Youtube sound of silence lyrics

Youtube sound of silence lyrics DEFAULT

1964. Lights out. A confession in the dark, a longtime faithful friend. Meanwhile, a jet of water flows from a tap deliberately left open. A waste that we forgive, because starting from these ingredients the young Paul Simon wrote The Sound of Silence, a song that more than half a century later will still be sadly valid today. He, locked in the bathroom with pen and paper, cannot imagine that in 2020s we would still talk about his dialogue with the most intimate part of himself, opened by one of the most beautiful opening words ever written.

The song, which originally was named The Sounds of Silence, was initially recorded as an acoustic piece and included on Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., the first album Simon records with Art Garfunkel for Columbia Records. It could have also been the last, because it turned out to be a daunting flop. The duo splits: Simon leaves for London to seek his fortune as a soloist, while Garfunkel resumes his university studies. Then the unexpected happens: Tom Wilson, the producer of the record company, discovers that the radios are playing the song with an unexpected frequency in some parts of the United States. Without letting the duo know, Wilson reinvents it with the addition of drums and electric guitar, transforming it into a folk rock piece that will soon climb the charts. Simon and Garfunkel reunite and the rest is history.

It is curious, however, how over time the acoustic version has remained the best known and most touching, reaching its highest point in the 1981 free concert in Central Park, when the two musicians, divided for years, returned together to astonish a crowd of 500,000 people.

Simon is fond of oxymorons; Garfunkel himself explains it, and he knows him well. This rhetorical figure, always loved by poets, consists in the juxtaposition of two or more words that normally deny each other. But it can happen, at times, that this contrast exposes a perfectly sensible expression, an image that is difficult to evoke otherwise. “The sound of silence” is one of them, and it’s safe to bet that someone who suffers from tinnitus would be ready to confirm it. Joking aside, however one understands it, silence has a voice: it can be a sweet whisper, like when one embraces a long-sought solitude; or he can cry out, if being alone is a curse from which one cannot break free. Instead, the silence that Paul Simon thought on that February day years ago is far more terrible and inhumane. And it speaks this way:

Hello darkness, my old friend
I’ve come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within the sound of silence

From the very first verses, what is the main theme of the track is addressed: incommunicability. Simon does not talk to a friend, but in the darkness of the room where he is writing. In fact, the vision he refers to seems like one of those dreams that you cannot tell anyone but yourself. A dream that is fixed in the mind and that awakening does not make you forget. Then the verse continues:

In restless dreams I walked alone
Narrow streets of cobblestone
‘Neath the halo of a street lamp
I turned my collar to the cold and damp
When my eyes were stabbed by the flash of a neon light
That split the night
And touched the sound of silence

The landscape Simon begins to describe is reminiscent of Dickens’ novels. There are no trees, meadows or rivers. It’s a cramped, claustrophobic world made of concrete and artificial lights. At one point, the calm of the night is attacked by a blinding glare, which reveals the presence of a flood of people:

And in the naked light I saw
Ten thousand people, maybe more
People talking without speaking
People hearing without listening
People writing songs that voices never share
And no one dared
Disturb the sound of silence

The pleasant silence that accompanied the walk of that lonely figure changes shape, turning into something distressing. Individuals, physically close to each other, are separated by the inability to communicate. They speak without expressing concepts or emotions, they listen absently. The domain of silence, in which only indistinct noises infiltrate, is absolute. Faced with this gruesome spectacle, the man loses his temper:

“Fools” said I, “You do not know
Silence like a cancer grows
Hear my words that I might teach you
Take my arms that I might reach you”
But my words like silent raindrops fell
And echoed
In the wells of silence

The attempt to establish a dialogue fails. There is no longer the hope of creating authentic bonds. The emptiness of silence sucks up the words, giving way to a general silence.

And the people bowed and prayed
To the neon god they made
And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the sign said: “The words of the prophets
Are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls”
And whisper’d in the sounds of silence

The mass has made its choice, which is realized in blind obedience … to what? To dogmas? To capitalism? To all the nonsense that propaganda fills our heads with? Simon undoubtedly had in mind the power of television and screens in general, capable of shaping new thoughts in people. Whatever aspect you want to give to this luminous divinity, the fate seems to be sealed: there will be no salvation for men until they spiritually unite in a chain of solidarity and pity, as the dramatic historical period we are experiencing teaches us.

Listening to this song is a strange experience, especially if we put it in the context of our days. On the one hand you feel lulled by the arpeggio and the light singing, on the other you have the feeling of being scolded, accused of not having listened to the warning and trying to change things. Indeed, the abyss of non-communication is today deeper than ever. Some more some less, we are all in it.

Rating: 4.3/5. From 50 votes.

Please wait...

Like this:

LikeLoading...

Correlati

Sours: https://auralcrave.com/en/2020/08/27/the-sound-of-silence-the-meaning-of-simon-and-garfunkels-masterpiece/

Simon & Garfunkel Songs - The Sound of Silence Lyrics

Simon & Garfunkel Songs - The Sound of Silence
Simon & Garfunkel - The Sound of Silence


Simon & Garfunkel - The Sound of Silence Lyrics and Youtube Music Videos

Album: Wednesday Morning, 3 AM
Released: 1966

The Sound of Silence Lyrics


Hello darkness, my old friend
I've come to talk with you again
Because a vision softly creeping
Left its seeds while I was sleeping
And the vision that was planted in my brain
Still remains
Within The Sound of Silence

In restless dreams I walked alone
Narrow streets of cobblestone
'Neath the halo of a street lamp
I turned my collar to the cold and damp
When my eyes were stabbed by the flash of a neon light
That split the night
And touched the sound of silence

And in the naked light I saw
Ten thousand people, maybe more
People talking without speaking
People hearing without listening
People writing songs that voices never share
And no one dared
Disturb the sound of silence

"Fools" said I
"You do not know, silence like a cancer grows
Hear my words that I might teach you
Take my arms that I might reach you"
But my words like silent raindrops fell
And echoed
In the wells of silence

And the people bowed and prayed
To the neon god they made
And the sign flashed out its warning
In the words that it was forming
And the signs said
"The words of the prophets are written on the subway walls
And tenement halls
And whisper'd in the sounds of silence

Writer/s: SIMON, PAUL
Publisher: Universal Music Publishing Group
Lyrics licensed and provided by LyricFind

The Sound of Silence Song Chart
  • The first recording was an acoustic version on Simon & Garfunkel's first album, Wednesday Morning, 3 AM, which was billed as "exciting new sounds in the folk tradition," and sold about 2000 copies. When the album tanked, Simon and Garfunkel split up. What they didn't know was that their record company had a plan. Trying to take advantage of the folk-rock movement, Columbia Records had producer Tom Wilson add electric instruments to the acoustic track. Simon and Garfunkel had no idea their acoustic song had been overdubbed with electric instruments, but it became a huge hit and got them back together. If Wilson had not reworked the song without their knowledge, Simon and Garfunkel probably would have gone their separate ways. When the song hit #1 in the States, Simon was in England and Garfunkel was at college.
  • Paul Simon was looking for a publishing deal when he presented this song to Tom Wilson at Columbia Records. Wilson thought it could work for a group called The Pilgrims, but Simon wanted to show him how it could work with two singers, so he and and Art Garfunkel sang it to the guys at Columbia Records, who were impressed with the duo and decided to sign them.
  • Paul Simon took six months to write the lyrics, which are about man's lack of communication with his fellow man. He averaged one line a day.
  • In an interview with Terry Gross of National Public Radio (NPR), Paul Simon explained how he wrote the song while working at his first job in music: "It was just when I was coming out of college. My job was to take the songs that this huge publishing company owned and go around to record companies and see if any of their artists wanted to record the songs. I worked for them for about six months and never got a song placed, but I did give them a couple of my songs because I felt so guilty about taking their money. Then I got into an argument with them and said, 'Look, I quit, and I'm not giving you my new song.' And the song that I had just written was 'The Sound of Silence.' I thought, 'I'll just publish it myself,' and from that point on I owned my own songs, so that was a lucky argument.

