Oregon house of representatives members

Oregon house of representatives members DEFAULT

The Oregon Legislative Assembly is the state legislature for the state of Oregon. The Legislative Assembly is a bicameral body, consisting of an upper house, the Oregon State Senate, and a lower house, the Oregon House of Representatives. There are no term limits for either house in the Legislative Assembly.



Gov. Kate Brown (D) signed new state legislative maps into law on Sept. 27, 2021. The maps were approved by the Oregon House of Representatives 31-18, and approved in the Oregon State Senate 18-11.[1] These maps take effect for Oregon’s 2022 legislative elections. Click here for more information.

Oregon has a Democratic state government trifecta. A trifecta exists when one political party simultaneously holds the governor’s office and majorities in both state legislative chambers. As of October 19, 2021, there are 23 Republican trifectas, 15 Democratic trifectas, and 12 divided governments where neither party holds trifecta control.

In the 2020 election, Republicans had a net gain of two trifectas and two states under divided government became trifectas. Prior to that election, Oregon had a Democratic trifecta. There were 21 Republican trifectas, 15 Democratic trifectas, and 14 divided governments.

See also: Oregon House of Representatives, Oregon State Senate, Oregon Governor

Elections

2022

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2022 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2022

Elections for the Oregon State Senate will take place in 2022. The general election is on November 8, 2022. A primary is scheduled for May 17, 2022. The filing deadline is March 8, 2022.

Elections for the Oregon House of Representatives will take place in 2022. The general election is on November 8, 2022. A primary is scheduled for May 17, 2022. The filing deadline is March 8, 2022.

2020

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2020 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2020

Elections for the office of Oregon State Senate took place in 2020. The general election was held on November 3, 2020. A primary was scheduled for May 19, 2020. The filing deadline was March 10, 2020.

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2020. The general election was held on November 3, 2020. A primary was scheduled for May 19, 2020. The filing deadline was March 10, 2020.

2018

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2018 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2018

Elections for the Oregon State Senate took place in 2018. A closed primary election took place on May 15, 2018, and the general election was held on November 6, 2018. The candidate filing deadline was March 6, 2018Filing deadline.[2]

Elections for the Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2018. A closed primary election took place on May 15, 2018, and the general election was held on November 6, 2018. The candidate filing deadline was March 6, 2018Filing deadline.[3]

2016

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2016 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2016

Elections for the Oregon State Senate took place in 2016. The primary election took place on May 17, 2016, and the general election was held on November 8, 2016. The candidate filing deadline was March 8, 2016.

Elections for the Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2016. The primary election took place on May 17, 2016, and the general election was held on November 8, 2016. The candidate filing deadline was March 8, 2016.

2014

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2014 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2014

Elections for the Oregon State Senate took place in 2014. A primary election took place on May 20, 2014. The general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was March 11, 2014.

Elections for the Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2014. A primary election took place on May 20, 2014. The general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was March 11, 2014.

2012

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2012 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2012

Elections for the office of Oregon State Senate took place in 2012. The primary election was held on May 15, 2012, and the general election was held on November 6, 2012. The candidate filing deadline was March 6, 2012.

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2012. The primary election was held on May 15, 2012, and the general election was held on November 6, 2012. The candidate filing deadline was March 6, 2012.

2010

See also: Oregon State Senate elections, 2010 and Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2010

Elections for the office of Oregon State Senate took place in 2010. The primary election was held on May 18, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. The candidate filing deadline was March 9, 2010.

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2010. The primary election was held on May 18, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. The candidate filing deadline was March 9, 2010.

Sessions

Article IV of the Oregon Constitution establishes when the Legislature is to meet. Section 10 of Article IV states that the Legislature will meet in regular session once every two years. The section goes on to establish starting dates for these sessions, but these dates have been changed by law (as the section allows). Under current law, sessions convene on the second Monday in January of all odd years.[4]

Section 10 of Article IV also requires the presiding officers of both legislative houses to convene an emergency session of the Legislature when a majority of the members of each house request an emergency session.

2021

See also: 2021 Oregon legislative session and Dates of 2021 state legislative sessions

In 2021, the legislature was scheduled to convene on January 21, 2021, and adjourn on June 26, 2021.

2020

See also: 2020 Oregon legislative session and Dates of 2020 state legislative sessions

In 2020, the legislature was scheduled to convene on February 3, 2020, and adjourn on March 5, 2020.

