Course deals with the total preschool program including types, objectives, philosophy, curriculum, physical plant, and equipment, as these aspects of the program relate to the needs and interests of the preschool child.

ECE 251Curriculum in Early Childhood Education(3)
This course will consist of methods of planning and teaching curriculum for children three to five years old. Included will be curriculum development, children's play, lesson planning, and daily scheduling. Emphasis on art, science, literature, music, language, blocks, dramatic play, etc. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250.

ECE 252Infant/Toddler Curriculum(3)
Students will learn a variety of theories and apply them to the design of curriculum appropriate for infants and toddlers up to three years old, taking into account stages of physical, social, emotional, cognitive, and language development. Students will learn and utilize best practice in the curriculum planning to include routines, individualized curriculum, and care giving relationships.

ECE 262Early Language and Literacy Development(3)
Course focuses on the four areas of Language Arts: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Through a hands-on and interactive approach, students will explore the process of combining quality practices with specific materials and strategies focused on language and literacy development. In addition, students will examine the fundamentals of oral language and literacy-rich environments supported by the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that are predictive of later success in learning to read and write. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250.

ECE 441Play Theory, Creativity, & Aesthetics in ECE(3)
This course will focus on current theories of play interpretation, examination of the nature of creative expression, and use of materials and activities to support the aesthetic domain of young children. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250 and ECE 251 and ECE 262. Prerequisite: Must have completed ECE 250 and ECE 251 and ECE 262.

ECE 493Supervised Internship in ECE(1-12)
Working in a preschool setting with young children under the supervision of a master teacher, planning and implementing activities. Practicum will normally be taken during the final year of the child development program. Law requires a TB test prior to enrollment. Prerequisite: Must have completed the ECE AA and be authorized to student teach in ECE by the Teacher Education Committee by applying by Sept. 15 or Feb. 15 the preceding semester.

Economics(ECON)
  
ECON 101National/Global Economics and Financial Literacy(1)
Study of the basics of national and global markets. Discussion and analysis of financial literacy components.

ECON 102Principles of Microeconomics(3)
Study of the causes and effects of individuals' choices among alternative uses of scarce resources. Topics include supply and demand analysis, price determination, theories of various market structures, competition and coordination, labor, the role of profit and interest, and government involvement in the economy.

ECON 103Principles of Macroeconomics(3)
Basic price and quantity relationships, study of monetary systems and policy, inflation, production and growth, recession, unemployment, fiscal policy, supply and demand perspectives, international exchange, and governmental-market relationships.

ECON 104Current Economic Issues(3)
Analysis of current economic issues and their relevance to individuals in their roles as consumers, workers, businessmen, and voters. Economic theories and concepts are utilized in explaining important social interaction relating to such topics as medical care, anti-trust policy, price controls, drug prohibition, environmentalism, tax policy, public debt, and income distribution.

ECON 261Principles of Statistics I(3)
This course emphasizes the application of statistical methods for prediction and decision making in economics and management. This course will cover basic concepts in descriptive and inferential statistics. This course provides tools and techniques needed for students to design and implement empirically managerial and economic studies, to interpret and evaluate estimation results and justify conclusions by focusing on probability distributions and theory, data presentation and analysis, regression analysis and hypothesis testing.

ECON 295Special Topics in Economics(1-3)
Various short courses and workshops covering a variety of topics. This course will be variable credit of one-to-three credits depending on the course content and number of hours required. The course may be repeated for up to six credits.

ECON 307Environmental Economics(3)
An application of the principles of marginal analysis and economic reasoning to the environment. Differing perspectives on issues relating to ownership, property rights, preservation incentives under different scenarios, the Coarse theorem, trade-offs among human values, distributional effects of varying uses of scarce resources, and differing public policy issues. Prerequisite: Must have completed an associate's degree.

ECON 365Labor Economics(3)
An application of economic theory relating to labor issues. Topics include determination of wage and employment levels, worker cartels, fringe benefits, subsistence wages, minimum wage laws, living wage laws, unemployment compensation, fairness in wage distribution, the division of labor, and tenure systems. Prerequisite: Must have completed an associate's degree.