    I think about songs that it's not just what the words say but what the melody says and what the sound says. My thinking is that if you don't have the right melody, it really doesn't matter what you have to say, people don't hear it. They only are available to hear when the sound entrances and makes people open to the thought. Really the key to 'The Sound of Silence' is the simplicity of the melody and the words, which are youthful alienation. It's a young lyric, but not bad for a 21-year-old. It's not a sophisticated thought, but a thought that I gathered from some college reading material or something. It wasn't something that I was experiencing at some deep, profound level - nobody's listening to me, nobody's listening to anyone - it was a post-adolescent angst, but it had some level of truth to it and it resonated with millions of people. Largely because it had a simple and singable melody."
  • This was one of the songs Simon & Garfunkel performed in 1964 when they were starting out and playing the folk clubs in Greenwich Village. It was their first hit.
  • Paul Simon was often compared to Bob Dylan, who was also signed to Columbia Records, and while Simon has acknowledged Dylan's influence on "The Sound Of Silence," he was never trying to measure up to Dylan. Simon told Mojo in 2000: "I tried very hard not to be influenced by him, and that was hard. 'The Sound Of Silence', which I wrote when I was 21, I never would have wrote it were it not for Bob Dylan. Never, he was the first guy to come along in a serious way that wasn't a teen language song. I saw him as a major guy whose work I didn't want to imitate in the least."

    There is a Dylan connection on this song: The electric version was produced by Tom Wilson and finished by Bob Johnston, and both men had worked with Dylan. Wilson was Dylan's producer for about two years starting in 1963, and helped Dylan make the transition from acoustic folk to electric rock. Wilson went on to work with The Velvet Underground and later became a record company executive. Johnston was Dylan's producer until 1970.
  • This was used in the movie The Graduate. The film's director Mick Nichols put it on as a work track and was going to replace it, but as the film came together it became clear that the song was perfect for the film. Nichols didn't just use this song, but felt Simon & Garfunkel had a sound that fit the tone of the movie very well. They commissioned them to write "Mrs. Robinson" specifically for the movie, and also added "Scarborough Fair" and "April Come She Will" to the film.
  • This has a lot of meaning in the movie The Graduate. The lyrics refer to silence as a cancer, and if people in the movie had just been honest and not afraid to talk, all the messy things would not have happened. Problems can be solved only by honesty. (thanks, Stefan - Winona, MS)
  • Simon & Garfunkel did not write this about the Vietnam War, but by the time it became popular, the war was on and many people felt it made a powerful statement as an anti-war song.
  • In the US, this hit #1 on New Year's Day, 1966.
  • The opening line, "Hello darkness, my old friend," came from Simon's time as a boy when he would sing in the bathroom with the lights out, enjoying the acoustics from the tiles that provided a doo-wop reverb sound.
  • On February 23, 2003, Simon and Garfunkel reunited for the first time in 10 years to accept a lifetime achievement award and perform this at the opening of The Grammys. At the time, the US was preparing to invade Iraq, and while this could be heard as a political statement, Simon said it wasn't. He explained that they wanted to play this because it was their first hit.
  • At the Grammy Awards in 1967, Simon & Garfunkel were introduced by Dustin Hoffman, who made a name for himself when he starred in The Graduate. There was no host at The Grammys that year, so Hoffman was the first person seen when the show opened.
  • Despite its great popularity, Blender magazine voted this the 42nd worst song ever, remarking sardonically that "If Frasier Crane were a song, he would sound like this." The magazine's editor, Craig Marks, defended Blender's decision to include this much-loved song on their list, stating: "It's the freshman-poetry meaningfulness that got our goat, with self-important lyrics like 'hear my words that I might teach you', it's almost a parody of pretentious '60s folk-rock." The brief article on the song corresponding with this called the "hear my words" line "the most self-important... in rock history," and elaborated on Mark's remarks with: "Simon and Garfunkel thunder away in voices that suggest they're scowling and wagging their fingers as they sing. The overall experience is like being lectured on the meaning of life by a jumped-up freshman."
  • The band Gregorian covered this on their album Masters of Chant - as Gregorian chant. Nevermore also covered it on the album Dead Heart In A Dead World, and the German band Atrocity covered it on their 2000 album Gemini. As for their version's quality: Many people feel the band name was appropriate. (thanks, Brett - Edmonton, Canada, for above 2)
  • This was used in the movie Old School in a scene where Will Ferrell falls into a pool. (thanks, Joel Riley - Berkley, MI)
  • The Bachelors, a three-piece vocal group from Ireland, recorded this in 1966 and hit #3 in the UK with their version. Simon & Garfunkel's version was not released as a single in England. (thanks, Phil - Bolton, England)
  • This song was parodied on The Simpsons in the fifth season episode "Lady Bouvier's Lover." The whole episode is very similar to The Graduate, and The Simpsons version plays over the end credits, after Grandpa and Mrs. Bouvier have left the church much as Benjamin and Elaine do in the movie. (thanks, Judah - San Francisco, CA)
  • Paul Simon didn't always enjoy performing his older songs, as he had a hard time making connections to songs he had written decades earlier. This was a source of contention for the duo, since Art Garfunkel felt that many of their popular songs were still relevant, and their audience wanted to hear them. He explained in a 1993 interview with Paul Zollo: "I want 'The Sound Of Silence' to get angry at the end as if it's timeless. The impoverished are screaming, 'F--k this unfair system,' just like they've always screamed it. It's a timeless thing. It lives, if you can make it live, onstage tonight like it did when it was written in '64."
  • There has been only one cover version of this song to make the US Hot 100: a 1971 release by Peaches & Herb that made #100. Some other notable covers are an extended Metal version by Nevermore on their 2000 album Dead Heart in a Dead World, and a 1996 rendition by the Icelandic singer Emiliana Torrini.
  • Simon & Garfunkel performed this at Neil Young's Bridge School Benefit in 1993 with Eddie Van Halen backing them on guitar.
  • The heavy metal band Disturbed surprised their fans by covering this for their 2015 Immortalized album. Guitarist Dan Donegan said they didn't want to cover up singer David Draiman's vocal with "loud, aggressive, and distorted guitars" on their version. He added: "We wanted to showcase his vulnerability and take a leftfield approach. The strings and violins really deepen it. It's something that might shock people because we went down a new path altogether. We did what felt right and saw the vision through."