Effect of coronavirus pandemic

See also: Changes to state legislative session dates in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, 2020

Several state legislatures had their sessions impacted as a result of the 2020 coronavirus pandemic. No modifications to state legislative activity in Oregon were made.

2019

See also: 2019 Oregon legislative session and Dates of 2019 state legislative sessions

In 2019, the legislature was in session from January 22, 2019, through June 30, 2019.

2018

See also: 2018 Oregon legislative session and Dates of 2018 state legislative sessions

In 2018, the legislature was in session from February 5, 2018, through March 3, 2018. To read about notable events and legislation from this session, click here.

Click [show] for past years' session dates.

2017

See also: Dates of 2017 state legislative sessions

In 2017, the legislature was in session from February 1, 2017, through July 7, 2017.

2016

See also: Dates of 2016 state legislative sessions

In 2016, the legislature was in session from February 1 through March 3.

2015

See also: Dates of 2015 state legislative sessions

In 2015, the legislature was in session from February 2 through July 6.

Major issues in 2015

Major issues in the 2015 legislative session included raising the minimum wage, a transportation package to fix roads and bridges, environmental legislation on the state's low-carbon fuel standard, and funding education.[5]

2014

See also: Dates of 2014 state legislative sessions

In 2014, the legislature was in session from February 3 through March 10.

Major issues in 2014

Major issues in the 2014 legislative session included marijuana, gun control, liquor in grocery stores, the environment, health, the budget, Oregon Lottery reform, and the Columbia River Crossing project.[6]

2013

See also: Dates of 2013 state legislative sessions

In 2013, the legislature was in session from February 4 to July 9.

Major issues in 2013

Major issues in the 2013 legislative session included in-state tuition, driver's licenses for undocumented immigrants, and background checks for guns.[7][8]

2012

See also: Dates of 2012 state legislative sessions

In 2012, the legislature was in session from February 1 through March 6.

2011

See also: Dates of 2011 state legislative sessions

In 2011, the legislature was in session from February 1 through June 30.[9]

2010

See also: Dates of 2010 state legislative sessions

In 2010, the Legislature did not hold a regular session. However, the Legislature was in special session from February 1st to February 25th.[10]

Role in state budget

See also: Oregon state budget and finances

The state operates on a biennial budget cycle. The sequence of key events in the budget process is as follows:[11]

  1. Budget instructions are sent to state agencies between February and May.
  2. State agencies submit their budget requests to the governor in September.
  3. Agency hearings are held between September and November.
  4. The governor submits his or her proposed budget to the state legislature by December 1. For new governors, the deadline is the first day the legislature convenes.
  5. The legislature adopts a budget between February and June. A simple majority is required to pass a budget. The biennium begins July 1.


Oregon is one of 44 states in which the governor has line item veto authority.[11]

The governor is constitutionally required to submit a balanced budget proposal. Likewise, the legislature is required to pass a balanced budget.[11]

Redistricting

See also: Redistricting in Oregon

In Oregon, congressional and state legislative district lines are drawn by the state legislature. District lines are subject to veto by the governor.[12]

If the legislature fails to establish a redistricting plan for state legislative districts, it falls to the secretary of state to draw the boundaries.[12]

State law requires that congressional and state legislative districts meet the following criteria:[12]

  • Districts must be contiguous.
  • Districts must "utilize existing geographic or political boundaries."
  • Districts should not "divide communities of common interest."
  • Districts should "be connected by transportation links."
  • Districts "must not be drawn for the purpose of favoring a political party, incumbent or other person."

2020

See also: Redistricting in Oregon after the 2020 census



Gov. Kate Brown (D) signed new state legislative maps into law on Sept. 27, 2021. The maps were approved by the Oregon House of Representatives 31-18, and approved in the Oregon State Senate 18-11.[13] These maps take effect for Oregon’s 2022 legislative elections.

State House of Representatives

Oregon enacted state house map.jpg

State Senate

Oregon enacted state senate map.jpg

2010

See also: Redistricting in Oregon after the 2010 census

Oregon's population increased by 12 percent from 2000-2010, exceeding the national average of 9.7 percent. Gov. John Kitzhaber (D) signed the state's redistricting plan into law on June 13, 2011, six days after its original proposal. This was the first time Oregon enacted a redistricting plan without the involvement of the Secretary of State in 100 years.