Education Career and Technical(EDCT)
  
EDCT 439General Methods of Teaching Career and Technical Education(3)
Designed for direct involvement in solving teaching and learning problems in career and technology education and occupational-vocational education. Emphasis is placed upon developing appropriate strategies for managing the classroom and occupational/industrial laboratory environment. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program or Business/Industry Endorsement. Corequisite: EDSC 315 or Business/Industry Endorsement.

EDCT 447Curriculum Development in Career and Technical Education(3)
Course will provide students the opportunity to research and develop curriculum dealing with content and procedures for career and technical education programs.

EDCT 463Teaching Secondary Business Education(3)
Designed for students who intend to pursue a career in teaching business subjects at the high school level. The major purpose of the course is to familiarize the student with the curriculum materials and teaching strategies which are unique to teaching business subjects. Business education is explored through the development of curricular materials and instruction procedures, including assessment and evaluation procedures. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into Teacher Education Program and be enrolled in EDSC 315.

EDCT 471Career and Technical Student Organizations(3)
Designed for students who intend to pursue a career teaching in the field of career and technical education at the middle/high school level. Familiarizes students with the benefits of student organizations and how to organize and manage a student organization in their particular field. Satisfies one of the requirements for the business and industry endorsement.

EDCT 490Cooperative Career and Technical Programs(3)
Provides students with an understanding of the role, organization, and implementation of cooperative and applied or work-based vocational programs.

Education Elementary(EDEL)
  
EDEL 311Elementary Methods Practicum I(1-3)
The first in a sequence of clinical and field experience courses. Students participate in field experiences and then reflect on what they have observed and learned. Students will spend approximately 15 hours observing in the public schools. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in EDU 250.

EDEL 313Elementary Methods Practicum II(1-3)
The second in a sequence of clinical and field experiences. Students will spend approximately 25 hours observing in the public schools. The portfolio and admission process is explained. May be taken two different semesters. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in EDUC 406.

EDEL 315Elementary Methods Practicum III(1-3)
The third in a sequence of clinical field experiences. Students will spend 30 to 60 hours observing and teaching in public schools. May be repeated up to six credits. [S/U] Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be enrolled in EDEL 433 or EDEL 443 or EDEL 453 or EDRL 442 or EDRL 443.

EDEL 331Teaching Elementary School Art(3)
Art education in the elementary schools. Meets state licensing requirements. Prerequisite: Must have completed ENG 102 and MATH 120 and EDU 250.

EDEL 433Methods for Teaching PK-8 Mathematics(3)
Course prepares prospective elementary teachers in the area of mathematics education. Students in this course will explore cognitive theories of development, methods, materials, and content of mathematics in the elementary grades. Curriculum changes that have taken place and current research in the area of mathematics education will be explored. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be enrolled in EDEL315.

EDEL 443Methods for Teaching PK-8 Science(3)
Course provides pre-service teachers with the theory, research, and best classroom practice related to science education. Students will be introduced to some of the materials, methods, and reasons for helping elementary children understand, perform, and appreciate science. Students will analyze the behavior of model teachers in elementary school classrooms and apply their acquired knowledge and skills by teaching elementary age students. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Teacher Education Program and have completed EDU 214 and be enrolled in EDEL 315.

EDEL 453Methods Teaching PK-8 Social Studies(3)
Course focuses on integrating a number of subject areas into the curriculum. Explores the scope and sequences of understandings, attitudes, and skills taught in elementary social studies programs. Examines various methodologies used. A variety of teaching strategies will be explained and demonstrated for work with a diverse array of students in society. Prerequisite: Must have been admitted into the Teacher Education Program and be enrolled in EDEL315.

EDEL 483Elementary Supervised Teaching Internship(1-16)
Sours: https://www.gbcnv.edu/cgi-bin/schedule/catalog_preprint.cgi

GBC Catalogs

Catalog page title graphic.

Which Catalog to Use

Current GBC Catalog graphic.The 2021-2022 Catalog.