  • Sours: https://www.yt-lyrics.com/2016/01/simon-garfunkel-songs-sound-of-silence.html
    1. Samsung galaxy volume not working
    2. Martha stewart chocolate cupcake recipe
    3. The ups store vector logo
    4. Com google android gms ui

    Australia seem to have got the hang of Eurovision very quickly. Dami Im had long been our favourite for Eurovision, and SBS promptly delivered her. Now, she’s dropped her Eurovision track “Sound of Silence” and it’s looking like Dami is going straight in as a top 5 contender. The song is a mid-tempo ballad that shows off Dami’s magnificent vocal. The lyrics see Dami pine for an absent lover, with the “sound of silence” showing the longing. It also drops a handy reference to “Facetime” — how very Valentina!

    You can find the “Sound of Silence” lyrics below:

    Watch: “Sound of Silence” — Dami Im

    “Sound of Silence” lyrics — Dami Im

    Growing tired and weary, brown eyes
    Trying to feel your love through face time
    Symphonies of dreams and highlights,
    Caught up in this crazy fast life
    But baby, you’re not here with me

    And I keep calling, calling
    Keep calling, call…

    Now my heart awakes to the sound of silence
    And it beats to the sound of silence,
    And it beats to the sound of silence.
    Now my heart awakes to the sound of silence
    And it beats to the sound of silence,
    And it beats to the sound of silence.

    Getting hard to break through the madness,
    You’re not here, it never makes sense
    Tidal wave of tears are crashing,
    No one hear to save me drowning,
    ’cause baby, you’re not here with me

    And I keep calling, calling
    Keep calling, call…

    Now my heart awakes to the sound of silence
    And it beats to the sound of silence,
    And it beats to the sound of silence.
    Now my heart awakes to the sound of silence
    And it beats to the sound of silence,
    And it beats to the sound of silence

    I know I’m stronger and I’m capable,
    I know it’s all in my head, but I keep calling, calling
    Calling, calling…home

    Now my heart awakes to the sound of silence
    And it beats to the sound of silence, (silence)
    And it beats to the sound of silence.
    Now my heart awakes to the sound of silence
    And it beats to the sound of silence,
    And it beats to the sound of silence.

    Follow all of our Australia Eurovision news here

    Sours: https://wiwibloggs.com/2016/03/10/sound-of-silence-lyrics/131566/
    Simon \u0026 Garfunkel - The Sound of Silence (from The Concert in Central Park)
  • The first recording was an acoustic version on Simon & Garfunkel's first album, Wednesday Morning, 3 AM, which was billed as "exciting new sounds in the folk tradition," and sold about 2000 copies. When the album tanked, Paul Simon and Art Garfunkel split up. What they didn't know was that their record company had a plan. Trying to take advantage of the folk-rock movement, Columbia Records had producer Tom Wilson add electric instruments to the acoustic track, and released it as a single. Simon and Garfunkel had no idea their acoustic song had been overdubbed with electric instruments, but it became a huge hit and got them back together. Had Wilson not reworked the song without their knowledge, the duo probably would have gone their separate ways. When the song hit #1 in the States, Simon was in England and Garfunkel was at college.

  • Paul Simon was looking for a publishing deal when he presented this song to Tom Wilson at Columbia Records. Wilson thought it could work for a group called The Pilgrims, but Simon wanted to show him how it could work with two singers, so he and Art Garfunkel sang it to the guys at Columbia Records, who were impressed with the duo and decided to sign them.

  • Paul Simon took six months to write the lyrics, which are about man's lack of communication with his fellow man.

  • In an interview with Terry Gross of National Public Radio (NPR), Paul Simon explained how he wrote the song while working at his first job in music: "It was just when I was coming out of college. My job was to take the songs that this huge publishing company owned and go around to record companies and see if any of their artists wanted to record the songs. I worked for them for about six months and never got a song placed, but I did give them a couple of my songs because I felt so guilty about taking their money. Then I got into an argument with them and said, 'Look, I quit, and I'm not giving you my new song.' And the song that I had just written was 'The Sound of Silence.' I thought, 'I'll just publish it myself,' and from that point on I owned my own songs, so that was a lucky argument.

    I think about songs that it's not just what the words say but what the melody says and what the sound says. My thinking is that if you don't have the right melody, it really doesn't matter what you have to say, people don't hear it. They only are available to hear when the sound entrances and makes people open to the thought. Really the key to 'The Sound of Silence' is the simplicity of the melody and the words, which are youthful alienation. It's a young lyric, but not bad for a 21-year-old. It's not a sophisticated thought, but a thought that I gathered from some college reading material or something. It wasn't something that I was experiencing at some deep, profound level - nobody's listening to me, nobody's listening to anyone - it was a post-adolescent angst, but it had some level of truth to it and it resonated with millions of people. Largely because it had a simple and singable melody."

  • This was one of the songs Simon & Garfunkel performed in 1964 when they were starting out and playing the folk clubs in Greenwich Village. It was their first hit.

  • Paul Simon was often compared to Bob Dylan, who was also signed to Columbia Records, and while Simon has acknowledged Dylan's influence on "The Sound Of Silence," he was never trying to measure up to Dylan. Simon told Mojo in 2000: "I tried very hard not to be influenced by him, and that was hard. 'The Sound Of Silence', which I wrote when I was 21, I never would have wrote it were it not for Bob Dylan. Never, he was the first guy to come along in a serious way that wasn't a teen language song. I saw him as a major guy whose work I didn't want to imitate in the least."

    There is a Dylan connection on this song: The electric version was produced by Tom Wilson and finished by Bob Johnston, and both men had worked with Dylan. Wilson was Dylan's producer for about two years starting in 1963, and helped Dylan make the transition from acoustic folk to electric rock. Wilson went on to work with The Velvet Underground and later became a record company executive. Johnston was Dylan's producer until 1970.

  • This was used in the movie The Graduate. The film's director, Mike Nichols, put it on as a work track and was going to replace it, but as the film came together it became clear that the song was perfect for the film. Nichols didn't just use this song, but felt Simon & Garfunkel had a sound that fit the tone of the movie very well. They commissioned them to write "Mrs. Robinson" specifically for the movie, and also added "Scarborough Fair" and "April Come She Will" to the film.

  • This has a lot of meaning in the movie The Graduate. The lyrics refer to silence as a cancer, and if people in the movie had just been honest and not afraid to talk, all the messy things would not have happened. Problems can be solved only by honesty. >>

    Suggestion credit:
    Stefan - Winona, MS

  • Simon & Garfunkel did not write this about the Vietnam War, but by the time it became popular, the war was on and many people felt it made a powerful statement as an anti-war song.

  • In the US, this hit #1 on New Year's Day, 1966.

  • The opening line, "Hello darkness, my old friend," came from Simon's time as a boy when he would sing in the bathroom with the lights out, enjoying the acoustics from the tiles that provided a doo-wop reverb sound.

  • On February 23, 2003, Simon and Garfunkel reunited for the first time in 10 years to accept a lifetime achievement award and perform this at the opening of The Grammys. At the time, the US was preparing to invade Iraq, and while this could be heard as a political statement, Simon said it wasn't. He explained that they wanted to play this because it was their first hit.

  • At the Grammy Awards in 1967, Simon & Garfunkel were introduced by Dustin Hoffman, who made a name for himself when he starred in The Graduate. There was no host at The Grammys that year, so Hoffman was the first person seen when the show opened.