Legislators

Salaries

See also: Comparison of state legislative salaries
State legislators
SalaryPer diem
$32,839/year$151/day

When sworn in

See also: When state legislators assume office after a general election

Oregon assume office the second Monday in January following the election.[14]

Senate

The Oregon State Senate is the upper house of the Oregon Legislative Assembly. There are 30 members of the State Senate, representing 30 districts across the state. Each member represented an average of 127,702 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[15] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 114,047.[16] Each Senate district is composed of exactly two House districts: Senate District 1 contains House Districts 1 and 2, SD 2 contains HD 3 and HD 4, and so on.

Party As of October 2021
    Democratic Party 18
    Republican Party 11
     Independent 1
     Vacancies 0
Total 30

Click here for a list of members of this chamber.

Between 1992 and 2020, partisan control of the Oregon State Senate passed from a Democratic majority to a Republican one, then switched back. The table below shows the partisan history of the Oregon State Senate following every general election from 1992 to 2020. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

Oregon State Senate Party Control: 1992-2020

Year '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 '20
Democrats161110121415181718161618171818
Republicans141920181615121112141412131212

The shifts in partisan balance in the state Senate were gradual between 1992 and 2020, with three major changes to control of the chamber in that time. As a result of the 1994 elections, Republicans gained five seats and took control of the chamber with a 19-11 majority. Republicans would maintain control of the chamber until 2002, when the partisan balance moved to a 15-15 split. Democrats gained three seats in 2004, moving the chamber to an 18-12 Democratic majority. As a result of the 2020 elections, Democrats held an 18-12 majority.

House of Representatives

The Oregon House of Representatives is the lower house of the Oregon Legislative Assembly. There are 60 members of the House, representing 60 districts across the state. Each member represented an average of 63,851 residents, as of the 2010 Census.[15] After the 2000 Census, each member represented 57,023.[16]

Party As of October 2021
    Democratic Party 37
    Republican Party 23
     Vacancies 0
Total 60

Click here for a list of members of this chamber.

Between 1992 and 2020, partisan control of the Oregon House of Representatives shifted in favor of the Democratic Party. The table below shows the partisan history of the Oregon House of Representatives following every general election from 1992 to 2020. All data from 2006 or earlier comes from Michael Dubin's Party Affiliations in the State Legislatures (McFarland Press, 2007). Data after 2006 was compiled by Ballotpedia staff.

Oregon House of Representatives Party Control: 1992-2020

Year '92 '94 '96 '98 '00 '02 '04 '06 '08 '10 '12 '14 '16 '18 '20
Democrats282629252725273136303435353837
Republicans323431343335332924302625252223

Changes in the partisan balance of the state House were generally gradual between 1992 and 2020. Between 1992 and 2004, Republican majorities remained relatively steady, with the party's strongest majority resulting from the 2002 elections. At that point, Republicans had a 10-seat advantage with a 35-25 majority. Democrats gained four seats in the 2006 elections, moving the chamber to a 31-29 Democratic majority. That majority held until 2010, when Republicans gained six seats to split the chamber at a 30-30 balance. Democrats regained their majority after 2012, and have expanded their control since that election.

District maps

State Senate

Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Oregon_State_Legislature

Oregon House of Representatives

State legislatures
  • Alabama (H, S)
  • Alaska (H, S)
  • Arizona (H, S)
  • Arkansas (H, S)
  • California (A, S)
  • Colorado (H, S)
  • Connecticut (H, S)
  • Delaware (H, S)
  • Florida (H, S)
  • Georgia (H, S)
  • Hawaii (H, S)
  • Idaho (H, S)
  • Illinois (H, S)
  • Indiana (H, S)
  • Iowa (H, S)
  • Kansas (H, S)
  • Kentucky (H, S)
  • Louisiana (H, S)
  • Maine (H, S)
  • Maryland (H, S)
  • Massachusetts (H, S)
  • Michigan (H, S)
  • Minnesota (H, S)
  • Mississippi (H, S)
  • Missouri (H, S)
  • Montana (H, S)
  • Nebraska
  • Nevada (A, S)
  • New Hampshire (H, S)
  • New Jersey (GA, S)
  • New Mexico (H, S)
  • New York (A, S)
  • North Carolina (H, S)
  • North Dakota (H, S)
  • Ohio (H, S)
  • Oklahoma (H, S)
  • Oregon (H, S)
  • Pennsylvania (H, S)
  • Rhode Island (H, S)
  • South Carolina (H, S)
  • South Dakota (H, S)
  • Tennessee (H, S)
  • Texas (H, S)
  • Utah (H, S)
  • Vermont (H, S)
  • Virginia (H, S)
  • Washington (H, S)
  • West Virginia (H, S)
  • Wisconsin (A, S)
  • Wyoming (H, S)
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oregon_House_of_Representatives
  1. Dog kennels in pittsburgh pa
  2. Fall for you shanice lyrics
  3. Dares for guys over texting

2014

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2014

Elections for the Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2014. A primary election took place on May 20, 2014. The general election was held on November 4, 2014. The signature filing deadline for candidates wishing to run in this election was March 11, 2014.