Addendums to the 2021-2022 Catalog

Additions or changes to the 2021-2022 Catalog:

Catalog Information

Requirements for degrees and certificates can change from catalog to catalog. Typically, you can choose to abide by the requirements in the catalog effective at the time you first enrolled at GBC or the catalog effective the year you graduate. Exceptions are as follows:

  • The catalog referenced for a Bachelor's Degree may not be more than 10 years old.
  • The catalog referenced for an Associate Degree or Certificate of Achievement may not be more than 6 years old.
  • Catalogs may not be combined. Only one may be selected.

To view the catalog PDFs, you will need the Adobe Reader plugin installed on your web browser. It is available free at the Adobe website

For More Information Contact

Great Basin College
1500 College Parkway
Elko, Nevada 89801 (USA)
Phone: (775) 738-8493

Why Great Basin College

Great Basin College wants to be your choice for higher education. GBC offers associate and baccalaureate level instruction in career and technical education and academic areas. About 4,000 students are enrolled annually online from across the country and on campuses and centers across 86,500 square miles, two time zones, and ten of Nevada’s largest counties. We border Arizona, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and California. We are GBC!

Sours: https://www.gbcnv.edu/catalog/
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Departments, Subjects, and Courses at GBC

GBC Subjects graphic

Click on a subject title to see a list of relevant courses offered. The list will include regular, recurring courses from the GBC catalog. Not all courses are offered every semester, and not all courses listed in the current Class Schedule are listed here. For a current list of class offerings, go to the MyGBC Self-Service Center and use the links in the GBC Class Search box. For Department contact information, click here.

For More Information Contact

Great Basin College 
1500 College Parkway 
Elko, Nevada (USA) 89801 

Why Great Basin College

Great Basin College wants to be your choice for higher education. GBC offers associate and baccalaureate level instruction in career and technical education and academic areas. About 4,000 students are enrolled annually online from across the country and on campuses and centers across 86,500 square miles, two time zones, and ten of Nevada’s largest counties. We border Arizona, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, and California. We are GBC!

Sours: https://www.gbcnv.edu/academics/subjects.html
GREAT BASIN COLLEGE_by THS-Visuals Motion Pictures


HIST 101 U.S. History to 1877 (3 credits)
Survey of U.S. political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development from Colonial Times through Reconstruction. When taken with HIST 102 or 217, class satisfies the United States and Nevada Constitution requirement.

Current Offerings


HIST 102 U.S. History Since 1877 (3 credits)
Survey of U.S. political, social, economic, diplomatic, and cultural development from 1877 to the present. Includes examination of Nevada Constitution and, when taken with HIST 101, satisfies the U.S. and Nevada Constitution requirement.

Current Offerings


HIST 105 European Civilization I to 1648 (3 credits)
Survey of the development of Western civilization from the dawn of human history to 1648.

Current Offerings


HIST 106 European Civilization since 1648 (3 credits)
Survey of the development of Western civilization from 1648 to the present.

Current Offerings


HIST 208 World History I (3 credits)
Survey of world civilizations to 1600. Examines societies, cultures, and issues relative to Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East and Oceania.

Current Offerings


HIST 209 World History II (3 credits)
Survey of world civilizations since 1600. Examines historical societies, cultures, and issues relative to Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, the Middle East, and Oceania.

Current Offerings


HIST 217 Nevada History (3 credits)
Nevada history from early exploration to the present. Includes examination of the Nevada Constitution and satisfies the Nevada Constitution requirement.

Current Offerings


HIST 247 Introduction to the History of Mexico (3 credits)
A review of pre-Columbian, Colonial, and Mexican national history with emphasis on culture and politics.

Current Offerings


HIST 295 Special Topics in History (1-3 credits)
Course may utilize special emphasis topics/instructors or be offered as an individualized study format with directed readings. Classes will usually mirror offerings at other NSHE institutions. Unlimited repeatability.

Current Offerings


HIST 303 Worlds of Islam (3 credits)
Introduces the theology and culture of early Islam. Examines the history of the 'rightly guided caliphs' era, the Umayyad and Abbasid periods, the Ottoman dynasty and others. Explores recent regional variations in Islam.

Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one lower-division HIST course or instructor approval.

Current Offerings


HIST 417C The West as National Experience (3 credits)
Historical development of the American West utilized to examine contemporary issues of resources and ownership, demographic change, and national myth-making.

Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one lower-division HIST course or instructor approval.

Current Offerings


HIST 441 American Environmental History (3 credits)
Explores the relationships between human beings and the physical environment on the North American continent. Examines how different cultural groups have used and transformed the continent. Examines the ebb and flow of environmental consciousness from its roots in the nineteenth century to the rise of environmentalism in the twentieth century.

Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one lower-division HIST course or instructor approval.

Current Offerings


HIST 458 Roman Civilization (3 credits)
Analyzes all aspects of Roman history from earliest times to the late antique period, with central attention to the politics and society of the later Republic and how Rome became the monarchy of the Caesars.

Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one lower-division HIST course or instructor approval.

Current Offerings


HIST 478B Islamic and Middle Eastern History since 1750 (3 credits)
An examination of the Middle East from the 18th century to recent times. The predominant focus will be on how the indigenous leadership and peoples of the region grappled with the challenges posed by the advent of the modern world.

Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one lower-division HIST course or instructor approval.

Current Offerings


HIST 498 Advanced Historical Studies (1-3 credits)
Course may utilize special emphasis topics or be offered as an individualized study format with directed readings. May be repeated up to nine credits.

Prerequisite: Must have completed 40 or more credits including one lower-division HIST course or instructor approval.

Current Offerings
Sours: https://www.gbcnv.edu/cgi-bin/schedule/list_courses_first.cgi?HIST+History

Course college great catalog basin



BUS 101 Introduction to Business (3 credits)
A one-semester survey course covering business organization, operation, and management, designed to orient the student to the field of business.

Current Offerings


BUS 102 Introduction to Entrepreneurship (3 credits)
Course serves as the foundation for the GBC Associate of Applied Science--Entrepreneurship Emphasis degree program. Introduces techniques, principles, and challenges facing today's entrepreneurs using practical examples.

Class Attribute: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree.

Current Offerings


BUS 110 Human Relations for Employment (1-3 credits)
Introduces students to the principles and skills of effective communication in business and professional settings. It provides information on how to communicate with superiors, co-workers, subordinates, clients, and customers. Three-credit course includes a computation component. Repeatable up to a total of three credits.

Class Attribute: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree.

Current Offerings


BUS 117 Business Calculations and Methods (3 credits)
Fundamental arithmetic processes applied to business activities and applications. Including discounts, markups, payroll, interest, annuities, present value of money, depreciation, tax computations, business statistics, and general application of mathematics for planning and problem solving using algebraic equations/graphics and other basic forecasting techniques.

Class Attribute: Non-transferable for an NSHE baccalaureate degree.

Current Offerings


BUS 198 Special Topics in Business (1-3 credits)
Selected business topics offered for general interest and the business community. Not a required course. May be repeated for credit if topics are different.

Current Offerings


BUS 201 Entrepreneurship II (3 credits)
Extends techniques, principles, and challenges facing today's aspiring entrepreneurs using practical examples. The major project for the course is the preparation of a useful business plan, instructions on acquiring financing, and explanations of other business startup activities, especially, setting up marketing programs and strategic/tactical plans. Recommended prerequisite: BUS 102 or MGT 103.

Prerequisite: Must have completed BUS 101 or BUS 102.

Current Offerings


BUS 273 Business Law I (3 credits)
A study of the origin, philosophy, and nature of law and procedures including court systems, contracts, agency, partnerships, sales, criminal law, and torts.

Current Offerings


BUS 274 Business Law II (3 credits)
A continuation of BUS 273. Includes a study of corporation law, property, secured transactions, negotiable instruments, insurance, and bankruptcy.

Prerequisite: Must have completed BUS 273.

Current Offerings


BUS 275 Foundations of International Business (3 credits)
Introduces students to the impact of geography, the Internet, and different environments in which international business is conducted and the uncontrollable forces at work in all business environments. Topics discussed will include the importance of international organizations, the international monetary system, and the relevance of certain aspects of international business to managers and business people.

Current Offerings
Sours: https://www.gbcnv.edu/cgi-bin/schedule/list_courses_first.cgi?BUS+Business
Great Basin College

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