  • Despite its great popularity, Blender magazine voted this the 42nd worst song ever, remarking sardonically that "If Frasier Crane were a song, he would sound like this." The magazine's editor, Craig Marks, defended Blender's decision to include this much-loved song on their list, stating: "It's the freshman-poetry meaningfulness that got our goat, with self-important lyrics like 'hear my words that I might teach you', it's almost a parody of pretentious '60s folk-rock." The brief article on the song corresponding with this called the "hear my words" line "the most self-important... in rock history," and elaborated on Mark's remarks with: "Simon and Garfunkel thunder away in voices that suggest they're scowling and wagging their fingers as they sing. The overall experience is like being lectured on the meaning of life by a jumped-up freshman."

  • The band Gregorian covered this on their album Masters of Chant- as Gregorian chant. Nevermore also covered it on the album Dead Heart In A Dead World, and the German band Atrocity covered it on their 2000 album Gemini. As for their version's quality: Many people feel the band name was appropriate. >>

    Suggestion credit:
    Brett - Edmonton, Canada, for above 2

  • This was used in the movie Old Schoolin a scene where Will Ferrell falls into a pool. >>

    Suggestion credit:
    Joel Riley - Berkley, MI

  • The Bachelors, a three-piece vocal group from Ireland, recorded this in 1966 and hit #3 in the UK with their version. Simon & Garfunkel's version was not released as a single in England. >>

    Suggestion credit:
    Phil - Bolton, England

  • This song was parodied on The Simpsonsin the fifth season episode "Lady Bouvier's Lover." The whole episode is very similar to The Graduate, and The Simpsons version plays over the end credits, after Grandpa and Mrs. Bouvier have left the church much as Benjamin and Elaine do in the movie. >>

    Suggestion credit:
    Judah - San Francisco, CA

  • Paul Simon didn't always enjoy performing his older songs, as he had a hard time making connections to songs he had written decades earlier. This was a source of contention for the duo, since Art Garfunkel felt that many of their popular songs were still relevant, and their audience wanted to hear them. Garfunkel explained in a 1993 interview with Paul Zollo: "I want 'The Sound Of Silence' to get angry at the end as if it's timeless. The impoverished are screaming, 'F--k this unfair system,' just like they've always screamed it. It's a timeless thing. It lives, if you can make it live, onstage tonight like it did when it was written in '64."

  • Until Disturbed released their hit cover in 2015, there had been only one cover version of this song to make the US Hot 100: a 1971 release by Peaches & Herb that made #100. Some other notable covers are an extended Metal version by Nevermore on their 2000 album Dead Heart in a Dead World, and a 1996 rendition by the Icelandic singer Emiliana Torrini.

  • Simon & Garfunkel performed this at Neil Young's Bridge School Benefit in 1993 with Eddie Van Halen backing them on guitar.

  • The heavy metal band Disturbed surprised their fans by covering this for their 2015 Immortalized album. Guitarist Dan Donegan said they didn't want to cover up singer David Draiman's vocal with "loud, aggressive, and distorted guitars" on their version. He added: "We wanted to showcase his vulnerability and take a leftfield approach. The strings and violins really deepen it. It's something that might shock people because we went down a new path altogether. We did what felt right and saw the vision through."

  • Released as a single, Disturbed's cover became their highest-charting song on the Hot 100, peaking at #42. Draiman told The Wall Street Journal that he "couldn't be more flabbergasted" by the success of their cover. He added: "[It's a song] that my parents can play for their friends with pride without having to warn them not to be frightened ahead of time. I have fans saying, 'Finally, me and my mom can actually agree on music for once!'"

  • Paul Simon endorsed Disturbed's version after the band delivered a performance of his tune during their March 28, 2016 appearance on Conan. Simon sent David Draiman an email shortly after, saying, "Really powerful performance on Conan the other day. First time I'd seen you do it live. Nice. Thanks."

  • This appears as a running joke throughout the TV series Arrested Development to reflect the inner turmoil of Gob Bluth (Will Arnett).

  • In April 2016, this peaked at #6 on the Billboard Hot Rock Songs chart and #2 on the Rock Streaming Songs chart largely thanks to the popular "Sad Affleck" meme. A few weeks earlier, Ben Affleck and Henry Cavill were interviewed about their film Batman V Superman: Dawn of Justice and were asked about its mediocre reviews. Affleck's solemn silence inspired a YouTuber to edit the video with "The Sound of Silence" soundtracking his reaction.

  • Paul Simon pitched the folk singer Odetta an early acoustic version of this song in late 1964/early 1965. She declined it.

  • Sours: https://www.songfacts.com/facts/simon-garfunkel/the-sound-of-silence

    Lyrics of youtube sound silence

    The Sound of Silence

    Song by Simon & Garfunkel

    For other uses, see The Sound of Silence (disambiguation).

    "The Sound of Silence", originally "The Sounds of Silence", is a song by the American music duo Simon & Garfunkel. The song was written by Paul Simon over several months in 1963 and 1964. A studio audition led to the duo signing a record deal with Columbia Records, and the original acoustic version of the song was recorded in March 1964 at Columbia Studios in New York City and included on their debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M.. Released on October 19, 1964,[2] the album was a commercial failure and led to the duo disbanding; Simon returned to England, and Art Garfunkel to his studies at Columbia University.

    In 1965, the song began to attract airplay at radio stations in Boston and throughout Florida. The growing airplay led Tom Wilson, the song's producer, to remix the track, overdubbing electric instruments and drums. This remixed version was released as a single in September 1965. Simon & Garfunkel were not informed of the song's remix until after its release. The song hit No. 1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for the week ending January 1, 1966, leading the duo to reunite and hastily record their second album, which Columbia titled Sounds of Silence in an attempt to capitalize on the song's success. The remixed single version of the song was included on this follow-up album.

    It was featured in the 1967 film The Graduate and was included on the film's soundtrack album. It was additionally released on the Mrs. RobinsonEP in 1968, along with three other songs from the film: "Mrs. Robinson", "April Come She Will" and "Scarborough Fair/Canticle". The song was a top-ten hit in multiple countries worldwide, among them Australia, Austria, West Germany, Japan and the Netherlands. Generally considered a classic folk rock song, the song was added to the National Recording Registry in the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically important" in 2012, along with the rest of the Sounds of Silence album. Originally titled "The Sounds of Silence" on the album Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., the song was included in later compilations, beginning with the 1972 compilation album Simon and Garfunkel's Greatest Hits.[3]

    Background[edit]

    Origin and original recording[edit]

    Simon and Garfunkel had become interested in folk music and the growing counterculture movement separately in the early 1960s. Having performed together previously under the name Tom and Jerry in the late 1950s, their partnership had since dissolved when they began attending college. In 1963, they regrouped and began performing Simon's original compositions locally in Queens. They billed themselves "Kane & Garr", after old recording pseudonyms, and signed up for Gerde's Folk City, a Greenwich Village club that hosted Monday night performances. In September 1963, the duo performed three new songs, among them "The Sound of Silence", getting the attention of Columbia Records producer Tom Wilson, a young African-American jazz musician who was also helping to guide Bob Dylan's transition from folk to rock.[5] Simon convinced Wilson to let him and his partner have a studio audition; their performance of "The Sound of Silence" got the duo signed to Columbia.