Heading into the election, Democrats held a 34-26 majority. Democrats gained one seat in the election, giving them a 35-25 majority.

Oregon House of Representatives
Party As of November 3, 2014 After November 4, 2014
    Democratic Party3435
    Republican Party 26 25
Total6060

2012

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2012

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2012. The primary election was held on May 15, 2012, and the general election was held on November 6, 2012. The candidate filing deadline was March 6, 2012. All 60 seats were up for election.

Heading into the election, the chamber was tied at 30-30. Democrats gained four seats in the election, giving them a 34-26 majority.

Oregon House of Representatives
Party As of November 5, 2012 After the 2012 Election
    Democratic Party 30 34
    Republican Party3026
Total6060

During the 2012 election, the total value of contributions to the 150 House candidates was $20,282,835. The top 10 contributors were:[6]

2012 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Building Trades Pac $1,740,000
Promote Oregon Leadership $1,059,662
Oregon Democratic Party $818,295
Service Employees Local 530 $653,056
Oregon Education Association $413,934
Oregon Health Care Association $356,438
Friends of Bruce Hanna $298,174
Oregon Transformation Project $263,964
Oregon Beer & Wine Distributors Association $258,115
Associated Oregon Industries $250,681


The following table details the 10 districts with the smallest margin of victory in the November 6 general election.

2012 Margin of Victory, Oregon House of Representatives
District Winner Margin of Victory Total Votes Top Opponent
District 40Democratic PartyBrent Barton1.3%27,818Steve Newgard
District 52Republican PartyMark Johnson3.4%27,751Peter Nordbye
District 30Democratic PartyJoe Gallegos4.8%24,836Shawn Lindsay
District 37Republican PartyJulie Parrish5.4%20,561Carl Hosticka
District 51Democratic PartyShemia Fagan5.8%23,783Patrick Sheehan
District 29Democratic PartyBen Unger7.2%21,100Katie Eyre
District 22Democratic PartyBetty Komp7.5%14,002Kathy LeCompte
District 12Democratic PartyJohn Lively7.8%22,655Joe Pishioneri
District 49Democratic PartyChris Gorsek8.8%21,061Matthew Wand
District 24Republican PartyJim Weidner10.9%27,065Kathy Campbell

2010

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2010

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives took place in 2010. The primary election was held on May 18, 2010, and the general election was held on November 2, 2010. The candidate filing deadline was March 9, 2010. All 60 seats were up for election.

Heading into the election, Democrats held a 36-24 majority. Democrats lost six seats in the election, leaving the chamber with a 30-30 tie.

Oregon House of Representatives
Party As of November 1, 2010 After the 2010 Election
    Democratic Party3630
    Republican Party 24 30
Total60 60

During the 2010 election, the total value of contributions to the 140 House candidates was $14,996,656. The top 10 contributors were:[7]

2010 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Future PAC House Builders $1,818,536
Promote Oregon Leadership PAC $628,525
Oregon Education Association $462,227
Oregon Public Employees Local 503 $425,634
Oregon Health Care Association $246,496
Oregon Nurses Association $222,892
Oregon Beer & Wine Distributors Association $200,280
Oregon Lodging Association $194,027
Oregon Victory PAC $175,000
Oregon Trial Lawyers Association $170,068

2008

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2008

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives consisted of a primary election date on May 20, 2008, and a general election on November 4, 2008. All 60 seats were up for election.

During the 2008 election, the total value of contributions to the 130 House candidates was $16,963,664. The top 10 contributors were:[8]

2008 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Oregon House Democrats $2,016,164
Promote Oregon Leadership PAC $696,838
Oregon Public Employees Local 503 $469,254
Oregon Education Association $374,450
Oregon Victory Pac $320,000
Oregon Restaurant Association $273,817
Oregon Forest Industries Council $244,000
Oregon Health Care Association $217,106
Oregon Climate Pac $209,334
Oregon Beer & Wine Distributors Association $207,417

2006

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2006

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives consisted of a primary election date on May 16, 2006, and a general election on November 7, 2006. All 60 seats were up for election.

During the 2006 election, the total value of contributions to the 149 House candidates was $15,003,199. The top 10 contributors were:[9]

2006 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Oregon House Democrats $1,308,998
Oregon House Republicans $740,435
Oregon Victory Cmte $425,000
Oregon Education Association $363,412
Friends of Wayne Scott $349,597
Speakers Pac $299,055
Service Employees Local 503 $254,981
Associated Oregon Loggers $221,500
Oregon Restaurant Association $201,893
Oregon Beer & Wine Distributors Association $199,180

2004

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2004

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives consisted of a primary election date on May 18, 2004, and a general election on November 2, 2004. All 60 seats were up for election.

During the 2004 election, the total value of contributions to the 183 House candidates was $10,967,119. The top 10 contributors were:[10]

2004 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Oregon House Democrats $567,803
Oregon House Republicans $560,459
Oregon Education Association $387,284
Oregon Victory Cmte $325,000
Oregon Beer & Wine Distributors Association $247,051
Service Employees Local 503 $220,131
Oregon Forest Industries Council $204,105
Oregon Restaurant Association $175,049
The Speakers Pac $139,407
Oregon Health Care Association $134,234

2002

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2002

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives consisted of a primary election date on May 21, 2002, and a general election on November 5, 2002. All 60 seats were up for election.

During the 2002 election, the total value of contributions to the 156 House candidates was $11,000,936. The top 10 contributors were:[11]

2002 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Oregon House Democrats $793,786
Oregon Education Association $425,166
Oregon House Republicans $414,492
Oregon Victory Cmte $367,500
Service Employees Local 503 $230,361
Democratic Congressional Campaign Cmte $170,000
Oregon Restaurant Association $158,849
Associated Oregon Industries $155,500
Oregon Forest Industries Council $152,000
Friends of Karen Minnis $149,840

2000

See also: Oregon House of Representatives elections, 2000

Elections for the office of Oregon House of Representatives consisted of a primary election date on May 16, 2000, and a general election on November 7, 2000. All 60 seats were up for election.

During the 2000 election, the total value of contributions to the 146 House candidates was $11,077,518. The top 10 contributors were:[12]

2000 Donors, Oregon House of Representatives
Donor Amount
Oregon House Republicans $800,162
Oregon House Democrats $623,460
Oregon Victory Cmte $422,500
Oregon Education Association $376,574
Oregon Forest Industries Council $222,100
Hansen, Jim $193,769
Service Employees Local 503 $184,808
Oregon Restaurant Association $181,612
Oregon Republican Party $164,000
Oregon Auto Dealers Association $151,664
Sours: https://ballotpedia.org/Oregon_House_of_Representatives
Oregon House GOP members return amid short-session slowdown

Oregon

We hope to make GovTrack more useful to policy professionals like you. Please sign up for our advisory group to be a part of making GovTrack a better tool for what you do.

Young Americans have historically been the least involved in politics, despite the huge consequences policies can have on them. By joining our advisory group, you can help us make GovTrack more useful and engaging to young voters like you.

Our mission is to empower every American with the tools to understand and impact Congress. We hope that with your input we can make GovTrack more accessible to minority and disadvantaged communities who we may currently struggle to reach. Please join our advisory group to let us know what more we can do.

We love educating Americans about how their government works too! Please help us make GovTrack better address the needs of educators by joining our advisory group.

Would you like to join our advisory group to work with us on the future of GovTrack?

Email address where we can reach you:

Thank you for joining the GovTrack Advisory Community! We’ll be in touch.