    The song's origin and basis are unclear, with some thinking that the song commented on the Assassination of John F. Kennedy, as the song was recorded three months after the assassination, though Simon & Garfunkel had performed the song live as Kane & Garr two months before the assassination.[8] Simon wrote "The Sound of Silence" when he was 21 years old,[9][10] with Simon explaining that the song was written in his bathroom, where he turned off the lights to better concentrate.[11] "The main thing about playing the guitar, though, was that I was able to sit by myself and play and dream. And I was always happy doing that. I used to go off in the bathroom, because the bathroom had tiles, so it was a slight echo chamber. I'd turn on the faucet so that water would run (I like that sound, it's very soothing to me) and I'd play. In the dark. 'Hello darkness, my old friend / I've come to talk with you again.'"[12] According to Garfunkel, the song was first developed in November, but Simon took three months to perfect the lyrics, which he claims were entirely written on February 19, 1964. Garfunkel, introducing the song at a live performance (with Simon) in Harlem, June 1966, summed up the song's meaning as "the inability of people to communicate with each other, not particularly intentionally but especially emotionally, so what you see around you are people unable to love each other."[11] In a recent memoir by Sandy Greenberg, as reviewed in People magazine in December 2020, the song reflected the strong bond he had with his college buddy and best friend, Garfunkel, who adopted the special epithet 'Darkness' so as to empathise with Greenberg's sudden-onset blindness while in college.[14]

    To promote the release of their debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M., the duo performed again at Folk City, as well as two shows at the Gaslight Café, which went over poorly. Dave Van Ronk, a folk singer, was at the performances, and noted that several in the audience regarded their music as a joke."'Sounds of Silence' actually became a running joke: for a while there, it was only necessary to start singing 'Hello darkness, my old friend ... ' and everybody would crack up."Wednesday Morning, 3 AM sold only 3,000 copies upon its October release, and its dismal sales led Simon to move to London, England. While there, he recorded a solo album, The Paul Simon Songbook (1965), which features a rendition of the song, titled "The Sounds of Silence".

    The original recording of the song is in D♯ minor, using the chords D♯m, C♯, B and F♯. Simon plays a guitar with a capo on the sixth fret, using the shapes for Am, G, F and C chords. He provides the lower vocals for harmony while Garfunkel sings the melody.[19] The vocal span goes from C♯3 to F♯4 in the song.[20]

    Remix[edit]

    The song's heavy airplay in Cocoa Beach, Florida, alerted Columbia to release the single.

    Wednesday Morning, 3 A.M. had been a commercial failure before producer Tom Wilson was alerted that radio stations had begun to play "The Sound of Silence" in spring 1965. A late-night disc jockey at WBZ in Boston began to spin "The Sound of Silence" overnight, where it found a college demographic. Students at Harvard and Tufts University responded well, and the song made its way down the East Coast pretty much "overnight", "all the way to Cocoa Beach, Florida, where it caught the students coming down for spring break." A promotional executive for Columbia went to give away free albums of new artists, and beach-goers were interested only in the artists behind "The Sound of Silence". He phoned the home office in New York, alerting them of its appeal.[22] An alternate version of the story states that Wilson attended Columbia's July 1965 convention in Miami, where the head of the local sales branch raved about the song's airplay.[23]

    Folk rock was beginning to make waves on pop radio, with songs like the Byrds' "Mr. Tambourine Man" charting high.[24] Wilson listened to the song several times, considering it too soft for a wide release. Wilson had strong feeling about editing the song with explicit rock overtones. As stated by Geoffrey Hines, "If Columbia Records producer Tom Wilson hadn’t taken the initiative, without the singers’ knowledge, to dub a rock rhythm section over their folk rendition, the song never would have become a cultural touchstone—a generation's shorthand for alienation".[26] Wilson had also experimented the previous December with overdubbing an electric band over acoustic tracks by Bob Dylan; these recordings were never officially released, as Dylan and Wilson opted to record new tracks with a live band for what would become the album Bringing It All Back Home.

    On June 15, 1965, following sessions for Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone," Wilson retained guitarist Al Gorgoni and drummer Bobby Gregg from the Dylan sessions, adding guitarist Vinnie Bell and bassist Bob Bushnell.[27] The tempo on the original recording was uneven, making it difficult for the musicians to keep the song in time.[24] Engineer Roy Halee employed a heavy echo on the remix, which was a common trait of the Byrds' hits.[24] The single was first serviced to college FM rock stations, and a commercial single release followed on September 13, 1965.[23] The lack of consultation with Simon and Garfunkel on Wilson's remix was because, although still contracted to Columbia Records at the time, the musical duo at that time was no longer a "working entity".[24][28] It was not uncommon at the time for producers to add instruments or vocals to previously existing recordings and re-release them as new entities.

    In the fall of 1965, Simon was in Denmark, performing at small clubs, and picked up a copy of Billboard, as he had routinely done for several years.[23] Upon seeing "The Sound of Silence" in the Billboard Hot 100, he bought a copy of Cashbox and saw the same thing. Several days later, Garfunkel excitedly called Simon to inform him of the single's growing success.[23] A copy of the 7-inch single arrived in the mail the next day, and according to friend Al Stewart, "Paul was horrified when he first heard it ... [when the] rhythm section slowed down at one point so that Paul and Artie's voices could catch up." Garfunkel was far less concerned about the remix, feeling conditioned to the process of trying to create a hit single: "It's interesting, I suppose it might do something, It might sell," he told Wilson.

    Lyrics[edit]

    The lyrics of the song are written in five stanzas of seven lines each. Each stanza begins with a couplet describing the setting of the scene, followed by a couplet driving the action forward and another couplet expressing the climactic thought of the verse, and closes with a one-line refrain related to the eponymous lyrics "the sound of silence". This structure is supported by a melodic contour, where the first and second lines are paired with the arpeggio A-C-E-D and a repeat a step lower, respectively. The arpeggio is then stretched to become C-E-G-A-G and repeated twice in the second couplet. For the last three lines, the contour then leaps from C to the higher A, rises to the higher C, and then falls back to the A before singing the stretched arpeggio in reverse and finally retreating to the lower A.[19] The progress of the lyrics through its five stanzas places the singer into an incrementally increasing tension with an increasingly ambiguous "sound of silence". The irony of using the word "sound" to describe silence in the title lyrics suggests a paradoxical symbolism being used by the singer, which the lyrics of the fourth stanza eventually identifies as "silence like a cancer grows". The "sound of silence" is symbolically taken also to denote the cultural alienation associated with much of the 1960s.[26] In the counterculture movements of the 1960s, the phrase "sound of silence" can be compared to other more commonly used turns of phrase such as "turning a deaf ear" often associated with the detachment experienced with impersonal large governments.

    The first stanza presents the singer as taking some relative solace in the peacefulness he associates with "darkness" which is submerged "within" the ambiguous sound of silence.[30] The second stanza has the effect of breaking into the silence with "the flash of a neon light" which leaves the singer "touched" by the enduring ambiguity of the sound of silence. In the third stanza, a "naked light" emerges as a vision of 10,000 people all caught within their own solitude and alienation without any one of them being able to "disturb" the recurring sound of silence.

    In the fourth stanza, the singer proclaims in a declarative voice that "silence like a cancer grows", though his words "like silent raindrops fell" without ever being heard against the by now cancerous sound of silence. The fifth stanza appears to culminate with the urgency raised by the declarative voice in the fourth stanza through the apparent triumph of a false "neon god". The false neon god is only challenged when a "sign flashed out its warning" that only the words of the indigent written on "subway walls and tenement halls" could still "whisper" their truth against the recurring and ambiguous form of "the sound of silence". The song has no lyrical bridge or change of key, and was written without any lyrical intro or outro to start or end the song.

    Personnel[edit]

    (electric overdubs) personnel

    Charts performance[edit]

    Charts history[edit]

    "The Sound of Silence" first broke in Boston, where it became one of the top-selling singles in early November 1965;[23][31] it spread to Miami and Washington, D.C. two weeks later, reaching number one in Boston and debuting on the Billboard Hot 100.[32]

    Throughout the month of January 1966 "The Sound of Silence" had a one-on-one battle with the Beatles' "We Can Work It Out" for the No. 1 spot on the Billboard Hot 100. The former was No. 1 for the weeks of January 1 and 22 and No. 2 for the intervening two weeks. The latter held the top spot for the weeks of January 8, 15, and 29, and was No. 2 for the two weeks that "The Sound of Silence" was No. 1. Overall, "The Sound of Silence" spent 14 weeks on the Billboard chart.[33]

    In the wake of the song's success, Simon promptly returned to the United States to record a new Simon & Garfunkel album at Columbia's request. He later described his experiences learning the song went to No. 1, a story he repeated in numerous interviews:

    I had come back to New York, and I was staying in my old room at my parents' house. Artie was living at his parents' house, too. I remember Artie and I were sitting there in my car one night, parked on a street in Queens, and the announcer [on the radio] said, "Number one, Simon & Garfunkel." And Artie said to me, "That Simon & Garfunkel, they must be having a great time." Because there we were on a street corner [in my car in] Queens, smoking a joint. We didn't know what to do with ourselves.

    For his part, Garfunkel had a different memory of the song's success:

    We were in L.A. Our manager called us at the hotel we were staying at. We were both in the same room. We must have bunked in the same room in those days. I picked up the phone. He said, 'Well, congratulations. Next week you will go from five to one in Billboard.' It was fun. I remember pulling open the curtains and letting the brilliant sun come into this very red room, and then ordering room service. That was good.

    Weekly charts[edit]

    Certifications[edit]

    Cover by Disturbed[edit]

    50 years after its original release, a cover version of "The Sound of Silence" was released by American heavy metal band Disturbed on December 7, 2015.[61][62] A music video was also released.[63] Their cover hit number one on the Billboard Hard Rock Digital Songs[64] and Mainstream Rock charts,[65] and is their highest-charting song on the Hot 100,[66] peaking at number 42. It is also their highest-charting single in Australia, peaking at number four. David Draiman sings it in the key of F#m. The chord progression is F#m, E, D, A. The first two verses are almost an octave lower than the original and jumped up an octave for the last three verses.[67] His vocal span goes from E2 to A4 in scientific pitch notation.[68]

    In April 2016, Paul Simon endorsed the cover.[69] Additionally, on April 1, Simon sent Draiman an email praising Disturbed's performance of the rendition on American talk show Conan. Simon wrote, "Really powerful performance on Conan the other day. First time I'd seen you do it live. Nice. Thanks." Draiman responded, "Mr. Simon, I am honored beyond words. We only hoped to pay homage and honor to the brilliance of one of the greatest songwriters of all time. Your compliment means the world to me/us and we are eternally grateful."[70] As of September 2017, the single had sold over 1.5 million digital downloads[71] and had been streamed over 54 million times, estimated Nielsen Music.[72] The music video has over 700 million views on YouTube, while the live performance on Conan has over 120 million, making it the most watched YouTube video from the show.

    Accolades[edit]

    Weekly charts[edit]

    Year-end charts[edit]

    Decade-end charts[edit]

    Certifications[edit]

    Legacy[edit]

    Paul Simon released a solo acoustic version of "The Sound of Silence" in the spring of 1974. His version reached #84 in Canada[49] and #97 on the US Cash Box chart.[45] It was also a minor Adult Contemporary hit (US #50, Canada #42).[50][48]

    In 1999, BMI named "The Sound of Silence" as the 18th most-performed song of the 20th century.[117] In 2004, it was ranked No. 156 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, one of the duo's three songs on the list. The song is now considered "the quintessential folk rock release".[118] On March 21, 2013, the song was added to the National Recording Registry in the Library of Congress for long-term preservation along with the rest of the Sounds of Silence album.[119]

    On September 27, 2016, the Disturbed version of "The Sound of Silence" was released as downloadable content for the video game Rock Band 4. The Disturbed version was used in the episode "Ian Garvey" of The Blacklist in November 2017.[120] A live version of "The Sound of Silence" with guest Myles Kennedy is included on Live at Red Rocks and Evolution (Deluxe Edition). The AMC show Into the Badlands features Disturbed's version of "The Sound of Silence" in episode 13 of season 3 ("Black Lotus, White Rose") in April 2019.[citation needed]

    The a cappella group Pentatonix recorded a cover of the song, released as a single in 2019. The video amassed more than 50 million views in a year.

    In popular culture[edit]

    Film and television[edit]

    When director Mike Nichols and Sam O'Steen were editing the 1967 film The Graduate, they initially timed some scenes to this song, intending to substitute original music for the scenes. However, they eventually concluded that an adequate substitute could not be found and decided to purchase the rights for the song for the soundtrack. This was an unusual decision, as the song had charted more than a year earlier, and recycling established music for film was not commonly done at the time.[121]

    With the practice of using well-known songs for films becoming more commonplace, "The Sound of Silence" has since been used for other films, including Kingpin (1996), Old School (2003), Bobby (2006), Watchmen (2009), Trolls (2016), and A Twelve Year Night (2018). In the German TV movie Ein Drilling kommt selten allein the song was sung by grandparents to calm down crying triplets.

    The song was used during the fourth season of the television series Arrested Development in 2013 as a running gag alluding to characters' (primarily GOB's) inner reflections. It was also used as part of the soundtrack of episode 4 of The Vietnam War, the 2017 documentary series by Ken Burns and Lynn Novick. The fifth season of “The Blacklist” television series used the Disturbed cover version in episode 8 as part of its soundtrack.