Sours: https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/OR

Of oregon members house representatives

List of United States representatives from Oregon

Representative Party District Years Note Homer D. AngellRepublican3rdJanuary 3, 1939 –
January 3, 1955 Elected in 1938.
Lost renomination to Tom McCall. Les AuCoinDemocratic1stJanuary 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1993 Elected in 1974.
Retired to run for U.S. senator. Cliff BentzRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 2021 –
Present Elected in 2020.
Incumbent. Earl BlumenauerDemocratic3rdMay 21, 1996 –
Present Elected to finish Wyden's term.
Incumbent,. Suzanne BonamiciDemocratic1stJanuary 31, 2012 –
Present Elected to finish Wu's term.
Incumbent. Jim BunnRepublican5thJanuary 3, 1995 –
January 3, 1997 Elected in 1994.
Lost re-election to Hooley. Robert R. ButlerRepublican2ndNovember 6, 1928 –
January 7, 1933 Elected to finish Sinnott's term.
Lost re-election and died before next term began. Wes CooleyRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 1995 –
January 3, 1997 Elected in 1994.
Renominated but withdrew prior to election. Sam CoonRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 1953 –
January 3, 1957 Elected in 1952.
Lost re-election to Ullman. Maurice E. CrumpackerRepublican3rdMarch 4, 1925 –
July 24, 1927 Elected in 1924.
Died. Peter DeFazioDemocratic4thJanuary 3, 1987 –
Present Elected in 1986.
Incumbent. John R. DellenbackRepublican4thJanuary 3, 1967 –
January 3, 1975 Elected in 1966.
Lost re-election to Weaver. Robert B. DuncanDemocratic4thJanuary 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1967 Elected in 1962.
Retired to run for U.S. senator. 3rdJanuary 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1981 Elected in 1974.
Lost renomination to Wyden. Edwin R. DurnoRepublican4thJanuary 3, 1961 –
January 3, 1963 Elected in 1960.
Retired to run for U.S. senator. William A. EkwallRepublican3rdJanuary 3, 1935 –
January 3, 1937 Elected in 1934.
Lost re-election to Honeyman. William R. EllisRepublican2ndMarch 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1899 Elected in 1892.
Lost renomination to Moody. March 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1911 Elected in 1906.
Lost renomination to Lafferty. Harris EllsworthRepublican4thJanuary 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1957 Elected in 1942.
Lost re-election to Porter. Elizabeth FurseDemocratic1stJanuary 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1999 Elected in 1992.
Retired. Melvin C. GeorgeRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1881 –
March 3, 1885 Elected in 1880.
Retired. Edith GreenDemocratic3rdJanuary 3, 1955 –
December 31, 1974 Elected in 1954.
Retired and resigned early. La Fayette GroverDemocraticAt-largeFebruary 15, 1859 –
March 3, 1859 Elected in 1858.
Retired. Willis C. HawleyRepublican1stMarch 4, 1907 –
March 3, 1933 Elected in 1906.
Lost renomination to Mott. James H.D. HendersonRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1865 –
March 3, 1867 Elected in 1864.
Lost renomination to Mallory. Binger HermannRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1885 –
March 3, 1893 Elected in 1884.
Redistricted to the 1st district. 1stMarch 4, 1893 –
March 3, 1897 Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1892.
Resigned to become Commissioner of the General Land Office. June 1, 1903 –
March 3, 1907 Elected to finish Tongue's term.
Retired. Nan Wood HoneymanDemocratic3rdJanuary 3, 1937 –
January 3, 1939 Elected in 1936.
Lost re-election to Angell. Darlene HooleyDemocratic5thJanuary 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2009 Elected in 1996.
Retired. Michael J. KopetskiDemocratic5thJanuary 3, 1991 –
January 3, 1995 Elected in 1990.
Retired. Franklin F. KorellRepublican3rdOctober 18, 1927 –
March 3, 1931 Elected to finish Crumpacker's term.
Lost re-election to Martin. George A. La DowDemocraticAt-largeMarch 4, 1875 –
May 1, 1875 Elected in 1874.
Died. Walter LaffertyRepublican2ndMarch 4, 1911 –
March 3, 1913 Elected in 1910.
Redistricted to the 3rd district. 3rdMarch 4, 1913 –
March 3, 1915 Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1912.
Lost renomination to McArthur. Joseph LaneDemocraticOregon TerritoryMarch 4, 1851 –
February 14, 1859 Elected in 1851
Retired to run for U.S. senator upon statehood. Lafayette LaneDemocraticAt-largeOctober 25, 1875 –
March 3, 1877 Elected to finish La Dow's term.
Lost re-election to Williams. Rufus MalloryRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1867 –
March 3, 1869 Elected in 1866.