    Other allusions and parodies[edit]

    The Canadian band Rush alluded to the song lyrics in the last lines of their 1980 hit song "The Spirit of Radio."[122]

    The song was parodied by faith-based comedian Tim Hawkins (as 'Sounds of Starbucks') on October 16, 2018.[123]

    On August 10, 2021, The Holderness Family released a parody version about wanting the children out of the house for school following the lockdowns and school closings due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[124]

    References[edit]

    Notes

    1. ^Fontenot, Robert (October 29, 2015). "What is Folk-Rock Music?". ThoughtCo.com. Archived from the original on March 13, 2017. Retrieved March 12, 2017.
    2. ^"Original versions of The Sound of Silence by The Bachelors [IE]". SecondHandSongs.
    3. ^Mastropolo, Frank (March 10, 2015). "51 Years Ago: Simon & Garfunkel Record Their First Classic, 'The Sounds of Silence'". Ultimate Classic Rock.
    4. ^Michael Hall (January 6, 2014). "The Greatest Music Producer You've Never Heard of Is..."Texas Monthly. Retrieved May 17, 2019.
    5. ^Marc Eliot (October 2010). Paul Simon: A Life. John Wiley and Sons. p. 39.
    6. ^"Paul Simon - Interview - 7/6/1986 (Official)". YouTube. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    7. ^Paul Simon chats about his youth. YouTube. April 19, 2011.
    8. ^ abMarc Eliot (October 2010). Paul Simon: A Life. John Wiley and Sons. p. 40.
    9. ^Schwartz, Tony (February 1984). "Playboy Interview"(PDF). Playboy. 31 (2): 49–51, 162–176.
    10. ^"Art Garfunkel's Beloved Blind College Roommate Awards $3 Million to Scientists to Cure Blindness". People.com. Retrieved April 22, 2021.
    11. ^ abBennighof, James (2007). The Words and Music of Paul Simon. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 9–11. ISBN . Retrieved September 3, 2021.
    12. ^"Simon & Garfunkel "The Sound of Silence" Sheet Music in D Minor (transposable)". Musicnotes.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    13. ^Bosso, Joe (August 1, 2012). "Interview: Art Garfunkel on his new greatest hits CD, The Singer". MusicRadar.
    14. ^ abcdeSullivan, Steve (2013). Encyclopedia of Great Popular Song Recordings, Volume 2. pp. 109–110.
    15. ^ abcdSimons, David. Studio Stories. pp. 95–96.
    16. ^ abGeoffrey Hines. "How “The Sound of Silence” Became a Surprise Hit". Smithsonian Magazine. Jan-Feb 2016. [1].
    17. ^Charlesworth, Chris (1996). "Sound of Silence". The Complete Guide to the Music of Paul Simon and Simon & Garfunkel. Omnibus Press. pp. 17–18. ISBN .
    18. ^Simons, David (2004). Studio Stories: How the Great New York Records Were Made. San Francisco: Backbeat Books. pp. 94–97. ISBN .
    19. ^Schwartz, Tony (February 1984). "Playboy Interview"(PDF). Playboy. 31 (2): 49–51, 162–176.
    20. ^"Top Sellers in Top Markets". Billboard. Vol. 77 no. 45. November 6, 1965. p. 14. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved September 23, 2014.
    21. ^"Top Sellers in Top Markets". Billboard. Vol. 77 no. 47. November 20, 1965. pp. 14–15. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved September 23, 2014.
    22. ^Billboard Charts Archives for 1965 and 1966
    23. ^"The Sounds of Silence". Retrieved September 17, 2012.
    24. ^Canada, Library and Archives (July 17, 2013). "Image : RPM Weekly".
    25. ^オリジナルコンフィデンス. (in Japanese). 年代流行. Retrieved October 29, 2017.
    26. ^"flavour of new zealand - search listener". www.flavourofnz.co.nz.
    27. ^"SA Charts 1965–March 1989". Retrieved September 1, 2018.
    28. ^Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (1st ed.). Spain: Fundación Autor-SGAE. ISBN .
    29. ^Hung, Steffen. "Simon & Garfunkel: The Sounds of Silence". swisscharts.com. Retrieved April 21, 2012.
    30. ^Joel Whitburn's Top Pop Singles 1955-1990 - ISBN 0-89820-089-X
    31. ^ ab"Cash Box Top 100 1/29/66". Tropicalglen.com. January 29, 1966. Archived from the original on May 30, 2015. Retrieved August 21, 2017.
    32. ^* Zimbabwe. Kimberley, C. Zimbabwe: singles chart book. Harare: C. Kimberley, 2000
    33. ^"Simon & Garfunkel Chart History (Hot Rock & Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
    34. ^ ab"Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. June 8, 1974. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
    35. ^ ab"Item Display - RPM - Library and Archives Canada". Collectionscanada.gc.ca. May 25, 1974. Retrieved January 15, 2021.
    36. ^ abWhitburn, Joel (1993). Top Adult Contemporary: 1961-1993. Record Research. p. 216.
    37. ^"Cash Box Top 100 5/18/74". Cashboxmagazine.com. Retrieved April 22, 2021.
    38. ^"Top 20 Hit Singles of 1966". Retrieved September 12, 2018.
    39. ^"Top 100 Hits of 1966/Top 100 Songs of 1966". Musicoutfitters.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    40. ^"The Cash Box Year-End Charts: 1966/Top 100 Pop Singles, December 24, 1966". Tropicalglen.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2016.
    41. ^"Hot Rock Songs – Year-End 2016". Billboard. Retrieved May 5, 2020.
    42. ^"Canadian single certifications – Simon And Garfunkel – The Sound of Silence". Music Canada. Retrieved February 22, 2021.
    43. ^"Danish single certifications – Simon & Garfunkel – The Sound of Silence". IFPI Danmark. Retrieved March 20, 2020.
    44. ^"Italian single certifications – Simon & Garfunkel – The Sound of Silence" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved February 22, 2021. Select "2016" in the "Anno" drop-down menu. Select "The Sound of Silence" in the "Filtra" field. Select "Singoli" under "Sezione".
    45. ^"British single certifications – Simon & Garfunkel – The Sound of Silence". British Phonographic Industry. Retrieved February 8, 2019.Select singles in the Format field. Select Gold in the Certification field. Type The Sound of Silence in the "Search BPI Awards" field and then press Enter.
    46. ^"American single certifications – Simon & Garfunkel – Sounds of Silence". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved March 17, 2014.
    47. ^"Disturbed Return with 'Immortalized' - Billboard". Billboard.
    48. ^"Gold & Platinum - RIAA". RIAA. Retrieved October 31, 2016.
    49. ^"Video Premiere: Disturbed's Cover Version Of Simon & Garfunkel's 'The Sound Of Silence'". Blabbermouth.
    50. ^ ab"Hard Rock Digital Songs, Jan 2, 2016". Billboard. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
    51. ^"The Sound of Silence-d Guitars: Disturbed's Haunting Simon & Garfunkel Cover Tops Mainstream Rock Songs Chart". Billboard.
    52. ^"Simon & Garfunkel's 'Sound of Silence' Hits Hot Rock Songs Top 10, Thanks to 'Sad Affleck'". Billboard.
    53. ^"The Sound of Silence Chords by Disturbed @ Ultimate-Guitar.com". tabs.ultimate-guitar.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    54. ^"Disturbed "The Sound of Silence" Sheet Music in F# Minor (transposable) - Download & Print - SKU: MN0164135". Musicnotes.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    55. ^"Paul Simon Endorses Disturbed's 'Sound of Silence' Cover on Facebook". Facebook.com. Retrieved October 7, 2018.
    56. ^"Disturbed Receive Paul Simon Approval for 'Sound of Silence'". Loudwire.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    57. ^ ab"Nielsen SoundScan charts – Digital Songs – Week Ending: 09/28/2017"(PDF). Nielsen SoundScan. Archived from the original(PDF) on October 2, 2017. Retrieved October 3, 2017.