Retired. Charles H. MartinDemocratic3rdMarch 4, 1931 –
January 3, 1935 Elected in 1930.
Retired to run for governor. Clifton N. McArthurRepublican3rdMarch 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1923 Elected in 1914.
Lost re-election to Watkins. John R. McBrideRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1863 –
March 3, 1865 Elected in 1862.
Lost renomination to Henderson. Malcolm A. MoodyRepublican2ndMarch 4, 1899 –
March 3, 1903 Elected in 1898.
Lost renomination to Williamson. James W. MottRepublican1stMarch 4, 1933 –
November 12, 1945 Elected in 1932.
Died. James W. NesmithDemocraticAt-largeDecember 1, 1873 –
March 3, 1875 Elected to finish Wilson's term.
Retired. A. Walter NorbladRepublican1stJanuary 18, 1946 –
September 20, 1964 Elected to finish Mott's term.
Died. Walter M. PierceDemocratic2ndMarch 4, 1933 –
January 3, 1943 Elected in 1932.
Lost re-election to Stockman. Charles O. PorterDemocratic4thJanuary 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1961 Elected in 1956.
Lost re-election to Durno. Kurt SchraderDemocratic5thJanuary 3, 2009 –
Present Elected in 2008.
Incumbent. George K. ShielDemocraticAt-largeJuly 30, 1861 –
March 3, 1863 Won election contest.
Retired. Nicholas J. SinnottRepublican4thMarch 4, 1913 –
May 31, 1928 Elected in 1912.
Resigned to become judge to the U.S. Court of Claims. James H. SlaterDemocraticAt-largeMarch 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873 Elected in 1870.
Retired. Denny SmithRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 1981 –
January 3, 1983 Elected in 1980.
Redistricted to the 5th district. 5thJanuary 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1991 Redistricted from the 2nd district and re-elected in 1982.
Lost re-election to Kopetski. Joseph S. SmithDemocraticAt-largeMarch 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871 Elected in 1868.
Retired. Robert F. SmithRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1995 Elected in 1982.
Retired. January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 1999 Elected in 1996.
Retired. Lowell StockmanRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 1943 –
January 3, 1953 Elected in 1942.
Retired. Lansing StoutDemocraticAt-largeMarch 4, 1859 –
March 3, 1861 Elected in 1858.
Lost renomination to Thayer. Andrew J. ThayerDemocraticAt-largeMarch 4, 1861 –
July 30, 1861 Elected in 1860.
Lost election contest to Shiel. Samuel ThurstonDemocraticOregon TerritoryMarch 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851 Elected in 1849
Died. Thomas H. TongueRepublican1stMarch 4, 1897 –
January 11, 1903 Elected in 1896.
Re-elected but died before next term began. Al UllmanDemocratic2ndJanuary 3, 1957 –
January 3, 1981 Elected in 1956.
Lost re-election to D. Smith. Greg WaldenRepublican2ndJanuary 3, 1999 –
January 3, 2021 Elected in 1998.
Retired. Elton WatkinsDemocratic3rdMarch 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1925 Elected in 1922.
Lost re-election to Crumpacker. James H. WeaverDemocratic4thJanuary 3, 1975 –
January 3, 1987 Elected in 1974.
Retired to run for U.S. senator. John WhiteakerDemocraticAt-largeMarch 4, 1879 –
March 3, 1881 Elected in 1878.
Lost re-election to George. Richard WilliamsRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879 Elected in 1876.
Retired. John N. WilliamsonRepublican2ndMarch 4, 1903 –
March 3, 1907 Elected in 1902
Retired. Joseph G. WilsonRepublicanAt-largeMarch 4, 1873 –
July 2, 1873 Elected in 1872.
Died. David WuDemocratic1stJanuary 3, 1999 –
August 3, 2011 Elected in 1998.
Resigned due to sexual misconduct accusation. Wendell WyattRepublican1stNovember 3, 1964 –
January 3, 1975 Elected to finish Norblad's term.
Retired. Ron WydenDemocratic3rdJanuary 3, 1981 –
February 5, 1996 Elected in 1980.
Resigned when elected U.S. senator.
Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_United_States_representatives_from_Oregon
The House of Representatives in comparison to the Senate - US government and civics - Khan Academy

Along the way, my ass will crack today from his living and hungry cock, he mused. I have been walking towards this dream for so long, what if he was just joking. No, he may simply be afraid to deal with these with me, he will have to be active himself. Do not miss such an opportunity. Victor, meanwhile, realizing that he will have sex today, worried, as if he was waiting for the first date with his wife.

You will also be interested:

Oh sorry. -Why. -As you can see, we have strained with the guys. Or rather, they simply do not exist.



923 924 925 926 927