    58. ^Ayers, Mike (May 25, 2016). "With 'The Sound of Silence,' Disturbed Finds a Crossover Moment - Speakeasy - WSJ". Blogs.wsj.com. Retrieved September 29, 2016.
    59. ^"20 Best Rock Songs of 2016". Loudwire.
    60. ^"10 Best Rock Videos of 2016". Loudwire.
    61. ^"Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". ARIA Top 50 Singles. Retrieved April 9, 2016.
    62. ^"Disturbed – The Sound of Silence" (in German). Ö3 Austria Top 40. Retrieved May 25, 2016.
    63. ^"Disturbed – The Sound of Silence" (in Dutch). Ultratop 50. Retrieved December 24, 2016.
    64. ^"Disturbed Chart History (Canadian Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved April 12, 2016.
    65. ^"ČNS IFPI" (in Czech). Hitparáda – Radio Top 100 Oficiální. IFPI Czech Republic. Note: Change the chart to CZ – RADIO – TOP 100 and insert 201650 into search. Retrieved December 2, 2018.
    66. ^"Le Top de la semaine : Top Singles Téléchargés - SNEP (Week 38, 2016)" (in French). Syndicat National de l'Édition Phonographique. Retrieved September 24, 2016.
    67. ^"Disturbed – The Sound of Silence" (in German). GfK Entertainment Charts. Retrieved October 21, 2016.
    68. ^"Airplay Charts Deutschland – Woche 01/2017". German Charts. Retrieved March 30, 2017.
    69. ^"Archívum – Slágerlisták – MAHASZ" (in Hungarian). Single (track) Top 40 lista. Magyar Hanglemezkiadók Szövetsége. Retrieved October 27, 2016.
    70. ^"Chart Track: Week 19, 2016". Irish Singles Chart. Retrieved May 14, 2016.
    71. ^"NZ Top 40 Singles Chart". Recorded Music NZ. May 30, 2016. Retrieved May 27, 2016.
    72. ^"Portuguesecharts.com - Singles (Week 22)". Associação Fonográfica Portuguesa. Retrieved June 12, 2016.
    73. ^"Portugal Digital Songs". Billboard. Retrieved May 30, 2016.
    74. ^"Official Scottish Singles Sales Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
    75. ^"SloTop50 – Slovenian official singles chart". slotop50.si. Retrieved August 28, 2018.
    76. ^"Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". Singles Top 100. Retrieved February 26, 2016.
    77. ^"Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". Swiss Singles Chart. Retrieved December 26, 2016.
    78. ^"Official Singles Chart Top 100". Official Charts Company. Retrieved May 6, 2016.
    79. ^"Disturbed Chart History (Hot 100)". Billboard. Retrieved April 19, 2016.
    80. ^"Disturbed Chart History (Hot Rock & Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved January 25, 2016.
    81. ^"Disturbed Chart History (Rock Airplay)". Billboard. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
    82. ^"Disturbed Chart History (Alternative Airplay)". Billboard. Retrieved March 1, 2016.
    83. ^"Disturbed Chart History (Mainstream Rock)". Billboard. Retrieved January 27, 2016.
    84. ^"Listy bestsellerów, wyróżnienia :: Związek Producentów Audio-Video". Polish Airplay Top 100. Retrieved January 28, 2019.
    85. ^"ARIA Top 100 Singles 2016". Australian Recording Industry Association. Retrieved January 6, 2017.
    86. ^"Ö3 Austria Top 40 - Single-Charts 2016". oe3.orf.at. Archived from the original on December 28, 2016. Retrieved December 28, 2016.
    87. ^"Top 100 Jahrescharts 2016". GfK Entertainment (in German). viva.tv. Retrieved January 1, 2017.
    88. ^"Årslista Singlar – År 2016" (in Swedish). Sverigetopplistan. Retrieved February 17, 2018.
    89. ^"Rock Songs – Year-End 2016". Billboard. Retrieved September 3, 2019.
    90. ^"Bald ist nicht nur das Jahr zu Ende, sondern auch das ganze Jahrzehnt. Deshalb präsentieren wir euch ab heute die 50 erfolgreichsten Singles und Alben der Zehnerjahre. Platz 50 der Singles geht an Disturbed, Platz 50 der Alben an Tim @bendzko ("Wenn Worte meine Sprache wären")". GfK Entertainment (in German). offiziellecharts.de. Retrieved November 18, 2019 – via Twitter.
    91. ^"Decade-End Charts: Hot Rock Songs". Billboard. Retrieved December 18, 2019.
    92. ^"Chart Watch #385". auspOp. September 10, 2016. Retrieved September 10, 2016.
    93. ^"Austrian single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence" (in German). IFPI Austria.
    94. ^"Canadian single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". Music Canada. Retrieved June 20, 2018.
    95. ^"Danish single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". IFPI Danmark. Retrieved October 27, 2020.
    96. ^"Gold-/Platin-Datenbank (Disturbed; 'The Sound of Silence')" (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. Retrieved April 14, 2018.
    97. ^"Italian single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence" (in Italian). Federazione Industria Musicale Italiana. Retrieved May 15, 2017. Select "2017" in the "Anno" drop-down menu. Select "The Sound of Silence" in the "Filtra" field. Select "Singoli" under "Sezione".
    98. ^"New Zealand single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". Recorded Music NZ. Retrieved April 29, 2016.
    99. ^"Norwegian single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence" (in Norwegian). IFPI Norway. Retrieved April 13, 2019.
    100. ^"The Official Swiss Charts and Music Community: Awards (Disturbed; 'The Sound of Silence')". IFPI Switzerland. Hung Medien.
    101. ^"British single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". British Phonographic Industry.
    102. ^"American single certifications – Disturbed – The Sound of Silence". Recording Industry Association of America.
    103. ^"BMI Top 100 Songs of the Century: 8 Million+ Performances". Archived from the original on July 12, 2001. Retrieved April 20, 2017., 1999 (archive.org copy)
    104. ^Hoffmann, Frank (2005). "Folk Rock". Encyclopedia of Recorded Sound. 1 (2nd ed.). New York: Routledge. p. 408. ISBN .
    105. ^"Simon & Garfunkel song among those to be preserved". CFN13. Archived from the original on April 10, 2013. Retrieved March 21, 2013.
    106. ^""The Blacklist" -> "Ian Garvey" Soundtrack". IMDB.com.
    107. ^Harris, Mark (2008). Pictures at a Revolution. Penguin. pp. 360–1.
    108. ^Prato, Greg. "The Story Behind The Song: The Spirit Of Radio by Rush". Classic Rock Magazine. Retrieved September 12, 2019.
    109. ^"Comedian Tim Hawkins Performs Parody Of "Sound Of Silence" And Has Internet Rolling In Laughter". FaithTap.com. Retrieved November 5, 2019.
    110. ^"Sound Of Silence - Simon & Garfunkel Parody". YouTube.com. Retrieved August 18, 2021.

    Bibliography

    External links[edit]

    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Sound_of_Silence
    Simon and Garfunkel \

    We agreed to meet at the bus stop in the city center. We saw each other's photos on the net, so I was not afraid that I would not recognize her. I arrived a little earlier, trembling all over with excitement and, frankly, thinking about leaving. Galina was three minutes late.

    You will also like:

    The celebration had been going on for several hours and I was getting a little bored. I sat down near the monument. Vika came up to me and kissed me. "Why are you sad, little fox?" said Vika. "Do you want me to lighten your mood a little?" she suggested and sat down next to him.



    904 905 906 907 908